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DaveInDenver
04-15-2010, 07:18 AM
Looking under my truck recently I think I'm going to have to remove the sliders this summer. My rocker panels and pinch welds are creased and bent up and the paint is flaking off to bare metal when the sliders have impacted. Another winter will not be kind to the paint I'm afraid.

So what is the best method for removing welded-to-the-frame sliders? Bill made scab plates that he welded to my frame, to which is attached the slider legs with corner bracing. My thinking is that it's best to leave the scab plates welded to the frame, cut the legs and grind the welds flush to the scab plates. That way if sliders ever get put back on they would be welded to those plates and not subject the frame to another weld.

RockRunner
04-15-2010, 08:04 AM
You can stop by my house this weekend and use the plasma cutter and then grind clean. Or if it can not reach an area we have the sawzall too. LMK I will be working all weekend loooonnngggg.

Air Randy
04-15-2010, 08:23 AM
What are you building that is going to take all weekend?

nakman
04-15-2010, 05:18 PM
Dave could you cut the arms so you leave a little stub coming off the scab plates? Then when you reattach, could you use a larger piece of square tubing as a coupler? And for that matter, heck put bolts through both ends of the coupler and stubs so you'd have bolt-on sliders?

DaveInDenver
04-15-2010, 05:51 PM
Dave could you cut the arms so you leave a little stub coming off the scab plates? Then when you reattach, could you use a larger piece of square tubing as a coupler? And for that matter, heck put bolts through both ends of the coupler and stubs so you'd have bolt-on sliders?
As soon as I read the word 'stub' the light bulb went off. Then I found myself saying 'duh' when I read that last sentence. Duh. That's EXACTLY why I posted what might seem like an obvious question, for that 'ah ha' moment. If I do it carefully I might even be able to salvage these, eh.

nakman
04-16-2010, 08:26 AM
As soon as I read the word 'stub' the light bulb went off. Then I found myself saying 'duh' when I read that last sentence. Duh. That's EXACTLY why I posted what might seem like an obvious question, for that 'ah ha' moment. If I do it carefully I might even be able to salvage these, eh.


Right on. Something like this, right?

bustanutley
04-16-2010, 08:53 AM
I always do the opposite nak, sleeve on the inside to keep it incognito.

nakman
04-16-2010, 08:57 AM
I always do the opposite nak, sleeve on the inside to keep it incognito.

Yeah probably depends on the availability of tubing too, right? Do you re-weld yours, or through bolt it?

bustanutley
04-16-2010, 09:26 AM
when I need to sleeve things I drill a couple holes in the outer tubing and plug weld.

Rezarf
04-16-2010, 10:00 AM
I was thinking the same thing. Cut the outrigger half way and then sleeve it inside or outside, and you could bolt, weld or whatever. I think your biggest issue at that point will be a tight fitting sleeve setup.

Sorry to hear about the damage Dave. Is there anyway to avoid it in the future when you bolt them back on?

DaveInDenver
04-16-2010, 10:17 AM
I was thinking the same thing. Cut the outrigger half way and then sleeve it inside or outside, and you could bolt, weld or whatever. I think your biggest issue at that point will be a tight fitting sleeve setup.

Sorry to hear about the damage Dave. Is there anyway to avoid it in the future when you bolt them back on?
I think the best thing is stop doing slider drops on the Rubicon. Falling 2 or 3 feet square onto the sliders is bound to make them deflect and sure enough they did so, a couple of inches apparently. My thinking is that sleeved removable sliders and an inch or so of body lift will be just the ticket. The fact is they are used far more as steps to reach the roof and WilderNest than as crawling sliders and so mostly it's washboard rattling that worries me about bolted connections.

Air Randy
04-16-2010, 10:38 AM
I would do an exterior sleeve (versus interior) and make it the full length of the tube versus a 3-4 inch piece as shown on the drawing. You will effectively double the strength of the entire support. If you do bolts near the cut seam and on each end, with nylock nuts, you will never, ever need to worry about rattling or bending the arms.