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farnhamstj
06-09-2009, 09:35 PM
Anyone ride off pavement? I'm new to moto's. My friends ride a ktm450 and a honda 450x. I totally suck. I've riden 3 days on a honda 250 on cobblestone and dirtroads six years ago. And One day single track on a Yamaha 450 two weeks ago. I estimate I droped the bike a good 30 times in 35miles. I only went over the bars twice so I figure I'm doing pretty good. I started the day unsure of of the shifting, rocked it for a little while at lunch, caught a little air, did some little wheelies, then I got tired so I started crashing again. So, all logic tells me I should never ride a bike again. Instead I went on-line and purchased full protective gear head to toe. I think I'm throwing all sense out and buy a Honda 450x, 05-07 Any advice?

jettaglxdriver
06-09-2009, 10:05 PM
Have fun.

rover67
06-09-2009, 10:26 PM
when you learn to ride dirt you fall. it's part of it.

You'll love it more and more the faster you get untill it's all you want to do.

I used to ride 250cc honda 2 strokes, but now it seems like the world is moving to 4 strokes.

So when you get out there.. remember.. wear your chest protector, wear your knee and shin guards, put on the helmet and goggles, put bark busters on whatever you buy, and dont ride drunk.

And no matter what you do put on a helmet even if it is to just ride down the street to show whoever it is what you bought. That's when you really hurt yourself.

Sounds like you had a great time out there. Im jealous. Get ready to spend all week recovering from a weekend full of riding.. only to torture your body again. You'll love it.

nuclearlemon
06-09-2009, 10:37 PM
i used to love it, although i was more on the slow side. bad match for my bike, an old it175e, which required constantly being on the pipe hard.

it is really a blast, but as mentioned, helmet, gloves, boots, full pants/long sleeve shirts at all times, even if it's just from the camp spot to the fishin' pond. i wouldn't change into my bike pants/shirt, and i didn't wear a chest protector (i've got natural padding:D) going to the lake from camp, but i always wore good riding pants when i hit the trail. the plastic protective sections really do help out and are much better than jeans.

there's a bike shop on broadway down near the englewood/denver border that i used to buy all my gear from...name escapes me, but i know they're still there. heck, next time i'm on the trail, just look at the tie downs i use, they're all from there;)

J Kimmel
06-09-2009, 11:13 PM
get up on the tank, grip with your legs, and relax. Have some fun :) I rode a 2007 YZ450F and its really addictive fun. know when to say when too, when you are tired and not focused you make mistakes that hurt.

check out www.thumpertalk.com , lots of good info there.

Oh and that place you're thinking of is Performance Cycle, its on Broadway a block north of Evans. They've got about the best selection and pricing in the city for parts and gear.

Red_Chili
06-10-2009, 09:42 AM
Oh and that place you're thinking of is Performance Cycle, its on Broadway a block north of Evans. They've got about the best selection and pricing in the city for parts and gear.
Performance is a fine shop, and Eddie is a wealth of info. The best pricing in the city, however, is not their strength. That would belong to Moto Gear Outlet in Arvada, also very helpful folks.

Wow. Never ceases to amaze me how many folks start out on a top of the line go-fast motorcycle! Good gosh man. But if you can stay on it, and have friends who are good mentors... go for it.

Protective gear is certainly a requirement. No one ever wore much when I was learning in the early 70s. Knee guards? What are those? I went through a LOT of Levi's... and most recently a knee, no doubt as a balloon payment for all those years of knee abuse.

A Six-Six-One under-jersey armor suit is the Schizz! Lots of good options on moto pants too, many with pockets. Boots? MX boots tend not to be waterproof - at ALL - anymore, the theory being they need to breathe. Sidi Discovery boots are great waterproof dualsport boots adapted from trials boots. Not quite as much protection as full on Alpinestar Tech 8 boots, but they are my favs for all around riding. Good enduro jackets are light, breathe well, and are waterproof; MSR makes good ones, as do others. DAMHIK how easy it is to go from sweating on a summer day in the woods, to hypothermic, all due to a Colorado thunderstorm. MSR also makes a great MC pack that will carry tools and water, and do so snugly and securely.

Something to consider is a bike that can be titled. Once upon a time, you could buy any dirt bike in Colorado, add lights and a mirror and horn, sign an affidavit, and you got a plate. You could ride between trails with the greatest of ease.

Of course, that is no more. Old bikes are grandfathered if they already have a title, but if your new bike is not street legal from the factory you ain't gonna plate it. KTM saw this coming, and for a while now has been making REAL woods-worthy machines that are also fully street legal. If you are considering a new bike, that certainly tips the scales. KTM makes FINE machines that are reliable IF you maintain them (not much oil capacity means frequent changes and quality oil, that sort of thing).

The MSF has a dirt bike school, and I saw quite a number of classes in Colorado Springs recently. That would REALLY be a jumpstart on skill and safety. Something to consider, and it would be really fun too.

Consider dualsporting. It closely parallels 4x4 stuff and with more and more trails being closed, and losing more and more connecting routes, it may soon be the only way to enjoy offroad motorcycling in CO without going in circles.

Lemme know if you got any questions or need help in any way.

subzali
06-10-2009, 09:59 AM
Performance is a fine shop, and Eddie is a wealth of info.

Agreed. Eddie was amazing when we were buying helmets.

Wow. Never ceases to amaze me how many folks start out on a top of the line go-fast motorcycle! Good gosh man. But if you can stay on it, and have friends who are good mentors... go for it.

Protective gear is certainly a requirement...
A Six-Six-One under-jersey armor suit is the Schizz!

I did...:o - it's fun :D

I have the Six-Six-One pressure suit and am loving it! Haven't been in real hot riding yet though, so don't know if it's going to be too hot.

Something to consider is a bike that can be titled. Once upon a time, you could buy any dirt bike in Colorado, add lights and a mirror and horn, sign an affidavit, and you got a plate. You could ride between trails with the greatest of ease.

Of course, that is no more. Old bikes are grandfathered if they already have a title, but if your new bike is not street legal from the factory you ain't gonna plate it. KTM saw this coming, and for a while now has been making REAL woods-worthy machines that are also fully street legal. If you are considering a new bike, that certainly tips the scales.

I got mine titled and licensed after adding mirrors, horn and light package (3 months ago), and it wasn't street legal from the factory. But it was in Castle Rock, so YMMV.

J Kimmel
06-10-2009, 10:09 AM
after shopping around several places, Eddie was the guy that I got my boots from. He was the only one who had a clue what they were all about, and why a 500 pair of Gaerne boots were so much better than a 100 pair of Thors.

I agree with the dual sport thing, my next bike will be a WR450 when they come out with EFI.

subzali
06-10-2009, 10:15 AM
KTM 950 Super Enduro (http://ktm.com/950-Super-Enduro-R.67.20.html)

:drool:

Jacket
06-10-2009, 10:53 AM
I used to ride 250cc honda 2 strokes, but now it seems like the world is moving to 4 strokes.



In my little world I'm seeing a revitalized interest in 2 strokes. I've got a small group of folks I ride with in the summer months, and for the longest time I was the only 2 stroke (they made me ride in the back so no one had to eat my blue smoke....). But over the last three years, they've all switched back over to a 2 stroke. The biggest problem is needing to carry oil or ensure you don't exceed your range for a day trip.

Obviously if you are doing multi-day travels a 4 stroke is really the only option.


So when you get out there.. remember.. wear your chest protector, wear your knee and shin guards, put on the helmet and goggles, put bark busters on whatever you buy, and dont ride drunk.



Definitely!

As for what bike to choose, I guess it depends on what terrain you will ride on, and for how long. Dual sports are great, but they are heavy and you need to be a good rider to manage them over rocky trails. But for dirt roads and extended travels both on and off road they are a blast. If you plan on mostly day trips cruising the FS roads for 50 miles or less, go a bit lighter, and if necessary change gearing to improve your low end.

Red_Chili
06-10-2009, 12:43 PM
I got mine titled and licensed after adding mirrors, horn and light package (3 months ago), and it wasn't street legal from the factory. But it was in Castle Rock, so YMMV.
You got lucky!! They are clamping down. I don't know if any auditing will be going on, but I've heard rumors. Mostly has to do with the EPA side of things... you know, where they go after the brown cloud effect of chainsaws and lawnmowers.

In my little world I'm seeing a revitalized interest in 2 strokes. I've got a small group of folks I ride with in the summer months, and for the longest time I was the only 2 stroke (they made me ride in the back so no one had to eat my blue smoke....). But over the last three years, they've all switched back over to a 2 stroke. The biggest problem is needing to carry oil or ensure you don't exceed your range for a day trip.

I have a dualsported XR650R for covering ground... but cannot seem to part with my old KDX220. It will thread a needle in the woods. Feels incredibly light in comparison with the Big Red Pig... :lmao:



Dual sports are great, but they are heavy and you need to be a good rider to manage them over rocky trails. But for dirt roads and extended travels both on and off road they are a blast. If you plan on mostly day trips cruising the FS roads for 50 miles or less, go a bit lighter, and if necessary change gearing to improve your low end.
That is becoming less true with the KTMs. Virtually no difference in performance nor weight between dualsports and focused-purpose machines.

It is becoming obvious that Rising Sun needs a motorcycle chapter, and a ride or three!

Red_Chili
06-10-2009, 12:46 PM
I have the Six-Six-One pressure suit and am loving it! Haven't been in real hot riding yet though, so don't know if it's going to be too hot.

It's not. Breathes well. Might need a poly Tee shirt under it though, unless you want purple nurples.

subzali
06-10-2009, 01:19 PM
It's not. Breathes well. Might need a poly Tee shirt under it though, unless you want purple nurples.

Good advice - I'll use that tomorrow :thumb::p:

Tuesday wheeling? Nah, Thursday dirtbiking :D

Beater
06-10-2009, 08:22 PM
http://denver.craigslist.org/mcy/1212450555.html

farnhamstj
06-10-2009, 11:07 PM
I got axo boot's and helmet already. Don't remember the brands of the rest of the stuff. But yes I have all the gear already. I had an easier time borrowing someones bike but rounding up gear that fit took a little while. One guys boots, someone elses helmet, another persons clothing. So three stops to borrow a bike safely. I wore full gear the one day I went out. While I didn't make helmet contact with the ground. I did hit my head on a few trees and definatly put the other pads to the ground. I've considered buying a "smaller bike" but that really only seems to apply to the size of the motor and not the actual bike. I'll be typically above 8,0000ft so I figure it doesn't have the power it would at sea level. I used to be hardcore MTBer. So I've got some skills on 2 wheels. I rock the downhills and feel great. It's the up hills I flail on. If I think, "this thing goes up-hill with the control of a jet-ski" Then I survive.
I have a desire to ride single-track and mountain passes. The 650-950 dual sports too much bike for the s-t. 250's too small for m-p. Split the difference go 450 correct? My two friends of 15+years both ride 450's

I live in Eagle co. Easy to get a bike plated. Heck, I got my fj40 plated using just hand signals.

Red_Chili
06-11-2009, 11:10 AM
Depends on the 250. Certainly a 220 2 stroke is adequate to 10K. 2-strokes tend to equal about double the displacement (more or less) of 4-strokes.

There are 450s and there are 450s. Flywheel weight and tractability make a HUGE difference, and it sounds like you may have a Yammie built for the MX track rather than singletrack. It will punish you and not give you much for the extra work involved. The WR450F is a whole different animal on singletrack from the YZ450F.

Hendog
06-11-2009, 12:55 PM
Go big C.C.--- you will grow into it!!!

Jacket
06-11-2009, 01:58 PM
If I was shopping for a trail bike.

:drool:

KTM 300 EXC (http://denver.craigslist.org/mcy/1212477811.html)

Red_Chili
06-11-2009, 03:27 PM
The KTM XC or EXC positively RULES the woods. Weight of a point-and-shoot lightweight, but it's a big bore and torque out the wazoo.

Yes... 300cc is big bore for two smokes.

farnhamstj
06-11-2009, 10:15 PM
I'm a little afraid of the ktm. I'm all of 5'9" with shoes on. Sure it can be lowered. KTM I think, fast and hang on for life. Honda, I think riding lawn mower.

Mendocino
06-11-2009, 11:08 PM
Far,

I'll be pissed off when you post up that you have had a painful crash.:eek: I rode a Husky 500 CR and felt like a cartoon character going up mountains holding onto the bars as my legs flagged in the wind and hoping the Widow maker didn't make my future wife a widow.

Respect the bike.:rolleyes:

OK--based on the thread I know you are...:)

Epilogue [campfire story]: I crashed into a tree in the Arizona desert about 5 yeas ago on an ATV and now have arthritis in my right shoulder from the event. Respect the bike.

Beater
06-12-2009, 07:49 AM
I'm a little afraid of the ktm. I'm all of 5'9" with shoes on. Sure it can be lowered. KTM I think, fast and hang on for life. Honda, I think riding lawn mower.

I KNOW this isn't you, but I have seen lot's of bad things happen from statements like that... Honda's are well known for having "smooth" power transitions and not being peaky. That being said, and morgan is way ahead of me on this I'm sure, but pull out the paper on the bikes. hp/weight ratio and torque curve is (i'm guessing) going to be relatively similar, with any 2-stroke having a higher torque point than a 4 toker.

THAT being said, NOTHING beats a well tuned smoker. Nuttin... I have been toying with a super-moto/motard desire for a couple of years, and was around my first one around 20 years ago. A zuk, honda or ktm with dual wheel sets (for gearing/tires) and a broad ranged fork and shock would be a dream bike for me..

Go to imi and check out the super-moto races... that'll get that dual sport blood/desire/silliness flowing..

my biggest bike decision this weekend is whether or not to take the duc to the hills, or got to the track on saturday with the mopeds and scooters..

j

farnhamstj
06-12-2009, 09:39 AM
Totally a joke, I'm gonna get my a$$ handed to me either way. The other day I rode I only shifted out of 1st gear twice and that was on a dirt road and I only got to 3rd gear. I'm pretty safety minded. borderline neurotic

Red_Chili
06-12-2009, 12:04 PM
Start with a bike you know you will outgrow, then. If you are down in the Littleton area I'll let you sit on my Kawasaki KDX220, which would be plenty of bike to learn on (and for that matter, it remains plenty of bike for me in the woods and I've got nearly 40 years experience). Cheap fun, you can obtain decent KDX 200s or 220s for $1200-1900 or so and ride them till the wheels fall off. Get good, learn your style, learn what you like and don't like, then buy the bike that fits you.

(You can also sit on the Honda Big Red Pig and we'll see what you make of 'lawn mower'... :lmao:). Perhaps you can test ride a CRF450F for weekend lawn trimming... :lmao: :lmao: There is a paper-thick difference between the Hondas and the KTMs when it comes to beginner-friendliness.

You WILL fall down. A lot. So figure your first bike is a dispose-A-bike and make peace with it.