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RicardoJM
09-09-2009, 12:35 PM
This past weekend I installed a Lock Right in the rear. The process is well documented in other areas and Romer and Pablo Cruise's write ups on MUD were very helpful:thumb:. Most of the posts from people that have done this indicated it was a 2 hour job. It took me quite a bit longer, but I'm often slower than everyone else. I did have one stud that came out when I was removing the nuts that hold on the diff cover. It was very easy to put it back in and get the nut off; just took some PB Blaster and thread cleansing using a small pick tool.

The old gasket for the diff cover did not come off in one piece and I was glad to have a new one to put in. After cleaning off the old gasket residual, the new gasket went on dry (no RTV) and is sealing well.

I replaced the 24mm drain plug with one of the "allen head" plugs. A torx bit works great for the new plug.

I did have the short side c-clip slip out on me once. I used the tape on a thin wrench trick to put it back in and the tape got stuck inside - so I had to remove the parts to get the tape out. In the end, using a thin wrench to position the clip coupled with pulling the axle out when the clip was seated worked very smoothly. My thrust washers were in good shape and my gap was .163" which is on the upper end of the acceptable range but well within spec. In retrospect I wish I had measured the thickness of my thust washers, just so I know what they were. The locker was missing springs when I got it, so new pins and springs were installed. :oOh yeah, I put in the thick center pin before getting all the springs installed, so I had to remove it to rotate the locker to get all the springs in.

Driving with the locker has been different, particularly in slow, turning situations like parking lots. Yesterday was the first time HutHut had to drive in the school parking lot and he did not like the bucking and ratcheting - but he will adapt just fine. When I drove the 40 after the installation, I really could not hear any ratcheting and only occasional bucking. I'm looking forward to taking it out on the trails and seeing how it does. It will be nice to not have to rely on momentum and be able to slowly move through.

I didn't bother to take any pictures of the process, but did take this picture of the diff internals that were removed and not needed for the locker install. http://www.risingsun4x4club.org/uploads/ricardojm/lockright/w_gears.jpg

timmbuck2
09-09-2009, 12:41 PM
hey Ricardo.....guess what I just found..... :banghead:

MDH33
09-09-2009, 12:48 PM
Great job Ricardo, you'll love the locker on trails.

What's next?

Hulk
09-09-2009, 01:05 PM
You didn't need the thrust washers when you installed the LockRight?

subzali
09-09-2009, 01:55 PM
I have found that with careful clutch work and shifting into neutral I can avoid 90+% of the bucking...

Tell him not to freak out the first time it goes BANG!

Great job! You'll love it on the trails! :thumb:

wesintl
09-09-2009, 03:16 PM
using a heavier weight gear oil like 140 helps keep things quiet and I think is recommended by lockrite

matt, those are just the leftovers in the pic.

Jacket
09-09-2009, 04:07 PM
Very nice, although I disappointed in the lack of pictures....;) I know I'll be wanting the same for my rig very soon.

I think those spare parts would look nice in a wicker bowl with some potpourri around it. :D

nuclearlemon
09-09-2009, 04:42 PM
the spare parts should go in a heavy ziplock bag in your toolbox. lockrights do blow up occasionally so carrying the leftover parts means you have stuff to get off the trail;)

subzali
09-09-2009, 04:46 PM
I have the original spider gears in the cardboard Lockright box and have them in the bottom of my Tuffy console. When I broke my rear pinion in Moab it was easier and nicer to put the spiders back in and drive home with no front diff and an open rear diff than trying to get the springs back in on the side of the road and drive home with a locked rear end when I knew I wouldn't need it until after I tore it down and sealed it properly while I was rebuilding a new front diff...

The next step after my lockright install was new tires, about a week later! So when can we expect some new shoes (and hopefully some new rims) for your truck Ricardo!? What do you think you're going to go with!?

Jacket
09-09-2009, 05:10 PM
Ok fine - then only run the potpourri display until your next trail run. Sheesh - so practical around here...:rolleyes:

RicardoJM
09-09-2009, 05:16 PM
You didn't need the thrust washers when you installed the LockRight?

Yes, I did need the side gear thrust washers - they are bigger than the ones in the picture. The small ones in the picture are for the spider (is that the right name) gears and are not needed.

Very nice, although I disappointed in the lack of pictures....;) I know I'll be wanting the same for my rig very soon.

I'm up for giving you a hand when you get to your install.

using a heavier weight gear oil like 140 helps keep things quiet and I think is recommended by lockrite

I saw that many have gone with a heavier weight and thought about it, but ended up going with the 90wt that was in the garage.

the spare parts should go in a heavy ziplock bag in your toolbox.

I have them in a ziploc bag, just need to find room in the toolbox; with hub socket, spark plug socket, bfh, brass punch, snap ring pliers, wrenches, knee pads, gloves - the bottom of the box if pretty full.:eek:


So when can we expect some new shoes (and hopefully some new rims) for your truck Ricardo!?
Rims are in the works, but my tires are still good. Also need to get my 1F oiling system upgrade (F.5 engine and 4speed) done sometime this soon.

Rzeppa
09-11-2009, 07:49 PM
Hi Ricardo! Nice! You'll love the difference on the trail (and snow!). Best upgrade I ever did.

X5 on most of the replies. On clicking, twitchyness, etc. you'll adjust to it quick enough after you drive it a bit. It's pretty easy to get used to.

For those who want pictures, I wrote a lockright install article in Toyota Trails. Included photos, tips, P/Ns on shims, etc. I use the butter knife and duct tape method for the last c-clip install. Is that what you meant by the "skinny wrench" Ricardo?

jettaglxdriver
09-11-2009, 08:03 PM
Sounds like fun.

I cannot wait until I am at the point of putting a locker in my 60

RicardoJM
09-11-2009, 08:57 PM
Is that what you meant by the "skinny wrench" Ricardo?

Yup, the skinny wrench is from my bicycle tools - a Park CBW (http://www.parktool.com/products/detail.asp?cat=14&item=CBW-1)-1 to be precise. :thumb:

Rzeppa
09-12-2009, 07:23 PM
Yup, the skinny wrench is from my bicycle tools - a Park CBW (http://www.parktool.com/products/detail.asp?cat=14&item=CBW-1)-1 to be precise. :thumb:

Okay, that's an actual wrench. I learned to use a (real honest-to-goodness) butter knife to install that last c-clip on Lock-Righted diffs. Cheeseman? Maybe Jethro? One of the wise ones showed me this trick. I know it was when we were fixing Jethro's (Pinion Boy's) rear on Poison Spider.

But basically, you take some duct tape and affix the c-clip to the butter knife such that when you hook the c-clip into the groove on the axle you pull the butter knife out and the c-clip slips into place in the groove and the duct tape comes back out with the butter knife.

Works like a charm.