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View Full Version : couple easy 80 tech questions...


nakman
04-07-2006, 12:51 PM
1. What size of what piece of what do I pick up at the Home Depot on my way home tonight, that will slide over my inner axle and release the little clip deal so I can separate that from the birfield tomorrow?

2. Any tips for getting the knuckle bearings out?

Thanks! :thumb:

Rzeppa
04-07-2006, 01:17 PM
(1) 1.5" schedule 40 (or 80 if you want)

(2) After you get the steering arms off the top and the bearing retainer off the bottom (the hard parts), it's really easy to tap them out with a large pin punch. There will be a section on the inside (two for each race) where you can get the punch onto the shoulder of the race.

Uncle Ben
04-08-2006, 12:21 AM
(1) 1.5" schedule 40 (or 80 if you want)

(2) After you get the steering arms off the top and the bearing retainer off the bottom (the hard parts), it's really easy to tap them out with a large pin punch. There will be a section on the inside (two for each race) where you can get the punch onto the shoulder of the race.


80 pivots nearly fall off once the nuts and hardware is removed! Don't forget to put a rag in the pipe so when the inner axle comes out it doesn't mash the splines on the cement floor!

nakman
04-08-2006, 04:32 PM
Pretty weak turnout at the WBPP today, where were you guys? :confused: :rolleyes: :D

Anyhoos, at this point I've got one side completely taken apart and cleaned up. Thanks for the tips so far...

nakman
04-08-2006, 04:37 PM
Do my wear marks on the inside of the birf look pretty normal? Would it be a good idea to switch sides? I plan on upgrading to Longs in November when I regear, so this only needs to work well this summer, then as a spare.

Also, are those burm marks on the outside normal? That's from when they machined the bearing races, right? and not indication of really hot balls...

North siders, got lots of :beer: here if you're feeling wrestless come on up. Anyone have an extra snap ring for the inner axles (goes inside birf). Also anyone have an extra big seal, that one that goes against the dust shield? I'll be reusing both of those if not..

Last comment is I discovered some decent grooves on the OD of the spindle, where that seal rides. Anyone seen that before? The seal itself actually looks fine, so wtf? :confused:

Uncle Ben
04-08-2006, 06:05 PM
Do my wear marks on the inside of the birf look pretty normal? Would it be a good idea to switch sides? I plan on upgrading to Longs in November when I regear, so this only needs to work well this summer, then as a spare.

Also, are those burm marks on the outside normal? That's from when they machined the bearing races, right? and not indication of really hot balls...

North siders, got lots of :beer: here if you're feeling wrestless come on up. Anyone have an extra snap ring for the inner axles (goes inside birf). Also anyone have an extra big seal, that one that goes against the dust shield? I'll be reusing both of those if not..

Last comment is I discovered some decent grooves on the OD of the spindle, where that seal rides. Anyone seen that before? The seal itself actually looks fine, so wtf? :confused:

The burn makes are from the heat treating process. The wear is normal. 80 circlips usually don't break when seperating the birfs so they don't need to be replaced. You can drive the new seal in a tad further than just flush or don't worry about it (if the seal didn't leak before you'll probably be OK) And please.....your "hot balls" are way more information than we need! :blah: :hill:

subzali
04-08-2006, 08:58 PM
uh...good luck getting that larger seal out without destroying it. Toyota has them for reasonable (I tore one up pretty bad and had to get a replacement), but I guess they won't be open tomorrow. Maybe NAPA or someone has some? How many hours are you into it? I bet you won't beat my 27 hour total :eek: :hill:

I'm surprised that I did a front axle service before you did (am I reading you right on this?)

I might be up in Boulder tomorrow, but I'll be climbing :zilla: I might come by to bug ya :p:

nakman
04-08-2006, 09:19 PM
Not the larger seal on the back of the brake, it's the one that's bolted against the dust sheild.. it falls right off. That one on the back of the brake is definitely destroyed, but I keep extras of those.

I didn't start until noon, so probably 7 hours today. Got both knuckles bolted back on, and the inner axle seals pounded in, then I got tired and hungry. Will finish up tomorrow, probably 3 hours tops just need to repack everything and slide it all back together.

This is the second time I've been in there, but the last time 2 years ago I didn't go as far as replacing the knuckle bearings or taking the birfs apart. Much more thorough job this time, plus I learned a couple things today. Also replaced the "groovy" inner axle I discovered last time, and am using the right grease this time.. :rolleyes:

edit: spent the last half hour reading Romer's definitive compilation on the 80 series front axle service. http://forum.ih8mud.com/showthread.php?t=78276 Very well done, Ken!! it's all in there.. :cheers:

Kipper
04-09-2006, 12:05 AM
I bet that thing's hard to drive with the steering arms upside down and backwards. :lmao:

nakman
04-09-2006, 02:49 PM
40's must be so light you just flip them over to work on the axles.. :lmao:


So almost back together now.. final question. I've always thought the fish scale deal was a little goofy, but today really wanted to measure my bearing load. The guy at AutoZone in Laffyette had never heard of a fish scale, so resorted to fabbing my own.

I'll give the plastic ice cream bucket & chain 1 pound. So here it is below, with my 4 lb. hammer in it, after it genly coasted down to the ground. My 24oz. hunting hammer will stay suspended in the air, but anything more than that will make it spin. Well, crank the adjusting nut you say.. since the FSM calls for 6.4 to 12.6 (SA-11). But I've already cranked it back to the 47 ft pounds I cranked it to twice to set the preload. If I didn't have the scale, I'd say this bearing is way too tight. But with the scale, it's way to loose.

So I'll take a vote of everyone on line today- trust my instincts, or trust the scale? I'm going to do the other side now, see if I get the same results... :confused:

Romer
04-09-2006, 02:59 PM
I know there is a debate between feel vs. scale. I won't comment on that. Just wondering if after you get it back together, if you will wonder how accurate your scale is. Might be worth it to you to go to Walmart, Garts, etc. for a fish scale. Not surprised the Auto[parts store didn't know what you were talking about. I got mine at Harbor freight, but it was called something else though ???

Uncle Ben
04-09-2006, 03:06 PM
:eek: :dunno: :snail: :homer: :zilla: :ranger: :flop: :flamingo: :Princess: :drink:

Rzeppa
04-09-2006, 03:42 PM
LOL! Very ingenious Tim!

A fish scale can be had at most hardware stores or anywhere they sell fishing supplies. Couple of bucks. Doesn't have to be that accurate, just within a range of turning resistance. The reason is that the rotational resistance is a more accurate gauge of proper bearing preload than the adjusting nut torque. The torque is just a rough guideline. If the torque (of course you must always back it off 1/8-1/4 turn after the torque is achived) gets you to the proper range of preload, you're fine. I was also taught that while you're checking preload, you should rotate the wheel a number of times to make sure you drive the grease from the roller-race surfaces to get a proper reading.

Below is a photo of using my fish scale to adjust the preload on my 76:

Convert
04-09-2006, 09:01 PM
The Master taught me to do it by feel no scale nessaray :D :D

subzali
04-10-2006, 12:19 AM
Tim, Wal-Mart I think is where I got mine, less than 10 bucks and I have no reason to doubt that it's set right. Very consistent readings and the feeling was right too, and I made sure as Jeff said to rotate the wheel a bunch to free up the grease and make sure the bearing was seated properly. I'd say go with the scale unless you've packed a lot of wheel bearings and know what it's supposed to feel like (don't know how many you've done). Another thing my dad said he always did with the Suburbans was to drive at highway speeds for about 20-30 miles and then get out and feel the hubs; if they're too hot then something's gone wrong, so after I got it all back together I went for a drive and everything felt fine so I knew I was good to go!

nakman
04-10-2006, 09:46 AM
Yeah I drove to Boulder yesterday, and they were pretty warm when I stopped, almost too hot to keep my hand on the nuts & cone washers. I'm going to back them off a bit tonight, and will get a scale on my way home. Be nice if the fronts were more like the back, where you just line up the notches & forget about it..