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bh4rnnr
01-26-2010, 08:31 PM
My list seems to grow bigger every week or so....

Currently i'm reading "Some Dreams Die" (ISBN10: 0-942688-01-5, ISBN13: 978-942688-01-6) by Greg Thompson ( thinking about putting a trip together to search out some of the lost Spanish mines), next up: "House of Rain" (ISBN: 978-0-316-60817-6) by Craig Childs, A look into the ancient world of the Anasazi's or "Ancestral Puebloan". Need to read by April 2nd:D:cool:. Continuing with the list: "Stones into Schools" (ISBN:978-0-670-02115-4) by Greg Mortenson, "Out of the Dust" ( ISBN13: 978-1-55517-893-2. ISBN 10: 1-55517-893-6) , Utah's Lost Minse and Hidden Treasures by Stephen B. Shaffer, "Historic Photos of Colorado Mining" (ISBN: 978-1-59652-535-1), Text and Captions by Ed Rains (One of many books purchased to help with this years project:) ).

Let the learning begin:D:bowdown:

:beer::beer:

subzali
01-26-2010, 08:41 PM
Those sound like good books Perry

Recently finished:
Death, Daring and Disaster by Butch Farabee, Jr. - about Search and Rescue in National Parks
Citadel Mountain by Maynard Adams - about a French expedition to southern Colorado around the time of the Louisiana Purchase that mined gold but only one made it out to tell the story...the gold is still there somewhere.
The Last Lecture by Randy Pausch - lecture given by a professor who found out he had cancer and only had a few months left to live

Currently:
Walking from East to West by Ravi Zacharias - autobiography of world-famous Christian theologian and religious philosopher
The Purpose Driven Life by Rick Warren - book about Christian living and worldview written by a pastor and theologian

bh4rnnr
01-26-2010, 08:53 PM
Those sound like good books Perry

Recently finished:

Citadel Mountain by Maynard Adams - about a French expedition to southern Colorado around the time of the Louisiana Purchase that mined gold but only one made it out to tell the story...the gold is still there somewhere.


Do they talk about a Anasazi Dwelling at all? I've seen that name before.

Glad to see your getting some good reading in:cool:

subzali
01-26-2010, 09:03 PM
nope...

Romer
01-26-2010, 09:45 PM
David Baldacci Stone Cold. Just finished it on the plane from Baltimore to Dallas

Uncle Ben
01-26-2010, 10:04 PM
Those sound like good books Perry

Recently finished:
Death, Daring and Disaster by Butch Farabee, Jr. - about Search and Rescue in National Parks
Citadel Mountain by Maynard Adams - about a French expedition to southern Colorado around the time of the Louisiana Purchase that mined gold but only one made it out to tell the story...the gold is still there somewhere.
The Last Lecture by Randy Pausch - lecture given by a professor who found out he had cancer and only had a few months left to live

Currently:
Walking from East to West by Ravi Zacharias - autobiography of world-famous Christian theologian and religious philosopher
The Purpose Driven Life by Rick Warren - book about Christian living and worldview written by a pastor and theologian


Citadel is actually in North-Western Colorado! Phenomenal Elk hunting on top....too bad the perimeter is all private and access will cost you $'s!

Uncle Ben
01-26-2010, 10:06 PM
Read a interesting section in the new 4 Wheel Sport Ute this afternoon! :lmao:

Snowrun
01-26-2010, 10:11 PM
4-Wheeler's Bible by Jim Allen. Pretty good for noobs.

Red_Chili
01-26-2010, 10:27 PM
Saw Tombstone again for New Years, so I decided I wanted to know the true stories.

Doc Holliday: a Family Portrait, by Karen Holliday Tanner. Just finished.
Inventing Wyatt Earp. Current. Used hardcover.
I Married Wyatt Earp, by Josephine Marcus ('Josie' in the movie, Tombstone). Should be here soon, bought used.

a couple Dean Koontz done and one in the hopper (The Face). That's the last couple months.

corsair23
01-27-2010, 12:25 AM
Go Dog Go and numerous other Dr Seuss titles

:)

60wag
01-27-2010, 05:52 AM
The Tipping Point by Malcolm Gladwell. Similar to Blink, it has some great observations on human trends.

subzali
01-27-2010, 06:58 AM
Citadel is actually in North-Western Colorado! Phenomenal Elk hunting on top....too bad the perimeter is all private and access will cost you $'s!

Maybe there's two of them - this one is located right near Wolf Creek Pass, and is also called Treasure Mountain.

One of the few advantages of living in a hotel and not being allowed to work overtime...:rolleyes:

Bighead
01-27-2010, 07:23 AM
Patriots: The Men Who Started the American Revolution - A.J. Languth (http://search.barnesandnoble.com/Patriots/A-J-Langguth/e/9780671675622/?itm=1&USRI=patriots+languth)

Killing Rommel - Stephen Pressfield (http://search.barnesandnoble.com/Killing-Rommel/Steven-Pressfield/e/9780767926164/?itm=1&USRI=killing+rommel)

RockRunner
01-27-2010, 08:23 AM
A pirate looks at fifty

Suprise......suprise it is a book Jimmy Buffett wrote:D. His life stories and expierences, also a great deal about the history of the Keys.

Captain Tony's Life Lessons of a Legend

This book covers his whole life and it also covers the Keys with an emphesis on Key West. He has done it all in his life, from smugling drugs to being the Mayor of Key West. We were lucky enough to meet Captain Tony and share a few beers with him years ago. He told us stories that seemed to good to be true but then to read them in his book again was a great feeling. :)

Perry, did you see the news yesterday about these guys who hunt for meteorites? I think that is what you should do when you go on your trips. They are worth more than gold:eek:

I think they are going to cover it on HDnet or Discovery channel.

Red_Chili
01-27-2010, 08:27 AM
Oh I forgot... (no peanut gallery comments on that please :lmao:)

Too Soon Old, Too Late Smart. GREAT book.

rover67
01-27-2010, 08:34 AM
The Tipping Point by Malcolm Gladwell. Similar to Blink, it has some great observations on human trends.

That one was fun, I read it a while back and like to reference it when talking about random carpola. I dug it a lot.

I have been slack on reading lately. I read "Where Men Win Glory: The Odyssey of Pat Tillman" when it came out. Interesting Krakauer story on the war and how it's used as a political tool.

"Stiff: The Curious Lives of Human Cadavers" by Mary Roach is also a fun one if you are interested in medicine and how the study of the human body has progressed over the years. It's one of the last ones that I read that I really liked a lot. Don't think I'm a sicko till you read it, it's not what you think. truly facinating.


the rest aren't worth noting.

AxleIke
01-27-2010, 08:40 AM
A people's history of the United States by Howard Zinn.

I'll put it this way: If you ever feel yourself getting overly patriotic, this book will be a good medicine. Down right depressing at times.

Red_Chili
01-27-2010, 09:48 AM
No wonder it's depressing you.
http://hnn.us/articles/1493.html
Who is the most influential historian in America? Could it be Pulitzer Prize winners Arthur Schlesinger, Jr. or Joseph Ellis or David McCullough, whose scholarly works have reached a broad literary public? The answer is none of the above. The accolade belongs instead to the unreconstructed, anti-American Marxist Howard Zinn, whose cartoon anti-history of the United States is still selling 128,000 copies a year twenty years after its original publication.
:lmao:
Ya need to read other schtuff too!


“Objectivity is impossible,” Zinn once remarked, “and it is also undesirable. That is, if it were possible it would be undesirable, because if you have any kind of a social aim, if you think history should serve society in some way; should serve the progress of the human race; should serve justice in some way, then it requires that you make your selection on the basis of what you think will advance causes of humanity.”
That's the definition of advocacy history (and journalism too, BTW).

I do understand the value of postmodern thought in puncturing the illusion of rationalistic objectivity - such objectivity not only defies what we know about phenomenology, it goes against what quantum mechanics is discovering - but this goes waaaaaaaaay beyond that.

Jacket
01-27-2010, 10:18 AM
Go Dog Go and numerous other Dr Seuss titles

:)

I thought your kids were older than that.......hmmmm.

But along those lines...re-reading Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone to the kids. And we dabble a bit in Captain Underpants and Franny Stein, Mad Scientist.

Cheeseman
01-27-2010, 10:38 AM
Two books on Norman Rockwell - just finished
A Sword for Mother Nature - Terry Grosz - currently reading
No Safe Refuge - Terry Grosz - next someday
Ranches book - John Fielder
Photograhping Nature - John Fielder - currently reading
James K. Polk - The Man Who changed the Presidency and America - Walter Borneman

Oh yah, The Trailsman series, #43. Been reading this one for years.

Rockwell is the greatest and I finally understand how and why he did what he did.
Met Terry Grosz at the International Sportsmans show. A retired 30 some year federal fish and game warden. He wrote the stories of all is times, about6 various books I believe. Saw Fielder at the Bemis library a couple of Fridays ago and got him to sign all my books and bought a couple of new ones. I can never read enough on photography. But the James K. Polk book has me intrigued. He set the west to being open for all as I understand it. should be good.
________
Ship Sale (http://ship-sale.com/)

rover67
01-27-2010, 10:44 AM
forgot "the art of racing in the rain" that was a good one I actually finished a few weeks ago as well. I'd recommend that one.

not what it seems like it is from the title..

Mendocino
01-27-2010, 11:05 AM
Deals from Hell: M&A Lessons that Rise Above the Ashes (http://www.amazon.com/Deals-Hell-Lessons-Above-Ashes/dp/0471395951)

AxleIke
01-27-2010, 11:11 AM
No wonder it's depressing you.
http://hnn.us/articles/1493.html

:lmao:
Ya need to read other schtuff too!


That's the definition of advocacy history (and journalism too, BTW).

I do understand the value of postmodern thought in puncturing the illusion of rationalistic objectivity - such objectivity not only defies what we know about phenomenology, it goes against what quantum mechanics is discovering - but this goes waaaaaaaaay beyond that.

Meh, I've read other stuff. This is a refreshingly different take, and IMO, quite good.

His socialist trappings are easy to identify, and avoid if you wish. This isn't really one of his "become a socialist" books. Its simply a more realistic view of Americain History: The rich crapping on the poor, over, and over again. He does try to make a point of leading the reader to conclude that a different form of government might have produced a different history, but again, its easy to ignore.

I've always known that capitalism works so well because it is based on the fact that, as humans, we are all out for ourselves, and we'll step on whoever, and betray anyone to get to the top. Zinn makes the point ad naseum in his book, which isn't why I'm reading. I could care less about his political agenda.

It is nice to step outside the normal view of our history, that of heroic founding fathers, and a fair, almost utopian, society, and visit the darker side of our history.

timmbuck2
01-27-2010, 11:18 AM
Hmm....read a VERY depressing statistic yesterday...said only 30% of people *ever* read a book cover to cover after they graduate high school. I would like to see the research on that for verification, but it feels like a relatively true statement. Very sad...

Been averaging a couple of books a week lately, mostly reading about how disgusting our food really is, and reading about how to scale up my gardening to provide healthy food for more people...I probably should start a thread on the Politics Forum...but our food supply is downright scary...


Everything I Want To Do Is Illegal - Joel Salatin (http://www.amazon.com/Everything-Want-Do-Illegal-Stories/dp/0963810952/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1264615728&sr=8-3)

Holy Cows and Hog Heaven - Joel Salatin (http://www.amazon.com/Holy-Cows-Hog-Heaven-Friendly/dp/0963810944/ref=sr_1_6?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1264615728&sr=8-6)

Omnivore's Dilemma - Michael Pollan (http://www.amazon.com/Omnivores-Dilemma-Natural-History-Meals/dp/1594200823/ref=sr_1_5?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1264615899&sr=8-5) (read this last year but reading the Young Reader's edition with Olivia, Amber's oldest daughter)

Food, Inc. - ~Eric Schlosser, various others (http://www.amazon.com/Food-Inc-Participant-Industrial-Poorer/dp/1586486942/ref=pd_sim_b_10)

Just Food: Where Locavores Get It Wrong - James McWilliams (http://www.amazon.com/Just-Food-Where-Locavores-Responsibly/dp/031603374X/ref=pd_sim_b_30) I love to read the opposite viewpoint when I am learning about new ideas, and his "opposite" viewpoint is not all that different, but brought up some very interesting ideas I had not considered.

Wolf at the Table: Memoir of my Father - Augusten Burroughs (http://www.amazon.com/Wolf-Table-Memoir-My-Father/dp/B002VPE6XE/ref=ntt_at_ep_dpi_4)

Some "boring" books on Organic Gardening by Elliot Coleman, Raising Chickens, and random business books.

Did I mention my new house is across he street from the library, and I think I have 27 books checked out right now?

Of course at bedtime I read a LOT of Dr. Seuss and Clifford...

ElliottB
01-27-2010, 11:22 AM
Histophysiology, medical physiology, immunology, and other assorted text books. I wouldn't be opposed to the authors throwing in a little murder mystery to liven things up. :rolleyes:

ElliottB
01-27-2010, 11:24 AM
Been averaging a couple of books a week lately, mostly reading about how disgusting our food really is, and reading about how to scale up my gardening to provide healthy food for more people...I probably should start a thread on the Politics Forum...but our food supply is downright scary...



Check out the documentary "Food Inc."

As unnerving as it is, I still have no misgivings about eating a Big Mac.

timmbuck2
01-27-2010, 11:28 AM
Check out the documentary "Food Inc."

As unnerving as it is, I still have no misgivings about eating a Big Mac.

I have not seen it yet. I still have no problems eating meat, but greatly prefer eating it from other, more humane and more nutritious and safer sources. Better to take this to the political forum, don't want to hijack this thread!!

"Death on a Family Farm" is a very interesting documentary on HBO right now also.

Also read this after seeing the show "100 Mile Diet" on Planet Green.
Plenty - Alisa Smith (http://www.amazon.com/Plenty-Woman-Raucous-Eating-Locally/dp/030734732X/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1264616877&sr=8-3)

DaveInDenver
01-27-2010, 12:47 PM
It is nice to step outside the normal view of our history, that of heroic founding fathers, and a fair, almost utopian, society, and visit the darker side of our history.
You might consider a few other books, then. These take the non-mainstream view on the subjects. Lincoln for one benefits greatly from popular revisionist history (the cult of Lincoln as it's referred).

"Lincoln Unmasked" by Tom DiLorenzo
"A Century of War" by John Denson
"Defending the Undefendable" by Walter Block
"Churchill, Hitler and the Unnecessary War" by Pat Buchanan
"Hamilton's Curse" by Tom DiLorenzo
"Reassessing the Presidency" collection of essays edited by John Denson

AxleIke
01-27-2010, 01:12 PM
Thanks Dave!

Lincoln isn't too nicely portray'd in Zinn's book either.

The next book on my shelf is "The Road to Montecello". A bit of a look at TJ for a while. I'll look into those books you mentioned too, though I may need to read some from the "other side of the fence" for a bit to pick my spirits back up! :D

MDH33
01-27-2010, 01:12 PM
Books?? Like the kind that used to be made out of paper?? sooo 2009... :rolleyes:

http://images.appleinsider.com/appletabletb440.jpg

Why open a book when you can download and read them on your $500 battery powered device?

Red_Chili
01-27-2010, 01:24 PM
Why open a book when you can download and read them on your $500 battery powered device?
:lmao:
:cheers:

bh4rnnr
01-27-2010, 05:21 PM
nope...

Sounds like Citadel was a popular name. Here is the one I was talking about:blah:

Looks to be some good reading, will have to remember this thread when I get caught up:)

:beer::beer:

subzali
01-27-2010, 06:30 PM
Martin, I don't know about you but the screen hurts my eyes...

Perry, yes me too...:cheers:

MDH33
01-27-2010, 09:00 PM
Martin, I don't know about you but the screen hurts my eyes...

Yeah, hurts my wallet too as it's basically going to put me out of business. All of the publishers are scrambling to abandon paper text books for e-books that are being almost exclusively assembled overseas with labor willing to work for 3¢ on the dollar... :(

nakman
01-28-2010, 09:39 AM
currently reading "No BS Business Success (http://www.amazon.com/No-B-S-Business-Success-NO/dp/1932531106)" by Dan Kennedy.

FJBRADY
01-28-2010, 10:24 AM
Nothing at the moment, but SI swimsuit edition very soon:grinpimp:

rockcrawlincandi
01-28-2010, 11:41 AM
I read all the Harry Potter books. Took me two weeks. May be childish but they were really enjoyable. Luckily I didn't have to buy them. A friend of mine has the whole series and insisted I read all the books. I'm glad I have a friend from London becuase some of the text needed translation.

Hulk
01-29-2010, 12:55 AM
A people's history of the United States by Howard Zinn.

He just died. (http://www.boston.com/news/local/breaking_news/2010/01/howard_zinn_his.html?p1=Well_MostPop_Emailed2) It may have been the same day as J.D. Salinger.

timmbuck2
02-02-2010, 09:52 AM
Seeds of Deception - Jeffrey M. Smith (http://www.amazon.com/Seeds-Deception-Government-Genetically-Engineered/dp/0972966587/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1265129503&sr=8-1)

Wow. I will never look at an FDA recommendation the same way again...

subzali
02-03-2010, 06:47 PM
Just started The Millionaire Next Door by Thomas J. Stanley, Ph.D. and William D. Danko, Ph.D.

rockcrawlincandi
02-07-2010, 10:01 AM
I'm reading 'Methland' by: Nick Reding. So far, I'm unimpressed. It's hardly engaging. It does give facts about what meth can do to small towns. However, I've read two chapters so far and just can't get into it. I will try again to read what I feel is an overly descriptive, "know it all" book. Maybe the rest of the book is more productive than the begining.

SRT08BUS
02-07-2010, 03:01 PM
I'm reading 'Methland' by: Nick Reding. So far, I'm unimpressed. It's hardly engaging. It does give facts about what meth can do to small towns. However, I've read two chapters so far and just can't get into it. I will try again to read what I feel is an overly descriptive, "know it all" book. Maybe the rest of the book is more productive than the begining.

I think when it comes 2 meth a book is kinda putting a little 2 much work in 2 what can be said in a sentence, " Meth is bad".

rockcrawlincandi
02-07-2010, 07:00 PM
I think when it comes 2 meth a book is kinda putting a little 2 much work in 2 what can be said in a sentence, " Meth is bad".

I agree.

MountainMan
02-07-2010, 08:58 PM
http://www.goodreads.com/review/list/1090178

subzali
02-21-2010, 02:35 PM
had some flying to do this past weekend, finished Tom Stanley's The Millionaire Next Door and Dave Ramsey's More Than Enough. Both good reads in my opinion, More Than Enough was not much different from Dave Ramsey's Financial Peace though. Moving on to Tom Stanley's The Millionaire Mind. I will be getting off this money/financial kick shortly and moving on to other subjects...not that I've exhausted all there is in the money/financial area...

Mendocino
02-21-2010, 03:33 PM
had some flying to do this past weekend, finished Tom Stanley's The Millionaire Next Door and Dave Ramsey's More Than Enough. Both good reads in my opinion, More Than Enough was not much different from Dave Ramsey's Financial Peace though. Moving on to Tom Stanley's The Millionaire Mind. I will be getting off this money/financial kick shortly and moving on to other subjects...not that I've exhausted all there is in the money/financial area...

The Millionaire Mind and the Millionaire Next Door were great reads.:thumb:

rover67
02-21-2010, 07:06 PM
I just started under the Banner of Heaven during my travels this weekend. Yikes.

ScaldedDog
02-21-2010, 10:41 PM
Finished "Up in the Air" this morning - on a plane, of course. For once, I liked the movie better than the book. Some funny lines in it, though.

Mark

LETSROLL
02-22-2010, 12:05 AM
Just finished reading Going Rogue (Sarah Palin). All politics aside, it was interesting to hear about rural alaska and the way political campaigns handle the candidates.

fubuki
02-22-2010, 06:24 AM
Recently finished Niall Ferguson's The Ascent of Money (http://www.amazon.com/Ascent-Money-Financial-History-World/dp/0143116177/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1266844625&sr=1-1). Great book. I'm currently reading Naomi Klein's The Shock Doctrine (http://www.amazon.com/Shock-Doctrine-Rise-Disaster-Capitalism/dp/0312427999/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1266844867&sr=1-1). Equally as good.

MountainMan
02-22-2010, 08:07 AM
just finished this, GREAT BOOK, i know understand the Battle of Gettysburg better than ever before. Highly recommend.

http://www.amazon.com/Killer-Angels-Michael-Shaara/dp/034540727X/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1266851223&sr=8-1

subzali
02-23-2010, 05:41 PM
I just started under the Banner of Heaven during my travels this weekend. Yikes.

I enjoyed that book, and think it was fairly well documented. I have come to understand that a lot of people do not like Jon Krakauer, but I thought it was a fairly unbiased read. But what do I know...

Snowrun
03-07-2010, 11:28 AM
Who Needs a Road by Harold Stephans and Albert Podell. It makes me really want to buy an FJ-40.

subzali
03-16-2010, 06:56 AM
I'm continuing to blaze through them...

They say that in 10 years you will be the same person you are today except for the books you read and the people you meet. I wish I would have read these two books (one I just finished, the other I just started) back in high school...luckily I was able to stumble my way into an awesome marriage! :D

When God Writes Your Love Story by Eric and Leslie Ludy
I Kissed Dating Goodbye by Joshua Harris

leiniesred
03-16-2010, 08:51 AM
Riddley Walker by Russell Hoban. ISBN 0-253-33448-9

Maybe 1000 years post apocolypse England. Written in pseduo english that has been degraded by 1000 years of illiteracy. This makes reading it more of a translation. The intent is to slow the reader down to get him or her to think about the ideas presented.
After about 50% of the book, the translations are coming more or less automatically in my mind. None-the-less, I think this is the most challenging text I've read for pleasure.

Example of the text:

I said, ‘Youwl lissen us right in to Grabs your Aunty in a minim if we keap on walking don’t you have nothing in mynd?’

DaveInDenver
03-16-2010, 08:57 AM
Example of the text:

I said, ‘Youwl lissen us right in to Grabs your Aunty in a minim if we keap on walking don’t you have nothing in mynd?’
This could easily be a text message found on a teenager's phone today.

simps80
03-16-2010, 01:32 PM
This could easily be a text message found on a teenager's phone today.



that is SOOOOO true
i read that, and actually did "lol"

FJBRADY
03-16-2010, 01:51 PM
http://www.google.com/url?q=http://www.youtube.com/watch%3Fv%3D6fZwMcoDVJM&ei=aOCfS9TuDI-KsgP4ne3SCw&sa=X&oi=video_result&resnum=1&ct=thumbnail&ved=0CAcQuAIwAA&usg=AFQjCNFhoQIvfQCMq-vhfUDhbtVHVvmaKg

rockcrawlincandi
04-21-2010, 02:16 PM
I saw this book at Wal-mart with a very proper lady on the front. However, something was different about her. She had blood all down the front of her dress and half of her face was falling off. I read the cover- Pride and Prejudice and Zombies I bought it and I have to say it is really funny. It goes directly along with the real book. It just has Zombies in it and Elizabeth (main character) is a ruthless warrior that is trained by masters of the Orient. She loves killing zombies and threating others. Great book.

Hulk
04-21-2010, 03:52 PM
I saw this book at Wal-mart with a very proper lady on the front. However, something was different about her. She had blood all down the front of her dress and half of her face was falling off. I read the cover- Pride and Prejudice and Zombies I bought it and I have to say it is really funny. It goes directly along with the real book. It just has Zombies in it and Elizabeth (main character) is a ruthless warrior that is trained by masters of the Orient. She loves killing zombies and threating others. Great book.

Sounds hilarious. I'd have to reread Pride and Prejudice to "get" all the jokes, I'm sure.

corsair23
04-21-2010, 04:41 PM
Sounds hilarious. I'd have to reread Pride and Prejudice to "get" all the jokes, I'm sure.

Matt,

What was that book we listened to on the way to the Rubithon and back? That was some funny sh stuff :D

Hulk
04-22-2010, 12:49 AM
David Sedaris, Dress Your Family in Corduroy and Denim (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0316010790/ref=pd_lpo_k2_dp_sr_2?pf_rd_p=486539851&pf_rd_s=lpo-top-stripe-1&pf_rd_t=201&pf_rd_i=0316776963&pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_r=08P4M8G4AWTCRXY16NQ5). All his stuff is hilarious.

MDH33
04-22-2010, 07:31 AM
I needed something light-hearted and uplifting, so I just read 'The Road' and 'No Country For Old Men' by Cormac McCarthy. Good stuff. The movies were good, but the books were superior.

rockcrawlincandi
04-23-2010, 01:59 PM
Sounds hilarious. I'd have to reread Pride and Prejudice to "get" all the jokes, I'm sure.

Na. Don't bother. Just read the zombie book. I watched the movie and I found myself waiting for certain parts to happen in the book. Which can be annoying. I did however get some of the things that are going on. I couldn't imagine reading the 'real' book. It would seem exteremly boring to me. Zombies just make the book interesting. I like Zombies. Brain eating fools. We should add a zombie eating some brains for a smilie. Ha ha ha.

MDH33
04-23-2010, 02:05 PM
...We should add a zombie eating some brains for a smilie. Ha ha ha.

I'll second the motion.

rockcrawlincandi
04-23-2010, 02:10 PM
I'll second the motion.

If thats one of ours I surely didn't see it. But, when I click on the more button the window won't load. Oh well.

MDH33
04-23-2010, 02:26 PM
If thats one of ours I surely didn't see it. But, when I click on the more button the window won't load. Oh well.

Those aren't in our library, but I agree we should add one. ;)

bh4rnnr
06-13-2010, 07:03 PM
Since my "To read pile" Got put away, I picked up some new books this week:

Drills and Mills: by Will Meyerriecks
To Hell on a Fast Horse: Mark Lee Gardner
A Terrible Glory: James Donovan

And on order is a book on the Sundance Kid:D:bowdown:.

:beer::beer:

rover67
06-13-2010, 09:37 PM
I Just read shackleton's incredible voyage. The story of the 1914 expidition to Antarctica. It was flipping sweet.

Mendocino
06-15-2010, 05:49 PM
This is really interesting read:thumb:

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41xuurPPmFL._SL500_AA300_.jpg

You can read about it here (http://www.amazon.com/Pandoras-Seed-Unforeseen-Cost-Civilization/dp/1400062152/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1276645687&sr=1-1).

bh4rnnr
10-07-2010, 09:53 PM
Just thought i'd give an update. No MTV in this house:p:.

Recently finished reading Greg Mortenson's second book "Stones into Schools". A lost climber turned school builder in Afghanistan. There current plan includes building womens schools deep into Taliban country.

Next up was "Blood and Thunder" by Hampton Side. A great novel about Kit Carson, Americas "Manifest Destiny", the Dine and the battle for the American West.

Currently, i'm reading "Undaunted Courage" by Stephene E. Ambrose. A tale of Lewis and Clark and the opening of the west. I'm forcing myself to finish this book, as next up is:

"Finders Keepers" by Craig Childs. A tale of archaeological plunder and obsession. I had to put this book down the other day as nothing would have gotten done after lunch:eek:. Craig sent my Dad, Brother and myself each a signed copy of this book. Yeah i'm excited:D.

:beer:

Hulk
10-08-2010, 12:24 AM
I just started reading Zeitoun by Dave Eggers. Will report back l8ter.

nattybumppo
10-08-2010, 05:31 PM
Read KOOK by Peter Heller. Fun book about learning to surf while on a road trip to Mexico. All his books are way entertaining in an outdoor-adventure sort of way. Now back to my WW2 studies wit D DAY by Ambrose.

Mendocino
10-08-2010, 05:51 PM
I finished "The General Managers (http://www.amazon.com/General-Managers-John-P-Kotter/dp/0029182301)" by John Kotter. I was really happy that I bought it for $0.01 plus $3.50 shipping. This is old research but it's a classic and the first study of its kind.

I'm also about half way through "Russia After the Global Economic Crisis" by Asland, Guriev, and Kuchins. I know Kuchins (http://csis.org/expert/andrew-c-kuchins) and have found the book excellent. Among other significant historical and prescient insights; the editors provide alternative explanations to Putin's federalist reconstruction that I completely missed. One of my business partners in Russia is also personal friends with Guriev (who is one of Russian President Medvedev's Golden 100 (http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/world/europe/article5786488.ece)) so we have lots of interesting discussions over garlic vodka and frozen Siberian fish.:D

Hulk
10-08-2010, 10:44 PM
Jeff, you operate on a whole 'nother playing field than do I.

Ron Helmuth
10-12-2010, 10:30 PM
just finished reading the book Michael Crichton completed just before his death-"Pirates Latitudes" it starts out strong but the ending is sketchy.

Still would make a great movie all the same. If you like the Caribbean and swashbuckling adventure it is a quick great read.

Author of Coma, The Andromeda Strain and some others. The Great Train Robbery was another one of his I can read over and over.

bh4rnnr
12-27-2010, 10:07 PM
So typical. Walked into Tattered Cover to pick up a book for a white elephant party and come out spending 50$ on books. Just started reading "The secret Knowledge of Water" by Craig Childs (just got a holiday card from him:D). It's about finding water ind the desert. Already a few chapters in:bowdown:. Also picked up "Images of America: Denver's Sixteenth Street". Fun to see the old images of places I walk by everyday:cool:.

Secret Knowledge of Water, ISBN: 1-57061-159-9(hc)

Images of America: Denver's Sixteenth Street; Library of Congress Control Number: 2010922847

:beer:

Rezarf
12-28-2010, 10:14 PM
Currently, i'm reading "Undaunted Courage" by Stephene E. Ambrose. A tale of Lewis and Clark and the opening of the west. I'm forcing myself to finish this book, as next up is:
:beer:

I loved this one, it was epic!

bh4rnnr
07-27-2011, 06:47 PM
Even though i'm only a few chapters in, i'm gonna recomend "One Man's West" by David Lavender. Turning into a great read. Didnt realize that, due to the price of gold, the Camp Bird Mine was open during the 30's.

ISBN#: 13-978-0-8032-6030-6.

The book i'm reading is the third edition.

:beer:

Woodsman
07-27-2011, 10:05 PM
You've got some great suggestions in this thread. I just added "One Man's West" to my Amazon shopping cart.

Red_Chili
07-28-2011, 08:25 AM
A whole different tack... I love service manuals because as we all know, the earn as you learn plan can get expensive and the parts you just broke may be made of unobtainium.

Here are some EXCELLENT, OUTSTANDING user/service manuals I've come across lately in my education!!!

-For Men Only: A Straightforward Guide to the Inner Lives of Women . http://www.amazon.com/Men-Only-Straightforward-Guide-Inner/dp/B0035G04Q6/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1311862287&sr=1-1 Written by a man, to men, in collaboration with his wife. Fiancee concurs he gets it. He has a way of unraveling the spaghetti GPS tracks in a woman's inner life that makes a whole lot of sense to men. And how we get ourselves in a world of hurt trying to do what we think is the common sense right thing. Demystifying and very helpful.

-For Women Only: What You Need to Know about the Inner Lives of Men . http://www.amazon.com/Women-Only-about-Inner-Lives/dp/1590523172/ref=sr_1_3?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1311862287&sr=1-3 The inverse of the above, written by a woman, to women, in collaboration with her husband. I concur SHE gets it! VERY interesting to read a woman's perspective on men that is the polar opposite from slamming. You'll be really glad she read it.

These two books make an excellent study for a couple. I'd recommend setting aside an evening a week to work through them. You're gonna unearth some really interesting dynamics that all of a sudden make perfect sense. Pretty fun too.

-First Comes Love, Then Comes Money. http://www.amazon.com/First-Comes-Love-Then-Money/dp/0061649910/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1311862552&sr=1-1 (Apparently there are a bunch of books with the same title, but this one is the one you want.) Written by a couple of financial planners who are pretty transparent about their own struggles communicating about money. No blaming, just understanding how we get in such tangles about it. It really unwinds any conflict, tension, defensiveness, etc. and stuff starts making sense.

And isn't that really what you want from a good service manual? :lmao:

Jacket
07-28-2011, 09:31 AM
I'm not an avid reader, but I finished this one in 3 days on my recent vacation. INCREDIBLE story of a guy who ran track in the 1936 Olympics, then went to war (WWII in the Pacific). Got shot down in his bomber over the Pacific, survived for 40-something days on a life raft, and then got captured and spent 2+ years in a Japanese POW camp. If ever you feel like your entitled life is difficult, just read what this guy went through and you'll feel pretty good about what you have.

http://www.amazon.com/Unbroken-World-Survival-Resilience-Redemption/dp/0739319698

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51MHfaAobXL._BO2,204,203,200_PIsitb-sticker-arrow-click,TopRight,35,-76_AA300_SH20_OU01_.jpg

Rezarf
07-29-2011, 08:17 PM
Beast in the Garden...

Its about the mountain lions here in Boulder, and was a fantastic read covering the history of the cats here in Colorado from the days of the gold rush and nearly every incident with cats from the late 80's to the mid 90's.

It was awesome.

subzali
08-28-2012, 02:49 PM
Got given Home Game today. Promises to be good.

PabloCruise
08-30-2012, 08:03 AM
Just noticed this thread - great idea!

I just finished Stephen King's 11/22/63 - very enjoyable.

What if you had the opportunity to step back in time and prevent the assassination of JFK?

http://www.amazon.com/11-22-63-Stephen-King/dp/1451627297/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1346335329&sr=1-1&keywords=stephen+king

smslavin
08-30-2012, 09:27 AM
I just finished Stephen King's 11/22/63 - very enjoyable.

That's on my list.

Just finished The Omnivore's Dilemma (http://www.amazon.com/The-Omnivores-Dilemma-Natural-History/dp/0143038583/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1346339701&sr=8-1&keywords=omnivore%27s+dilemma). Great read and eye opening. Currently reading Design Like Apple (http://www.amazon.com/Design-Like-Apple-Principles-Experiences/dp/1118290313/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1346339741&sr=1-1&keywords=design+like+apple), Core Curriculum: Writings on Photography (http://www.amazon.com/Core-Curriculum-Writings-Photography-Aperture/dp/1597111724/ref=pd_bxgy_b_text_y), The Pleasures of Good Photographs (http://www.amazon.com/Pleasures-Good-Photographs-Aperture-Ideas/dp/1597111392/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1346339915&sr=1-1&keywords=pleasures+of+good+photographs) and a bunch of work related code monkey stuff.

Next on my list is Reamde (http://www.amazon.com/Reamde-Novel-Neal-Stephenson/dp/0062191497/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1346340023&sr=1-1&keywords=reamde), Eat & Run (http://www.amazon.com/Eat-Run-Unlikely-Ultramarathon-Greatness/dp/0547569653/ref=wl_it_dp_o_pC_nS_nC?ie=UTF8&colid=3D3G72W5DUQP2&coliid=I103X3B6QEJU71), Existence (http://www.amazon.com/Existence-David-Brin/dp/0765303612/ref=wl_it_dp_o_pdT1_nS_nC?ie=UTF8&colid=3D3G72W5DUQP2&coliid=I3EVVGHSKHV1ES), The Responsible Company (http://www.amazon.com/The-Responsible-Company-Yvon-Chouinard/dp/0980122783/ref=wl_it_dp_o_pC_nS_nC?ie=UTF8&colid=3D3G72W5DUQP2&coliid=IGEQ4WRLZI9B0) and The Lower River (http://www.amazon.com/The-Lower-River-Paul-Theroux/dp/0547746504/ref=wl_it_dp_o_pdT1_nS_nC?ie=UTF8&colid=3D3G72W5DUQP2&coliid=I1OKBQ9764WJP6).

The Boulder Book Store has become a favorite. A little mall wandering, some people watching, dinner at Mountain Sun and some book perusing.

Caribou Sandstorm
10-12-2012, 11:06 AM
Thought a book thread might be a good place to report in on what folks are reading these days.. Maybe there was already a thread but I could not find one. I am always looking for a recommendation on a good book..

I just picked up NO Easy Day, the Navy Seal perspective/account on the Osama Bin Laden kill. So far can't seem to put it down, good read.

Any body else reading this? I am only on page 50 so don't give away the ending...:p:

smslavin
10-12-2012, 11:57 AM
I don't spend a lot of time with fiction but I just finished Neal Stephenson's Reamde. One of his best, great story.

Not sure about No Easy Day. I knew one of the Team 6 guys that was shot down in the chopper crash.

Quite a few things in my "To Read" stack that I need to get to...
Paul Theroux's The Lower River, Yvon Chouinard's The Responsible Company, David Brin's Existence and a bunch of work related stuff that I can't get motivated to read right now.

Overlander
10-12-2012, 12:11 PM
The Creature from Jekyll Island - fascinating (and deeply disturbing at the same time).

subzali
10-12-2012, 12:19 PM
Repost! :hill:
http://risingsun4x4club.org/forum2/showthread.php?t=12018&highlight=books

Caribou Sandstorm
10-12-2012, 12:34 PM
Repost! :hill:
http://risingsun4x4club.org/forum2/showthread.php?t=12018&highlight=books

Thanks Matt! My search skills are lacking..:o

Snowrun
10-12-2012, 01:10 PM
Thought a book thread might be a good place to report in on what folks are reading these days.. Maybe there was already a thread but I could not find one. I am always looking for a recommendation on a good book..

I just picked up NO Easy Day, the Navy Seal perspective/account on the Osama Bin Laden kill. So far can't seem to put it down, good read.

Any body else reading this? I am only on page 50 so don't give away the ending...:p:

Just finished it. It's a pretty good book.

subzali
12-17-2012, 08:18 PM
Now that my commute is 27 miles each way, Jacki has been getting me audio books out of the library...so far I've listened to:

-Colossus, which is about the construction of the Hoover Dam;

-Endeavor, Shackleton's Incredible Voyage. Title says it all. I've heard of Shackleton's voyage and knew pretty much what happened and how it all went, but hearing it told through and through just puts it on a whole different level. Those guys were :eek:

Finally,
-Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee. I'm glad I'm done with this one because it was a sad and upsetting book and I think put me in a bad mood for a few days, especially near the end. Really nice book to tie all the stories together, though, of Crazy Horse, Sitting Bull, Geronimo, Custer and his last stand at Little Bighorn, and many other tribes, chiefs, army commanders and politicians of the time.

Today I started Why the West Rules, For Now. Promises to be a good book. I think on the level of Collapse by Jared Diamond. Soon I hope to listen to Guns, Germs and Steel as well. Pretty good way to spend my 40 minute to hour-long commute I think. Maybe I'll be as smart as DaveinDenver someday ;)

spectre6000
12-17-2012, 08:26 PM
Audel's Automotive Guide from 1972. I believe it was a trade school textbook for auto mechanics. The guy I bought my 40 from was a retired mechanic and thought I would enjoy it. He was right.

Since audiobooks count, I'm waiting for the 5th installment of Dan Carlon's Wrath of the Khans. It's the history audiobook of the Khans and their influence on... Pretty much everything that has happened since.

bh4rnnr
12-17-2012, 08:33 PM
Fun stuff. Currently reading:

Law of the Range. Portraits of old time brand inspectors. Stephen Collector. (B&W photography)

And just picked up:

Butch Cassidy, Beyond the Grave by W.C. Jameson


:beer:

subzali
06-20-2013, 10:41 AM
Now that my commute is 27 miles each way, Jacki has been getting me audio books out of the library...so far I've listened to:

-Colossus, which is about the construction of the Hoover Dam;

-Endeavor, Shackleton's Incredible Voyage. Title says it all. I've heard of Shackleton's voyage and knew pretty much what happened and how it all went, but hearing it told through and through just puts it on a whole different level. Those guys were :eek:

Finally,
-Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee. I'm glad I'm done with this one because it was a sad and upsetting book and I think put me in a bad mood for a few days, especially near the end. Really nice book to tie all the stories together, though, of Crazy Horse, Sitting Bull, Geronimo, Custer and his last stand at Little Bighorn, and many other tribes, chiefs, army commanders and politicians of the time.

Today I started Why the West Rules, For Now. Promises to be a good book. I think on the level of Collapse by Jared Diamond. Soon I hope to listen to Guns, Germs and Steel as well. Pretty good way to spend my 40 minute to hour-long commute I think. Maybe I'll be as smart as DaveinDenver someday ;)

These books were all good picks.

My commute is now 13 miles each way, 30-35 minutes, but enough to get through a chapter or 2 each way.

I then listened to Guns, Germs and Steel and was actually disappointed. For having won a Pulitzer Price for that book, I thought Why the West Rules, For Now was a lot better written. However, the first book was written in the mid-90s and I think the second one is a lot more current, so that could account for the difference.

Listening to Eisenhower: The White House Years by Jim Newton right now. It's a very thorough account, by my reckoning. Pretty good stuff to see where we were as a nation 60 years ago.

subzali
03-11-2014, 10:20 AM
Been a while since an update, listened to:
In the President's Secret Service (http://www.amazon.com/In-Presidents-Secret-Service-Protect/dp/030746136X/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1394554309&sr=8-1&keywords=secret+service) by Ronald Kessler - insightful, enjoyed it

The Secrets of the FBI (http://www.amazon.com/Secrets-FBI-Ronald-Kessler/dp/0307719707/ref=sr_1_6?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1394554393&sr=1-6&keywords=FBI) by Ronald Kessler - also insightful, also enjoyed it

How to Win Friends and Influence People (http://www.amazon.com/How-Win-Friends-Influence-People/dp/0671027034/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1394554443&sr=1-1&keywords=how+to+win+friends+and+influence+people) by Dale Carnegie - for years I've been intimidated to read this book, yet I don't know why. Everyone should read this book.

Dark Waters (The Expedition Trilogy, Book 1) (http://www.amazon.com/Dark-Waters-Expedition-Trilogy-Book/dp/0984915508/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1394554486&sr=1-1&keywords=the+expedition) by Jason Lewis - This book/trilogy/story has me completely hooked. First human-powered circumnavigation of the world. The British humor makes for a good read. Cannot wait to read The Seed Buried Deep (http://www.amazon.com/Seed-Buried-Deep-Expedition-Trilogy/dp/0984915516/ref=pd_bxgy_b_img_y) and cannot wait until the 3rd and final book is written to hear the rest of the story. Exploration and maps makes for a good read in my world.

Arctic Labyrinth: The Quest for the Northwest Passage (http://www.amazon.com/Arctic-Labyrinth-Quest-Northwest-Passage/dp/0520266277/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1394554549&sr=1-1&keywords=arctic+labyrinth) by Glyn Williams - Continuing in the exploration and maps theme, this book is lengthy but interesting history, with enough maps of new areas and plates of images to keep things engaging. About 60 pages in now.

rover67
03-11-2014, 12:35 PM
Shackleton was a bad mo-fo. I suggest reading it to understand how decisions affect outcomes in hard core scenarios. Very interesting.

I also highly recommend this one if you like that sort of stuff. Interesting to see how three teams had different outcomes after the accident plus it's the inspiration for Moby Dick.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/In_the_Heart_of_the_Sea:_The_Tragedy_of_the_Whaleship_Essex

bh4rnnr
03-15-2014, 10:06 AM
Shackleton was a bad mo-fo. I suggest reading it to understand how decisions affect outcomes in hard core scenarios. Very interesting.

I also highly recommend this one if you like that sort of stuff. Interesting to see how three teams had different outcomes after the accident plus it's the inspiration for Moby Dick.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/In_the_Heart_of_the_Sea:_The_Tragedy_of_the_Whaleship_Essex

Yeah,

Shackleton was an amazing dude. Great documentary on him. Cant remember the name.. Watched it at the Imax a few years back.

Currently reading:

Chronicles of Colorado. Interesting take on our history, seen though the people who witnessed it. ISB: 1-58979-045-6.

On the to read list is: Kearny's March, The epic Creation of the American West, 1846-1847. By Winston groom. ISBN: 978-0-307-27096-2.

Read a little about Kearny and his march, looking forward to the full tale.

subzali
03-30-2014, 09:41 PM
Reading The Mystery of Mallory and Irvine by Tom Holzel and Audrey Salkeld right now.

Also listening to The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People in the car.

BritKLR
03-31-2014, 07:19 AM
"Where men win glory" by Jon Krakauer. The Pat Tillman story.

PabloCruise
04-03-2014, 08:26 PM
Been a while since an update, listened to: In the President's Secret Service (http://www.amazon.com/In-Presidents-Secret-Service-Protect/dp/030746136X/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1394554309&sr=8-1&keywords=secret+service) by Ronald Kessler - insightful, enjoyed it The Secrets of the FBI (http://www.amazon.com/Secrets-FBI-Ronald-Kessler/dp/0307719707/ref=sr_1_6?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1394554393&sr=1-6&keywords=FBI) by Ronald Kessler - also insightful, also enjoyed it How to Win Friends and Influence People (http://www.amazon.com/How-Win-Friends-Influence-People/dp/0671027034/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1394554443&sr=1-1&keywords=how+to+win+friends+and+influence+people) by Dale Carnegie - for years I've been intimidated to read this book, yet I don't know why. Everyone should read this book. Dark Waters (The Expedition Trilogy, Book 1) (http://www.amazon.com/Dark-Waters-Expedition-Trilogy-Book/dp/0984915508/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1394554486&sr=1-1&keywords=the+expedition) by Jason Lewis - This book/trilogy/story has me completely hooked. First human-powered circumnavigation of the world. The British humor makes for a good read. Cannot wait to read The Seed Buried Deep (http://www.amazon.com/Seed-Buried-Deep-Expedition-Trilogy/dp/0984915516/ref=pd_bxgy_b_img_y) and cannot wait until the 3rd and final book is written to hear the rest of the story. Exploration and maps makes for a good read in my world. Arctic Labyrinth: The Quest for the Northwest Passage (http://www.amazon.com/Arctic-Labyrinth-Quest-Northwest-Passage/dp/0520266277/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1394554549&sr=1-1&keywords=arctic+labyrinth) by Glyn Williams - Continuing in the exploration and maps theme, this book is lengthy but interesting history, with enough maps of new areas and plates of images to keep things engaging. About 60 pages in now.

If you like reading about the Northwest Passage, read about Roald Amundsen. He was one bad-ass Norwegian. He also looked for the passage, attempted to reach the North Pole, and then heard someone beat him to it, so he pulled back. Now historians doubt the other party's claim that they reached the N Pole. Amundsen instead launched an effort to reach the S Pole first and succeeded. He beat a team of Brits who perished in their effort.
Also, read The Terror. Historical fiction about the NW Passage.

PabloCruise
04-03-2014, 08:30 PM
These books were all good picks. My commute is now 13 miles each way, 30-35 minutes, but enough to get through a chapter or 2 each way. I then listened to Guns, Germs and Steel and was actually disappointed. For having won a Pulitzer Price for that book, I thought Why the West Rules, For Now was a lot better written. However, the first book was written in the mid-90s and I think the second one is a lot more current, so that could account for the difference. Listening to Eisenhower: The White House Years by Jim Newton right now. It's a very thorough account, by my reckoning. Pretty good stuff to see where we were as a nation 60 years ago.

Matt, listen to The 50's, by Dave Halberstam. Very excellent history of our nation from post WW II to our U2 getting shot down. The guy is a good writer.

PabloCruise
04-03-2014, 08:35 PM
I'm not an avid reader, but I finished this one in 3 days on my recent vacation. INCREDIBLE story of a guy who ran track in the 1936 Olympics, then went to war (WWII in the Pacific). Got shot down in his bomber over the Pacific, survived for 40-something days on a life raft, and then got captured and spent 2+ years in a Japanese POW camp. If ever you feel like your entitled life is difficult, just read what this guy went through and you'll feel pretty good about what you have. http://www.amazon.com/Unbroken-World-Survival-Resilience-Redemption/dp/0739319698

This was excellent! Pretty spooky what happened to him after he was freed.

PabloCruise
04-03-2014, 08:38 PM
I needed something light-hearted and uplifting, so I just read 'The Road' and 'No Country For Old Men' by Cormac McCarthy. Good stuff. The movies were good, but the books were superior.

I read No Country. Cormac McCarthy is very good, but he freaks me out. I have the heard The Road is pretty spooky. Try The Crossing and All the Pretty Horses, Blood Meridian.

PabloCruise
04-03-2014, 08:43 PM
I enjoyed that book, and think it was fairly well documented. I have come to understand that a lot of people do not like Jon Krakauer, but I thought it was a fairly unbiased read. But what do I know...

Krakauer does his research! A Perfect Storm describes all the different ways you can die from drowning. Good stuff to think about during long, open water swims...