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View Full Version : Pick um up truck?


farnhamstj
10-09-2009, 09:44 AM
I'm looking for suggestions. My needs are 4 door, room for motorcycles in the back. Gotta pull my camper(3000lbs). I owned a 2002 tacoma xcab. It was too small. I'm thinking 2004ish Tundra. If you have a pu truck, what is it? why did you choose it? Am I short changing myself by disregarding anything non Toyota? I kind of have a weak spot for a Dodge 2500.
Tundra owners. How do you fight the urge to "build it" I'm not after another trail rig, I don't think.
I'm about a year away from a purchase, I think.

There's a guy in Brekenridge selling an '02 that needs a new motor?

Jacket
10-09-2009, 10:00 AM
You've seen my truck - fits a family of 4 and a ton of gear with no problem. Can tow 5000lbs per Toyota with the V6 and tow package (includes nice 130A alternator), although it's not going to pull like a V8. The short bed means you have to leave the tailgate down to haul the bike, but I've done it countless times with my Honda (the weight of the back tire holds the tailgate steady). I've even had two bikes in my bed, one of which was a XR 650.

Plus, it wheels pretty good.....

Corbet
10-09-2009, 10:12 AM
why not just a trailer for the bike/s? Pull with the 100 series.

MDH33
10-09-2009, 10:44 AM
why not just a trailer for the bike/s? Pull with the 100 series.

That's what I was thinking too. I hate loading bikes up steep ramps, but I'm also scrawny. :o

powderpig
10-09-2009, 10:49 AM
Trailer cost a lot less a year in fee's and maintaince, insurance.
But trucks are nice

Jacket
10-09-2009, 10:57 AM
I'm guessing he wants to be able to pull the pop-up camper and take the bike(s) along.

Edit: If it's just one bike, you could mount a hitch to the back of the camper and install one of those hitch mount motorcycle trays.

nakman
10-09-2009, 11:00 AM
Here you go Farnham.. DC's a lot roomier & useful than your extended cab was http://denver.craigslist.org/cto/1413564872.html

subzali
10-09-2009, 11:01 AM
I looked around at the consumer reports a bit and drove a few trucks before deciding on my Tundra. My runner-up was a 1/2 ton or 3/4 ton Chevy pickup in the 2003 model year range. But at the end of the day I couldn't quite see myself driving that truck for some reason. But once I sat in my 2000 Tundra, there was no going back. The fit, finish, and feel was that oh-so-familiar Toyota familiarity - kinda like a bigger version of my red pickup, with a little mix of 80 series Land Cruiser thrown in, plus some upgrades that got thrown in over the years. I am loving the extended cab with the 6 foot bed. But I have been drooling over the double cab with the (I think) 6 foot bed as well. A little more interior room (for kiddos or riding buddies in your case) would be nice.

One option is you can get a small dirtbike trailer - of course you can't (easily) pull both your camper and a dirtbike trailer with your 100 series.

Ultimately I personally would like to get a full size 3/4 ton or 1 ton diesel truck that can pull anything I want. BUT that truck PROBABLY wouldn't be a daily driver, which was one of the considerations I had to take with my Tundra. My Tundra is significantly bigger than my red truck, big enough that it's quite a bit more work for me to park it (it's longer and wider both), and I'm glad I didn't go with a bigger truck at this point in my life. I don't know how guys get around full time in their 4 door 8 foot bed dually diesel Ford trucks. And I don't know why Tundras, Titans etc. keep getting bigger and bigger as well; they're getting to be a pain to park and generally drive around except for on the open road in my opinion.

Bottom line: 4.7L V8 was a huge upgrade over my 2.4L 4 cyl, 4x4 was a huge upgrade over my 4x2, the access cab was a nice upgrade over my extended cab, and the leather and power everything was a nice upgrade over my deluxe trim '91 truck. My 2000 Tundra can pull 7,000 lbs., which is enough for me for now, plus it's not so big I can't park it anywhere. It gets around 15 mpg in town and up to 17 mpg on a couple trips to the mountains I have taken, which isn't great, but as long as gas prices stay where they are it's not that bad either. The familiar feel of the Toyota interior has been a big deal to me, as Ford and Chevy interiors feel so foreign and I would probably have a hard time getting used to and accepting them. The 4.7L will be familiar to you since it's basically the same engine that's in your 100.

On the double cabs ('05-'06 or '04-'06, not sure): the rear window rolls down, which can be kinda cool I guess. On the down side: the tranny is "sealed" which means there's no dipstick to check the fluid (or fill plug I think), whether it's getting burned or whether you're low. I have heard that they can develop tranny leaks, which sucks because there's not really much you can do yourself, and I think you have to take it to the dealer, but I haven't done much research into that since my model year is different. Just FYI

wesintl
10-09-2009, 11:07 AM
with a little mix of 80 series Land Cruiser thrown in,

Let's not get carried away now... :hill:

DaveInDenver
10-09-2009, 11:13 AM
Let's not get carried away now... :hill:
Don't they share same engine, tranny, rear axle, power window switches between Tundras and the 100 and 200 series?

SteveH
10-09-2009, 11:27 AM
Farnham,

I tow a 2300# (loaded) popup behind my '95 FZJ80 or my '98 4Runner 3.4l 5 speed. The 4runner has more power to tow, but is less stable in crosswinds. Neither is a 'great' tow vehicle in the Colorado mountains or a strong headwind on I-80. I briefly owned a V-10 gas crew/shortbed F250, but it was such a load to drive (huge, and zero road feel) it was killing me as a daily driver - and 12 mpg, max. I have kids and need 4 doors and a back seats, so smallish extra/crew cabs won't cut it. Wife won't want to drive the tow vehicle, so truckin' Mama with a Cummins Dodge is not happening. I was tempted to grit my teeth and buy a V8 Ford Exploder, because the depreciate so brutally. But, cooler heads have prevailed so far. I wish I had an answer for you. I want a turbo-diesel anything so badly that I can taste it, but I can't justify another giant truck with pricey tires, maintenance, 12 quarts of oil, etc. I'll probably keep slugging up Colorado passes at 40 mph, redlined in a lower gear, in whatever Toyota I have and just swallow my pride. I would like to see how a 4.7 Tundra would tow my camper up a long pass, but I suspect it won't provide the gratifying whoosh of a turbodiesel.

Please reply to this thread if you find a truck that does what you need - I'm all ears.

Steve

Beater
10-09-2009, 11:46 AM
if your not going to wheel it - get a gm or ford. sorry, but the fuel economy and cost differential are just too much to overcome. My extra-cab gm (2007) would seat adults in the rear.

it had 300 plus bhp, and got 22/23 mpg highway with a camper shell, routinely. Towed like no ones business, and rode like a cadillac. quiet as hell. It was a great car like truck. And I am traditionally a ford guy for domestics. oh, and it had a locker... what's not to like?

Red_Chili
10-09-2009, 11:59 AM
I'm guessing he wants to be able to pull the pop-up camper and take the bike(s) along.

Edit: If it's just one bike, you could mount a hitch to the back of the camper and install one of those hitch mount motorcycle trays.
As appealing as this option sounds (and believe me, I have thought long and hard about it, it is VERY appealing), the camper would sway like hell with all that weight on the rear... I would bet. Like, send-you-in-the-ditch level of sway. :eek:

Farnham, you and I could take a plasma cutter to both our campers' frames and add a motorcycle rail to the front of the camper... whatcha say? Chop shop day? :lmao:

subzali
10-09-2009, 12:08 PM
Let's not get carried away now... :hill:

Sorry Wes, I meant interior feel...

And Beater has a good point. If I were to do it again and had a little more money available to get something newer without getting into trouble I would consider a newer GM more heavily/readily. New Tundras are bleh to me. I might consider a newer Titan as well, though I haven't really researched them much yet.

The 2000-2001 Tundras have had reports of transmission problems when routinely hauling heavy loads. I think they fixed this in the later 1st gen models ('05-'06). However, the hp isn't all that great (compared to the GM), and the fuel mileage leaves something to be desired (as Beater mentions).

Even with only a couple thousand pounds behind me (a small fishing boat), the power was affected pretty significantly and the shifting was definitely affected (shifted up late and shifted down way early and was just barely into overdrive most of the time going down the road). The Tundra is definitely a smaller, lower-powered V8 compared to GM and company.

Red_Chili
10-09-2009, 12:11 PM
But seriously, I am percolating an idea to mount a motorcycle rail on the camper that won't destabilize the trailer.

Would probably put the Chili on the rear bumpstops though. :lmao:

treerootCO
10-09-2009, 12:15 PM
2012? Toyota Tundra Diesel?

Jacket
10-09-2009, 12:18 PM
On the down side: the tranny is "sealed" which means there's no dipstick to check the fluid (or fill plug I think), whether it's getting burned or whether you're low. I have heard that they can develop tranny leaks, which sucks because there's not really much you can do yourself, and I think you have to take it to the dealer, but I haven't done much research into that since my model year is different. Just FYI

Assuming it is the same tranny as the Tacomas (A750), while it's true there's no dipstick, you still have access to a drain plug and an inspect/fill plug from below on the unit itself. A bit more work to check the color/condition, but not for someone with a few tools and a light.

But like most auto trannies, draining and refilling the pan only accounts for 20-25% of the total fluid. On my wife's Honda product, I've resorted to the 3x drain and fill process, where you circulate the system a bit between drains to try and get a better chance at clearing out the old fluid. Much more expensive than a 1x drain, but not nearly as expensive as a new tranny.

My Tacoma calls for 100k miles before the first AT service. I think I'll cut that in half and see what Toyota offers for their service of the unit.

DaveInDenver
10-09-2009, 01:02 PM
Assuming it is the same tranny as the Tacomas (A750), while it's true there's no dipstick, you still have access to a drain plug and an inspect/fill plug from below on the unit itself.
Our 4Runner tranny was a A750F and it had a drain and fill plug. Not having a dip stick surprised me at first, too. But your normal services were the same as a manual tranny and way easier than dropping the pan like the old way. After the initial shock it occurred to me that it made a lot more sense, although it was a little tougher to fill than a funnel in the dip stick tube. But OTOH it was less hassle to get the right level.

farnhamstj
10-09-2009, 09:22 PM
I've thought about choping the frame on the trailer and streaching it to allow for moke space. I've thought about moving the battery and lp to the rear of the camper to help offset the weight. What I don't understand about the toyhauler pop-up's is how you can put that much weight upfront without overweighting the tounge. I thought 500lb was about all you could do on a 2"ball. It would certainly cost less that buying a truck. I'm more in the research and ask questions at this stage. I'm not ready to build another trail rig but a newer 4door Tacoma has my wifes vote at the moment. I lean toward slighly used Tundra. Before they became mega-big.

If my wife yould let me put a Aussie style alu-tray back on a 2008 double cab tacoma. i'd have a solution.

farnhamstj
10-09-2009, 09:34 PM
http://www.toyota.com.au/hilux/tray-bodies

Red_Chili
10-10-2009, 05:06 PM
I've thought about choping the frame on the trailer and stretching it to allow for moke space. I've thought about moving the battery and lp to the rear of the camper to help offset the weight. What I don't understand about the toyhauler pop-up's is how you can put that much weight upfront without overweighting the tongue. I thought 500lb was about all you could do on a 2"ball. It would certainly cost less that buying a truck. I'm more in the research and ask questions at this stage. I'm not ready to build another trail rig but a newer 4door Tacoma has my wifes vote at the moment. I lean toward slightly used Tundra. Before they became mega-big.

If my wife yould let me put a Aussie style alu-tray back on a 2008 double cab tacoma. i'd have a solution.
You think like I do. Those beds are awesome. It would be ungodly long on a Doublecab though. About like an F250 Powerstroke crew cab (which BTW I owned).

I think propane in the rear could be wicked unsafe. Especially if you had good brakes. Not sure how the tray weight thing works either, though I bet it is only some fraction of the total added weight depending on placement.

Maybe have a removable MC rail where the propane is... and store the tanks elsewhere until needed at camp?

farnhamstj
10-10-2009, 08:08 PM
Now if I could just convince my wife to let me park it in the driveway. Think i could DD this sucker? Room for motorcycles and can pull the camper.

Cheese
10-10-2009, 10:44 PM
I have a 2005 Double Cab Tundra.

I was in the situation of looking for a rig to tow the rock truck if it ever goes out again, drives decent around town, will take 4 adults across the country and will carry a bed full of wood.

99 days out of a hundred I love this truck. Fit and finish is Toyota, it is reliable and tough. 80k on it now, another 80k no worries.

To me, it is not reasonable to compare it to domestic half tons because they are not in the same league. This truck is quiet and tight inside and out.

It is also not reasonable to compare it to 3/4 ton diesels. You are getting a lot more Truck with those. Today I came up and down Cameron pass in the snow with a bed full of wood and 3 other people. More space, more power and more brakes would have made the trip smoother.

Good luck.

farnhamstj
10-11-2009, 09:55 AM
Thanks.