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Blackdiamond72
01-04-2010, 11:04 AM
When I bought my 69 fj40, it had a pto winch mounted upfront and the pto take off was on the transfer, but no driveline. I plan on running the snow and pizza run in a few weeks and am thinking I should get the winch up and running before hand. Does anyone have the knowhow to make one, or know where I could have one made. The PO said that Coyote Cruisers up in the Fort could do one for $100 but based on the other mods they supposedly did to this truck, I don't want to go there. (on a side note, if they didn't do the poor work on the cage and other things, I'm sorry for bashing them)

So, any thoughts? I feel I could build a drive line with parts bought at mcmaster however, I don't know how strong, what size universal joints, ect.

If you're willing to build one with me, I'll supply the cost of the parts obviously, beer and food.

Hulk
01-04-2010, 11:25 AM
If you get down the hill, you could stop by Englewood Driveshaft. I bet they would measure everything and fab you up a new shaft for $250 or less. It would be top notch work, too.

Blackdiamond72
01-04-2010, 11:31 AM
I agree they do great work, and I have no problem driving down the hill (everything is ...down....the...hill) however, I feel they would way overbuild it and I would be paying for something that isn't required. Also, these pto winches have a sheer pin in them anyways right?

Can I build one for less than 250?

MDH33
01-04-2010, 11:34 AM
The PTO driveline has a carrier bearing, and the input/slip shaft that fits into the PTO might be difficult to match. I can take some pics of mine and post them up for reference since it's off right now.

MDH33
01-04-2010, 01:18 PM
Some pics:

Here is the winch end. If you already have the input shaft and carrier bearing, it will be much easier to build since you'll just need the flanges, ujoints and shaft. The carrier bearing attaches to the frame, the shaft is what passes through the front cross member.

http://mdhuber.smugmug.com/photos/757353290_LMFwE-L.jpg

The end of the shaft (sorry, blurry, but 10 splines):

http://mdhuber.smugmug.com/photos/757353907_odYwB-L.jpg

Here's the TC side showing the flanges and ujoint:

http://mdhuber.smugmug.com/photos/757354238_sehpB-L.jpg
http://mdhuber.smugmug.com/photos/757354531_6BRNg-L.jpg

The shaft is 1" diameter and 44.5" length from the centers of the ujoints (stock 3 speed trans/TC):

http://mdhuber.smugmug.com/photos/757355129_MVgoE-L.jpg

Hope that helps. Let me know if you need any other specs.

SteveH
01-09-2010, 07:56 AM
The biggest problem with having a driveshaft shop make you a new PTO d-shaft is that they will require the flanges at both ends. Those are a part they cannot fab.

You can make a straight PTO driveshaft and skip the carrier bearing. I have done this twice with FJ40/45s, and the winch works just fine. It's probably not as smooth and quiet as a factory setup. Also, if you find a 3-speed PTO driveshaft, it will be 4" too short if installed in a 4-speed era 'cruiser. I lengthened my PTO shaft with a custom-turned shaft made from steel bar stock. Worked great. HTH - Steve

MDH33
01-09-2010, 08:17 AM
You can make a straight PTO driveshaft and skip the carrier bearing. I have done this twice with FJ40/45s, and the winch works just fine. It's probably not as smooth and quiet as a factory setup.

wouldn't it be sloppy and contact the inside of the front cross member?

SteveH
01-11-2010, 10:02 AM
Martin,

Good observation.

On one or both of my trucks, I installed a thin sheet of brass shim stock between the dshaft and the flange, right where the shear pin goes through. It tightened up the joint and lasted just fine for many years (and through about 6 broken shear pins). You are correct that the front fitting (by design) would be sloppy without a shim of some sort. It was not so sloppy that it would have contacted the front cross member - but enough to be noisy, etc.

In a perfect world, you'd use the carrier bearing piece - but I've never had it come together that way on my trucks.

Blackdiamond72
01-11-2010, 11:05 AM
So what I'm hearing is that I should look for a complete driveshaft assembly from a doner cruiser otherwise it'll vibrate and be very loud? I guess I'm not overly upset about loudness, the 2f makes enough as is, however vibration could be bad for other components as well.

Hulk, I called englewood driveshaft and they told me they would have to see it, but probably between 100 and 225. I don't know if they would be able to connect to the drive flanges with stock parts, so maybe would have to make custom?

Also, I asked on mud but no one responded. My winch looks like an old ramsey 101 but says its a "Rhino Winch" manufactured in Japan. Could someone shed some light on this? I'll try to get pictures up later today, at work. Thanks yall.

subzali
01-11-2010, 12:04 PM
did you post in the winching/recovery section of IH8MUD?

Blackdiamond72
01-11-2010, 12:15 PM
Not yet, good idea though.

SteveH
01-11-2010, 02:24 PM
Recall that PTO winch drivelines don't spin at high RPMs, so you don't need a driveshaft with super-grade balance and precision. If you shift the trans into 4th, you can get some serious shaft speed, but it's not realistic for winching.

I lengthened mine 4" and just eyeballed the straightness and it turned out just fine.