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subzali
08-26-2009, 01:40 PM
Yea, nay?

My bride-to-be got me a Dutch Oven after hearing me sing its praises on the Ghost Town Run and seeing the wonderful dishes that transpire from its use. I was also recently given a book on Dutch Oven care and usage and am very excited to try my hand at this method of cooking; it seems to be right up my alley. In reading this book, however (The Complete Book of Dutch Oven Cooking by J. Wayne Fears), the author talks about using aluminum baking pans for acidic foods (because it harms the seasoning on the cast iron oven). For a few years now I have been brought up to render aluminum useless for cooking, unless coated with teflon or some other kind of non-stick, because of leaching of the aluminum into food and the supposedly poor health effects that are caused by that. Reading a little online has revealed that my information MAY have been faulty, and there does not appear to be any information and research that unequivocally supports the notion that aluminum is harmful.

Discuss.

It is noted, however, not to use acidic foods with aluminum

Red_Chili
08-26-2009, 02:02 PM
I stay away from it, and from aluminum-based antiperspirants. Whether supported or not by current data, it frankly is not hard to do... so the less the better IMHO.

Jacket
08-26-2009, 02:11 PM
My wife must have drawn the same conclusion about dutch oven cooking - she got me a new pot and a cookbook for my birthday last week.

As for aluminum, I never use it, but not because I knew of any specific harm it could cause. I just prefer iron and steel, or teflon-coated for skillets.

DaveInDenver
08-26-2009, 02:14 PM
Aluminum dutch ovens don't work as well, for one major reason. The only valid reason IMHO for them is weight and that's a compromise decision. We cook acidic foods (for example tomato dishes) in our dutch oven and camp stoves all the time and the seasoning can be affected. But if you season them properly and keep them seasoned it's only slightly worse than normal wear and tear.

But the brewing and beverage industry avoids aluminum as much as possible because of the acids. We got rid of all of our uncoated aluminum pans (one or two) and I've personally switched to only using real tin foil for my head gear because of the contact with aluminum worries me. Back when I still home brewed my boiling pot was a 7 gallon turkey frying kettle and after a good vigorous boil the sides would be shiny bright. That's one of the reasons I stopped brewing and eventually sold off the gear, because I couldn't afford a decent >5 gallon pot and the aluminum taste was palatable. If you do use aluminum cookware, let the oxidation happen and do not scrub them bright with steel wool or anything, it's safer I understand when it's dull gray.

subzali
08-26-2009, 02:32 PM
My wife must have drawn the same conclusion about dutch oven cooking - she got me a new pot and a cookbook for my birthday last week.

As for aluminum, I never use it, but not because I knew of any specific harm it could cause. I just prefer iron and steel, or teflon-coated for skillets.

Matt, I don't know what you two ate during the GTR, but maybe our :Princess: are trying to tell us something? :lmao:

leiniesred
08-26-2009, 03:04 PM
Great, so now I have to start using a cast iron pot on my "head gear" in place of the tin-foil cap I've been wearing for years?! SHOOT!

Crash
08-26-2009, 03:08 PM
Great, so now I have to start using a cast iron pot on my "head gear" in place of the tin-foil cap I've been wearing for years?! SHOOT!

Titanium is where it's at for cooking and for head gear and complete body coverage for that matter.

nakman
08-26-2009, 03:19 PM
What you talking about, head gear?

subzali
08-26-2009, 03:22 PM
Titanium is light weight, but it also doesn't conduct heat as well so if you're not careful it will heat things unevenly, creat hot spots, and have a higher likelyhood of burning!

nakman
08-26-2009, 03:24 PM
As for cooking hazards, IMO it's one of those correlation does not imply causation things. The results are, at best, inconclusive. So avoid it if you want, or don't avoid it, and you'll likely turn out about the same....

http://www.webmd.com/alzheimers/guide/controversial-claims-risk-factors

corsair23
08-26-2009, 03:25 PM
...I've personally switched to only using real tin foil for my head gear because of the contact with aluminum worries me.

Great, so now I have to start using a cast iron pot on my "head gear" in place of the tin-foil cap I've been wearing for years?! SHOOT!

http://www.risingsun4x4club.org/uploads/smileys/tinfoilhat2.gif http://www.risingsun4x4club.org/uploads/smileys/tinfoilhat4.gif

corsair23
08-26-2009, 03:28 PM
As for cooking hazards, IMO it's one of those correlation does not imply causation things. The results are, at best, inconclusive. So avoid it if you want, or don't avoid it, and you'll likely turn out about the same....

http://www.webmd.com/alzheimers/guide/controversial-claims-risk-factors


Sort of like the BPA or whatever it was in plastic water bottles that was supposedly going to poison my kids and therefore the :Princess: threw out all of the water bottles so we could spend more :twocents: on buying new BPA free water bottles only to later find out that the BPA scare was much to do about nothing? :rolleyes:

DaveInDenver
08-26-2009, 03:42 PM
Jeff saw it. ;-)

So Lt. DaveInDenver, proudly serving in the tin foil brigade.

And besides, if it was good enough for ABBA, it's good enough to keep my brain waves secret.