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View Full Version : WTB truck/4Runner V6 brake booster


Air Randy
11-29-2009, 09:21 AM
I'm upgrading my rear brakes to disc including a new master cylinder. I would like to add the V6 style brake booster at the same time.

DaveInDenver
11-29-2009, 09:51 AM
Is this on the mini truck? What master cylinder do you have now?

RockRunner
11-29-2009, 10:29 AM
The mini's have a smaller bore, the newer ones used on 96 and up trucks and 4runners have the larger as do the T100's.

Randy check with the junkyards, that is the best place. Then buy a new one at Checkers and turn in your old one. You get a new one for very cheap.
You could even order the new one and give them your 85 one they won't know.

DaveInDenver
11-29-2009, 12:19 PM
The mini's have a smaller bore, the newer ones used on 96 and up trucks and 4runners have the larger as do the T100's.

Randy check with the junkyards, that is the best place. Then buy a new one at Checkers and turn in your old one. You get a new one for very cheap.
You could even order the new one and give them your 85 one they won't know.
I've gone down this road a couple of times, it's confusing to be sure. There are a few different configurations for 1989+ trucks to get what you want.

http://risingsun4x4club.org/forum2/showpost.php?p=105941&postcount=4

The "T100 brakes" is generally the name for the S13WB calibers and optionally the 1-1/16" master cylinder. This is the same combo that would very likely have come on a V6 1992-1995 4Runner. The 1996 and newer Tacos and 4Runners might be the same, but I dunno about them. I just am 99% sure that the basic T100 and 1992-1995 V6 4Runner are basically the same (save for maybe boosters installed from Toyota). You should also match the rotors from these trucks to the calipers (so S13WB calipers to T100 rotors, S12W calipers to standard IFS rotors).

If you have a 1-1/16" bore M/C, then definitely get a booster from a 1992-1995 V6 4Runner or T100, not the 1989-1995 Pickup, 1989-1991 V6 4Runner or 1989-1995 22R-E 4Runner. The 1" M/C with a V6 trucks and 1-1/16" M/C with V6 boosters are not all the same.

In any case, select a 1992-1995 V6 4Runner or 1993-1998 1-ton V6 T100 as the donor for the booster to be sure and if you can pick and pull yourself, get the booster and M/C as one unit for the highest confidence, even if you unload the master as a core. If the M/C attached is cast with '1-1/16', that is definitely the bigger booster. In all cases, the very best way to know is match casting or inked numbers on the part. I have many Aisin or Toyota part numbers I've come across in my research in the linked post above.

The smaller 13/16" M/C and single diaphragm booster would be on 1979-1988 trucks and 4Runners. The 3rd gen Pickup and 2nd gen 4Runner all seem to have at least 1" M/C, dual diaphragm booster and S12W calipers regardless of V6 or 22R-E. My truck is a 1991, 22R-E, base DLX and it had the 1" master, S12W calipers stock and I can order parts for a non-ABS 1995 V6 SR5 Pickup and get the same parts. Some T100 trucks had a 1-1/16" M/C, but I am not sure if any 4Runner had that master.

Air Randy
11-29-2009, 01:57 PM
I have a new 1" master cylinder. From my reading it looks like as long as I get a booster for a non-ABS V6 it should be the right one.

The V6 makes it the thicker, dual diaphragm unit and the non-ABS makes it for the 1" MC where as if it was ABS it would be 1 1/16.

DaveInDenver
11-29-2009, 04:50 PM
I have a new 1" master cylinder. From my reading it looks like as long as I get a booster for a non-ABS V6 it should be the right one.

The V6 makes it the thicker, dual diaphragm unit and the non-ABS makes it for the 1" MC where as if it was ABS it would be 1 1/16.
My truck has a dual diaphragm booster and 1" master, same as all 1989-1995 4WD RN* and VZN* Pickups. If you don't necessarily need the absolute strongest one but just any dual diaphragm, then the booster sourced from any 1989 through 1995 pickup, 4Runner or T100 will get you that. If the OE master was 1" or 1-1/16", then it is always a dual diaphragm booster.

The preferred booster might be the one from a VZN130 with S13WB calipers, which means specifically a 1992-1995 V6 4Runner. The regular mini truck dual diaphragm one (44610-3D330) is different than the stronger late 2nd gen 4Runner one (44610-3D580 or 44610-3D610). If it's marked 44610-3D610 that is the one originally on the 1994-1995 non-ABS V6 4Runner. It would be marked 44610-3D620 if it was for a 1994-1995 ABS V6 4Runner.

Red_Chili
11-30-2009, 08:26 AM
If you go to Yota Jim, he has quite a few V6 boosters that will work fine for you AFAIK. I used the 1" FZJ80 master from Marlin and was done with it. Simple deal.

Oh... and you want a manual proportioning valve from Front Range Offroad Fab (a normal SAE Summit part, but with adapters to match Toy metric). Toss the LSPV, it was pretty useless anyway. Then you can also toss the brake return line from LSPV to the front tee union.

Air Randy
11-30-2009, 05:40 PM
OK! I understand the proportioning valve part since I had to do that to my 40 when I added rear discs. But what is an LSPV :rolleyes:?

DaveInDenver
11-30-2009, 05:46 PM
OK! I understand the proportioning valve part since I had to do that to my 40 when I added rear discs. But what is an LSPV :rolleyes:?
Load Sensing Proportioning Valve

On the mini truck there is a valve that controls the brake fluid flow to the rear brakes based on the suspension squat (the valve is mounted up under the frame and there a 3 foot long rod to the axle). Unloaded it flows less and as the load increases more fluid is allowed to the rear.

I dunno on the 4Runner, but it makes a difference on my pickup. I think most times it's adjusted wrong after a lift is installed or bled wrong leaving an air bubble which makes the rear act wonky. On a truck that is more dedicated it is basically unnecessary, but there is a huge difference (close to 1,000 lbs of payload difference) between 2 people + dog in a fully loaded truck with the WilderNest installed and solo driver with an empty box with no WilderNest and the LSPV is really pretty good at compensating, even though it really seems like a kludge.