PDA

View Full Version : What makes a rig an "expedition" rig?


leiniesred
08-13-2009, 03:55 PM
I was recently enjoying looking at the trucks on an expedition website. Naturally, there are variations based on the operator's prefrences for comfort, but what makes an expedition/adventure/rig?

I guess I don't get it?
I lived out of my 1980 Ford Bronco for 3 months on my post-college "Great West Tour." Plenty of dirt roads and adventures in out of the way locales for up to 5 days at a time.
My modifications included:
31" mud tires, cup holders, CB radio, and a gun rack (for the flyrod)
Threw my backpacking stuff into a plastic tub, tossed in a mt. bike and my harmonica and took off.

So what makes an expedition rig?
Is it the snorkle, rooftop tent, sand ramps and big lights or is it the harmonica?
:dunno:

Uncle Ben
08-13-2009, 04:05 PM
Crock Pot! ;)

gahi
08-13-2009, 04:15 PM
to me, an ideal expedition rig would be something that'll run 85 mph, for getting to where you want to go. Next it would be able to carry enough fuel, water, and supplies to be self sufficient for 1-2 weeks. Even new stuff breaks down, so I would want something that I'll be able to get parts for around the world.
Lifted, Lockers, Recovery gear, pretty much just be able to take care of yourself where ever you decide to go.

DaveInDenver
08-13-2009, 04:20 PM
Crock Pot! ;)
That's my vote.

Most of that expedition and overlanding stuff is glamping (GLamour cAMPING). Sure, it's functional, but mostly it's cool looking. A beat up 1989 4Runner that is actually out on the trail is more of an expedition rig than a D90 with a snorkel sitting at King Soopers. The key I think is that the truck meets your need to live out of it for an extended period of time and what that means is up to you.

FJBRADY
08-13-2009, 04:27 PM
You have to have a women with you :thumb:

Squishy!
08-13-2009, 05:23 PM
You have to have a women with you :thumb:

A women? Is that multiple? Singular? or one stitched together Franky style?























My Dad calls me a smart-ass. I hate it when he's right... :lmao:

Lars
08-13-2009, 05:31 PM
I like what was said in the begininng. it's"based on the operator's prefrences for comfort". To me an expedition in general is personal. Yours looks like no other. Based on that the equiment needed is also personal. Even from one expedition to another. Safety and reliability are pairmount, beyond that, there are too many factors.

AxleIke
08-13-2009, 05:35 PM
I personally feel an expedition vehicle is a vehicle that is self sufficient enough to be in the back country for more than a week to two weeks. Under a week is just camping.

Or, perhaps its an expedition, but then a stock 1987 4runner is an expo rig, since, when I was a wee lad of 5 and 6, we did 6 day trips with 2 adults and 3 youngins into beef basin in a little truck, with nothing more than a roof rack and a box of tools and spares.

nakman
08-13-2009, 05:38 PM
x2 on reliability, also on trail repairability, also some redundancy.. or alternative solutions to issues. Like when you can swap 3rds if you grenade the back one and still get out in 2wd, or alter some combination of hub/driveshaft/etc. to go 2wd, or dual batteries, and having both a fridge and a cooler... Hot Dogger and a Snackster, 2 forms of compressed air, etc.


But at the end of the day, if you consider yourself on an expedition then you've got yourself an expedition rig.

FJBRADY
08-13-2009, 06:05 PM
[QUOTE=Squishy!;115528]A women? Is that multiple? Singular? or one stitched together Franky style?

Depends on how you roll.....one :Princess: enough for me, you will find out soon enough....won't cha :bowdown:

TIMZTOY
08-13-2009, 06:09 PM
A women? Is that multiple? Singular? or one stitched together Franky style?

or blow-up...
easy to pack when your done and no arguments...:lmao::lmao::lmao:

stickers, expition means you need lots of stickers..

Red_Chili
08-13-2009, 06:12 PM
x2 on reliability, also on trail repairability, also some redundancy.. or alternative solutions to issues. Like when you can swap 3rds if you grenade the back one and still get out in 2wd, or alter some combination of hub/driveshaft/etc. to go 2wd, or dual batteries, and having both a fridge and a cooler... Hot Dogger and a Snackster, 2 forms of compressed air, etc.
Hmmm, cooler and Snackster aside (Hot Dogger works great), the Chili is there. I kinda think like you do Nakky.

A week or two self sufficient on fuel? Geez, that's a lot of fuel cans!!

I hang with some folks who are into adventure motorcycling. Kinda the same thing. It starts being a competition though, with comparisons like "that ain't adventure riding, THIS is adventure riding...". That's not the point (unless you are into ego bolstering I think).

For me, an expedition truck is a Swiss army knife vehicle. It will do anything you ask of it, short of the extremes, and do so reliably, and have enough aboard for comfort and field repair - and do it for a long long time.

In my case, that ranges from boulders to boulevards with equal utility, including towing, interstate travel for hunting, all weather operation, shelter, broad use. Trailer queens need not apply. It's as much about getting there as being there.

nakman
08-13-2009, 09:29 PM
It's as much about getting there as being there.

here here! :cheers:

Corbet
08-13-2009, 10:09 PM
To me an expedition rig is one built to go long distances over a wide variety of terrain. Verse a vehicle that is build specific like a rock buggy or mud bogger etc...

I would describe 90% or more of the rigs in our club as expedition vehicles. Some just have more toys that others ;)

wesintl
08-13-2009, 10:22 PM
I always kinda compare what I see to what I think real expedition vehicles are in europe that drive across the sahara or to south africa or some aussi rigs etc. Personally I think most of the expedition rigs in the US are glorified and probably wouldn't last in other parts of the world. It's just different here. There is no need to carry 20 gal of water and fuel isn't going to be pumped from a 5 gal drum and be gone from home for at lease a month if not 6 or a year. So most of the mods you would see for an expedition in other parts of the world are just not needed here IMHO. It's really your level of comfort and where you're going. I guess I could call the 93 honda accord an expedition vehicle because a girl and I drove it all over the west, camped, carried our bikes, etc.

:twocents:

farnhamstj
08-14-2009, 09:41 PM
If you go on on expedition with your rig, it's an expedition rig. Otherwise it's just a regular rig.
"Come on kids lets go on an expedition to OutBack for some Bloomin' Onions"
Expedition.
"Come on kids lets drive to OutBack for some Bloomin' Onions"
NOT Expedition.

Squishy!
08-17-2009, 10:46 AM
If you go on on expedition with your rig, it's an expedition rig. Otherwise it's just a regular rig.
"Come on kids lets go on an expedition to OutBack for some Bloomin' Onions"
Expedition.
"Come on kids lets drive to OutBack for some Bloomin' Onions"
NOT Expedition.

:lmao::lmao::lmao::lmao::lmao:

Rezarf
08-17-2009, 11:29 AM
THere is a simple answer that everyone seems to be missing. A fridge. NO other part on a rig will make long distance travel (in a car, truck, buggy etc.) more comfortable than a fridge.

I have to agree, we have such a great system of paved roads here, most of the "expedition" rigs mean, I want to go sight seeing with gear, not rock crawl. ;)

Crash
08-17-2009, 01:01 PM
Hello from Whitefish, Montana, with Lake Louise, in BC Canada, in our sights. I'd say that a lockered FZJ 80, preferably a supercharged '97 40th Anniversary edition, with Technitop tent and awning, Waeco fridge, Milford barrier to keep the Golden Retrievers in place and to hang gear off of, Slee armored, etc. is a great expedition platform. Ran into Mudzilla (on Mud) who is from Calgary, in Bozeman, MT a couple of days ago in his JDM 80 with turbo diesel and his claim of a 1200 mile fuel range - he has the subtank - sounded like a good option. Anyway, what I really think is that we could be doing this trip in any vehicle, it is just a matter of personal preference and the real deal is having places to go that are worth exploring and all of us have that with Colorado being a great place to begin and end any expedition. Don't know when this current expedition will end!