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View Full Version : FJ40 rear drum - leaky wheel cylinder


Jacket
11-15-2009, 11:29 AM
I noticed on the 40's only run that my rear brakes were locking up pretty easily. Finally got around to pulling off the drums, and sure enough the passenger side is leaking quite a bit from one or both cylinders. Drivers side is dusty, but no leaking.

I figure step 1 is to address the leak and clean everything up. Options seem to be:

- rebuild original cylinders vs. buying new cylinders
- OEM versus aftermarket
- replace both sides, or just the leaky side?

Any opinions? How important is honing in this process? Could I just take the cylinder apart, clean everything up, and replace the rubber/seals?

RicardoJM
11-15-2009, 12:45 PM
All are very viable options. If you think that at some point you will be going with disc on the rear, now may be the time. If you are going to replace, go ahead and do both sides.

rover67
11-15-2009, 04:53 PM
How much can you spend on it? The 60 has NAPA brake parts on it including wheel cylinders, they've done fine. Had an Autozone caliper freeze on me and have had generally bad expperiences with their brake parts. You could rebuild them just as well as napa or autozone could though... probably better. I've rebuild wheel cylinders in the past with good results.

I'd do both sides FWIW.

How much are new Toyota? I'll be ordering parts for my truck this week at boulder toyota if you want me to add something to my order. Maybe a handfull of rebuild kits from toyota?

Jacket
11-15-2009, 07:09 PM
Can anyone confirm that the Toyota wheel cylinders have TEQ stamped onto the housing? Seems like I've seen a picture that shows it, but can't find one now...

The brakes have clearly been serviced, and the shoes are nearly new, which makes me wonder if these are aftermarket cylinders. There is nothing stamped on mine, no TEQ, no L or R markers, nada.

I'm going to call around and price them out tomorrow. I broke the hard line on one side (the one between the cylinders), so I'll need to get that replaced as well.

rover67
11-15-2009, 07:36 PM
dunno if they have Teq stamped on them.. mine didn't but the truck had been worked on a lot before.

TIMZTOY
11-15-2009, 08:18 PM
If the shoues have fluid on them. Replace them. Don't just spray them. There ruined. And ya might as well replace both sides. There the same age. (aledgedly) Anymore it's about the same price to just replace the cylender than it is to rebuild it. Pluss add the (labor) factor onto rebuilding as well. And to quote recarido. I'd do disk conversion if that was on your "list"

subzali
11-16-2009, 11:18 AM
Take a hard look at the TSM rear brake conversion, if I had to do it over again I would go that route (or Monte Carlo, see MUD for info).

3 of my 4 rear cylinders were frozen a couple years ago. I sprayed them repeatedly and tried and tried to get them apart so I could rebuild them, but ended up breaking one or two of them by prying the ears off the cylinder where the shoe sits. I think I went with CCOT cylinders at the time.

If it were me and I didn't want to do a disc brake conversion, I would replace all the cylinders with new and forget about rebuilding them, and I would get all new brake shoes and start over. But once you price it out you'll find that a disc conversion isn't much more, and may even be cheaper. It was a little more at the time I had to go through this, and that little bit more was a big hairy deal so I'm still running stock cylinders.

I'm almost positive the OEM cylinders have a TEQ stamped on them, but threw my old ones away so I can't remember now.

FJ_Mark
11-16-2009, 12:09 PM
Replace them. Trying to get frozen adjusters moving again is not worth the headache. Or the time and trouble to hone old cyclinders. They are available so save your self the time and trouble. I would only overhaul them if they were rare or impossible to find.

Jacket
11-16-2009, 01:16 PM
Talked to Jerry at Boulder Toy a little while ago and had him look up the wheel cylinders. He said he found 2 RR cylinders remaining in national inventory but that they were listed as unavailable.

On the bright side, Toyota is well-stocked with wheel cylinder hard lines - good news for the over-aggressive wrencher.

Not quite ready to spend the time and $$ on a disc conversion.

SKIDPLATE
11-22-2009, 09:40 AM
I agree with replace it all. However you do need to shop around for Toyota parts. I'm finding online Toyota dealers are offering some pretty good prices on Toyota Parts. Far better than Boulder Toy. Also when I ran all new Synthetic brake fluid after the parts replacement, that helped a lot too. Figure on about 2 to 3 quarts for a really good flushing and bleeding.
Good luck

Jacket
11-23-2009, 10:48 AM
Jerry at Boulder Toyota offers excellent pricing and service, and Boulder Toyota is a sponsoring dealer for this club so I choose to support them.

Brakes are back together and working quite well. I ended up with Napa premium wheel cylinders and swapped in a new Toyota hard line where my old one snapped. Cleaned everything up, shoes adjusted, brake lines bled, and back on the road.

wesintl
11-23-2009, 11:02 AM
Nice :cheers:

subzali
11-23-2009, 11:06 AM
good work! Good brakes = good thing!

RicardoJM
11-23-2009, 11:37 AM
Very good work!!!

Air Randy
11-23-2009, 02:44 PM
I agree with replace it all. However you do need to shop around for Toyota parts. I'm finding online Toyota dealers are offering some pretty good prices on Toyota Parts. Far better than Boulder Toy. Also when I ran all new Synthetic brake fluid after the parts replacement, that helped a lot too. Figure on about 2 to 3 quarts for a really good flushing and bleeding.
Good luck

Quarts :eek: Don't you mean pints?