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FJBRADY
01-11-2010, 08:55 AM
So the time has come that I need to source a vehicle for my daughter and I am looking for opinions.

My ex-life errr ex-wife (lover of all things Jeep) thinks a 1995 Cherokee will fit the bill. I on the other hand am thinking import auto.....so there's the rub. Budget is sub 5K

Thoughts? Experiences? Pitfalls?

theboomboom
01-11-2010, 09:26 AM
I would say her opinion should come first, I've seen many a fair young maiden abuse the vehicle her parents forced her in to having. Furthermore, if you want to get a vehicle that will have any sort of resale value at all, also do some research on vehicles with cheap and readily available replacement panels. Heeps are very popular among high school aged kids, but by the time kids get to college they've mostly wrecked those and are driving some sort of beater. Imports are generally more reliable and they usually get better mileage, domestics are cheaper so you can expect to get better bang for your buck with the initial purchase. I would have to say based on the criteria of reliability, availability and safety, you can't go wrong with most of the 4Runners that are selling for around $5k. And for the love of all things Toyota, get her one with a handshaker to distract her from texting while driving.

60wag
01-11-2010, 09:45 AM
When faced with a similar decision, I started with Corollas and Mazda 626s but was really unimpressed especially with an auto tranny. What I settled on was a '99 Saab 9-3. With Saabs uncertain future, most people will steer clear of them but the resale value already sucks so you can pick up a nice car for not much money. Plus there aren't many cars out there with front and side airbags for under 5k$.

nuclearlemon
01-11-2010, 09:46 AM
raffle vehicle for 2010 is a cherokee:D

FJBRADY
01-11-2010, 09:50 AM
And for the love of all things Toyota, get her one with a handshaker to distract her from texting while driving.

Good thinking :thumb:

When faced with a similar decision, I started with Corollas and Mazda 626s but was really unimpressed especially with an auto tranny. What I settled on was a '99 Saab 9-3. With Saabs uncertain future, most people will steer clear of them but the resale value already sucks so you can pick up a nice car for not much money. Plus there aren't many cars out there with front and side airbags for under 5k$.

Had not thought of Saab........I will check that out!

raffle vehicle for 2010 is a cherokee:D

Always selling tickets aren't you Ige :D

Blackdiamond72
01-11-2010, 09:58 AM
I will second the Saab idea. My third car, (college time) was a saab 900s, the non turbo model. It had its issues, such as a clogged injector, and rust behind the right rear door. The things I loved about it were it still got around 26mpg driving up campus hills all the time, it handled wonderfully, good in snow due to its weight, and it saved my life when I was hit on the drivers side around 25 mph from a drunk driver. Car was totalled however I bought it back from the insurance company, parted out the still running engine, lots of body parts, heated seats, ect and made my money back both from the insurance company and from my initial purchase. Besides, with saab going away, your daughter will have the coolness factor! Good luck:thumb:

wesintl
01-11-2010, 10:03 AM
hard to beat a jetta tdi for milage and safety (side air curtains etc). The type 4 are 5-6k depending on milage.

rover67
01-11-2010, 10:19 AM
Hondas tend to be super reliable and for 5k you could find a really nice one.

I got the opportunity to drive a 200 cherokee sport and was really unimpressed with the quality....

Jacket
01-11-2010, 10:38 AM
Consider insurance as well. Cherokee insurance would probably be higher than a car, especially if the Cherokee is 4wd.

What about an older Subaru? Not that cool for a teen, I guess....

Blackdiamond72
01-11-2010, 11:14 AM
If she goes out of state for college, you could buy her any old car, slap a bunch of skiing stickers on the back, couple that with the colo plate and she'll be cool. Old subaru or not.

Red_Chili
01-11-2010, 11:28 AM
Teen + affordable vehicle = $0 resale value. Write it off... it will be toast. If not totalled.

Give her a budget. Then take her shopping. Teach her the negotiating regimen, how to have the vehicle checked, what to watch out for with salesmen... let her take the lead. Let her pick the car, offer advice pro and con and let her decide. Teach her about maintenance costs, pros and cons of warrantees/service contracts, insurance costs by vehicle... everything.

Not only will you have taught her some valuable lessons (how to fish, versus just a fish) she will value the vehicle more.

She will value you more too.

leiniesred
01-11-2010, 11:30 AM
High MPGs, zero, or deferrable maintenance, cheap insurance, and lots of space. This means an underpowered station wagon. I just don't think Subaru has the reliability a college kid needs.

Volvo station wagon. Boxy, but good.

rover67
01-11-2010, 11:51 AM
High MPGs, zero, or deferrable maintenance, cheap insurance, and lots of space. This means an underpowered station wagon. I just don't think Subaru has the reliability a college kid needs.

Volvo station wagon. Boxy, but good.

Old volvo would be good. Those were reliable. A buddy of mine has had one for years and it still keeps going.

corsair23
01-11-2010, 12:07 PM
Lots of opinions...Here is what worked for me and my folks way back when

I was allowed to pick out the vehicle but I had to pay for it, gas, insurance, and maintenance. They co-signed on the loan. So, price suddenly became a concern for me (I was spending my own money, not someone elses) and taking care of it was as much of a priority as it could be for any 16yo kid.

I bought a '77 Subaru wagon. Yeah, it was not a chick magnet but it was my car. It wasn't fast but got decent mpg and it had 4WD (both high and low :)) and I actually wheeled it (ripped off the stock exhaust on Sugarloaf Mountain).

A strange thing about kids...They tend to take better care of stuff they have to pay for than stuff given to them...Worked for me anyway and definitely taught me the value of money :thumb:

When I graduated HS my parents bought me a nicer vehicle as a graduation present. I received a scholarship to attend college so they didn't have to help with tuition and this was part of the "deal"...A 1982 Toyota SR5 pickup :D - no way had they bought that truck for me when I was 16 would I have taken near as good of care of it as I did just 2 years later after having bought, paid for, and maintained my first car on my own.

I think how :cool: it would be now that I am a parent to get my kids a really cool car when they are old enough but I think I will follow my parent's path on it.

FJBRADY
01-11-2010, 01:12 PM
All good stuff, thanks everybody.

She is planning on kicking in around $1K and her mother and I will split the balance. It's not the upfront cost that worries me it is the ongoing cost, fuel, insurance, maintenance that she will have to take care of on her own.....I would also like to see this car get her through college.

Call me crazy, but it does not sound like a Jeep to me!

SteveH
01-11-2010, 01:22 PM
If you have $5K, and are considering a 4Runner, get a 3rd gen ('96 and later). Big improvement over 2nd gen, IMO. Old Cherokees are decently reliable, but are tinny/weak and don't do well in accidents - just not much there with the unibody and no air bags.

Steve

Cheeseman
01-11-2010, 01:29 PM
Huh, I'm in the same request mode only for a Junior in College. He hasn't had as much good luck with jobs as I would like but never the less they come to the WELL for help. He needs to carry some band equipment also. But these same questions apply. Interesting that these lessons just repeat themselves. I agree with Red Chili and Corsair, make it a life long lesson.
________
Amatuer Xxx (http://www.****tube.com/)

Bikeman
01-11-2010, 01:32 PM
Steve, the best cars for my wife's twin sisters in High school were Toyota-made Geo prisms.

I will warn you to stay away from anything European, regardless what anyone says.

wesintl
01-11-2010, 01:34 PM
I will warn you to stay away from anything European, regardless what anyone says.

yeah but then it wouldn't be a life long lesson. :lmao:

Air Randy
01-11-2010, 03:22 PM
Lots of opinions...Here is what worked for me and my folks way back when

I was allowed to pick out the vehicle but I had to pay for it, gas, insurance, and maintenance. They co-signed on the loan. So, price suddenly became a concern for me (I was spending my own money, not someone elses) and taking care of it was as much of a priority as it could be for any 16yo kid.

I bought a '77 Subaru wagon. Yeah, it was not a chick magnet but it was my car. It wasn't fast but got decent mpg and it had 4WD (both high and low :)) and I actually wheeled it (ripped off the stock exhaust on Sugarloaf Mountain).

A strange thing about kids...They tend to take better care of stuff they have to pay for than stuff given to them...Worked for me anyway and definitely taught me the value of money :thumb:

When I graduated HS my parents bought me a nicer vehicle as a graduation present. I received a scholarship to attend college so they didn't have to help with tuition and this was part of the "deal"...A 1982 Toyota SR5 pickup :D - no way had they bought that truck for me when I was 16 would I have taken near as good of care of it as I did just 2 years later after having bought, paid for, and maintained my first car on my own.

I think how :cool: it would be now that I am a parent to get my kids a really cool car when they are old enough but I think I will follow my parent's path on it.

X100 I can't emphasize enough the importance of teaching them the value of what they're getting. I did essentially all of the same things described above with my kids and I set the budget low. If the kid wanted something a little nicer then I loaned it to them and made them a payment book for it. The pay back was a combination of monthly payments and high grades.

I also would say don't get any type of 4x4. Too much temptation for abuse and a higher center of gravity than a newer driver should have to deal with. Go with an american or japanese economy vehilce, get onw with AWD if you're concerned about weather.

I always got my daughters subaru station wagons. Great mileage, excellent reliability and AWD and we usually bought them once they had 150K+ miles on them. I usually put a timing belt, cv joints on the front axle, new tires & brakes and an oil change. After that I never spent a penny on them except for crash damage.

Hulk
01-11-2010, 04:25 PM
I always got my daughters subaru station wagons. Great mileage, excellent reliability and AWD and we usually bought them once they had 150K+ miles on them. I usually put a timing belt, cv joints on the front axle, new tires & brakes and an oil change. After that I never spent a penny on them except for crash damage.

Randy, this is great advice. I'm going to keep this in mind for my kids (who are still 7.5 years away from driver's license obtain-ability). I wrecked my first car pretty bad because I was running terrible tires. I used to buy them used from the junkyard. I couldn't afford a set of new tires. I like the idea of getting the basic maintenance done right at the beginning, so they car is safe.

Of course, my kids will do much of the work themselves, just as I did. My Dad taught my sister to change a tire and change her oil. She's more adept with tools than her husband.

Air Randy
01-11-2010, 04:34 PM
Randy, this is great advice. I'm going to keep this in mind for my kids (who are still 7.5 years away from driver's license obtain-ability). I wrecked my first car pretty bad because I was running terrible tires. I used to buy them used from the junkyard. I couldn't afford a set of new tires. I like the idea of getting the basic maintenance done right at the beginning, so they car is safe.

Of course, my kids will do much of the work themselves, just as I did. My Dad taught my sister to change a tire and change her oil. She's more adept with tools than her husband.

Excellent points. It's always wise to teach your kids basic maintenance, if for no other reason to help them avoid being taken advantage of by unreputable mechanics.