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AxleIke
06-28-2010, 10:23 PM
So, in my ongoing effort that will no doubt be described by some as polishing a turd, I am building some new stuff for my steering.

First up was an idler arm from total chaos. Very nice unit, will have to notch the frame for it to clear. Haven't gotten there yet.

This weekend I bent a tie rod, which was annoying and lit a fire to get me going on a project I've had laying around for some time.

Essentially, the challenge is, the tie rods on IFS cannot be straight, or the steering binds. Thus, as you will see in the stock units, there is a bend.

So, here is what I've concocted.

First up, I took two pieces of 1/4" wall DOM, 1.5" OD and welded them as so. I then took a 3/4" x 16 grade 8 bolt, and cut off the head and shoulder some. I then took a piece of 1/8" Wall 1" od tube, and cut it to size. I drilled holes in the sides, and then put the bolt in, welded top and bottom, and two rosettes on the sides. I then smoothed it out with a grinder, and, after drilling two holes in the 1.5" tube, I slid the bolt and 1" tube inside, and again, welded top, bottom, and rosettes on the sides. This was the result:

http://i29.photobucket.com/albums/c263/AxleIke/IMG_4359.jpg

http://i29.photobucket.com/albums/c263/AxleIke/IMG_4360.jpg

I then reasoned that this would not be strong enough. I then put a front plate of 3/16" on the front, and welded to both tubes, then two plates top and bottom, again welded on all sides to both tubes, and then an end cap, just to keep out water. I then welded a 23mm RH thread insert into the other end and ground it to clean it up.

Lastly, I made an adjuster sleeve with a 3/4" x 16 RH thread insert on one end, and a 23mm LH thread insert on the other.

As you can see from the assembled pics, I'm using FJ-80 rod ends in both sides that attach to the existing steering.

NOTE: Nothing is threaded on all the way. Obviously, not nearly that much thread will be sticking out.

http://i29.photobucket.com/albums/c263/AxleIke/IMG_4362.jpg

http://i29.photobucket.com/albums/c263/AxleIke/IMG_4364.jpg

Thoughts? Areas that look bad? Not a ton I can do about it now, but we'll see.

Uncle Ben
06-29-2010, 07:26 AM
The obvious weak link to my eyes will be the 3/4" threaded bolt. It all looks beefy but that looks to be the same size as what bent before.

Red_Chili
06-29-2010, 08:00 AM
The first pic scared me but even before I scrolled the screen on my Droid I thought 'Give Isaac 30 seconds & it will be hell for stout '. Sho'nuff. :lmao:

powderpig
06-29-2010, 08:32 AM
When will frankstein come alive?:thumb:
I agree with UB, that center section is still a week link, but if it always moves that in a straight line, then all should be OK. Will it fit where it is designed to fit? and move the wheel back and forth with out binding?

AxleIke
06-29-2010, 09:04 AM
Well, I dunno.

The pic above does not quite show things as they will be. It is designed to have very little thread showing when it is the proper length. As it is shown in the picture, both my new one, and the stock one are WAY too long. I just stuck them together to show it, and didn't feel like running the threads all the way in.

Robbie, It sort of moves in a straight line. It is always being pushed or pulled on along the axis, however, because of the bend, I imagine there will be some side load, though I don't know how much. It will also move up and down as the suspension cycles.

Anyway, I haven't gotten it on the truck to check clearance yet because it was way, way too hot last night to handle without channel locks and vise grips. We'll see.

I am concerned about the 3/4" bolt now. I dunno if it makes a difference that most of the threaded bolt will be inside the adjuster or not?

RockRunner
06-29-2010, 09:21 AM
Interesting, sooner or later there will be no stock parts on your rig ;)

Uncle Ben
06-29-2010, 09:28 AM
I am concerned about the 3/4" bolt now. I dunno if it makes a difference that most of the threaded bolt will be inside the adjuster or not?

Sorry to be a critic Isaac! It just seems that that smaller (not small) 3/4" threaded section is in the exact same place that the original rods bent and close to the same size.

http://i29.photobucket.com/albums/c263/AxleIke/IMG_4358.jpg

wesintl
06-29-2010, 09:46 AM
why did you build it with the bolt in the middle? I'd remove that and you still have adjustability with the length of the rod.

AxleIke
06-29-2010, 10:04 AM
Sorry to be a critic Isaac! It just seems that that smaller (not small) 3/4" threaded section is in the exact same place that the original rods bent and close to the same size.



You have nothing to be sorry about. I want feedback good and bad.

I am concerned about it. One thing is that the original bent at the bend in the tie rod, and carried through to the threaded area, at least thats what it looks like to me. I'll snap a pic tonight.

However, I may start over and use something like 7/8 hardware. We'll see.

AxleIke
06-29-2010, 10:05 AM
why did you build it with the bolt in the middle? I'd remove that and you still have adjustability with the length of the rod.

Sorry wes, I'm not following you there. What do you mean by "in the middle" and I don't understand which part you'd remove?

wesintl
06-29-2010, 10:10 AM
both tre have threads on each end (unless I missed where you used 2 rh (or lh)) tre. build it with the middle bolt (threads) removed. You can still adjust the rod without it, no?

AxleIke
06-29-2010, 10:32 AM
both tre have threads on each end (unless I missed where you used 2 rh (or lh)) tre. build it with the middle bolt (threads) removed. You can still adjust the rod without it, no?

Ah.

I see what you meant. The reason that I have the middle bolt is because the whole unit has to clear the center link. The part on the left with the jog in it has to remain stationary, so the tre is only there to attach it to the center link. It cannot be rotated because of clearance issues. There will be a jam nut holding it stationary. The center bolt and adjuster sleeve will be used to adjust toe.

sleeoffroad
06-29-2010, 05:03 PM
Isaac, do you have ball joint spacers on that truck?

AxleIke
06-29-2010, 05:11 PM
Isaac, do you have ball joint spacers on that truck?

yes, but its currently sitting at stock height. I relaxed the torsion bars to allow the suspension to travel a little easier and give a bit better ride.

J Kimmel
06-29-2010, 06:29 PM
seems ok, I'd make a couple of spares though.

AxleIke
06-29-2010, 07:15 PM
I've been looking at it, thinking, looking at it, thinking.

I'm going to do something different. This just isn't cutting it for me. I want to get rid of the weak link, not wonder if I did.

Really what I think I need to do Jeremy is get a couple of 60's :D

J Kimmel
06-29-2010, 08:18 PM
we can swap an axle under there in a weekend...just sayin...

AxleIke
06-29-2010, 09:42 PM
we can swap an axle under there in a weekend...just sayin...

Its not a matter of time. Its a matter of money. I don't want the "same old" so my plans for a swap entail waiting until after a certain :Princess: gets done planning a wedding :banghead:

J Kimmel
06-29-2010, 09:51 PM
makes sense, I'm all for waiting and doing it once...there are very few ways I would do it for myself anymore :)

AxleIke
06-29-2010, 10:01 PM
Word.

I do a lot of web-fabbing by reading a lot of other builds. I like to think of new ways to do stuff, although, as my current rig shows example of, that isn't always the best way. In fact, I've learned a lot about what doesn't work well by putting it on my rig. LOL

I figure by the time I'm ready to swap, I'll be able to hit the nail on the head.

J Kimmel
06-30-2010, 06:37 AM
another thing to consider, is think about what you want to end up with, and don't get too caught up in the details...I've seen plenty of builds stall out because the guy can't decide what to do, or it has to be perfect, or something.

I don't think you'll have too much trouble with that :)

AddictedOffroad
06-30-2010, 06:59 AM
Issac, I have several IFS steering setups laying around if you want them. No guarantee on condition, but they all came off bone stock 4runners or pickups so they should be in good shape. It might be a good idea to carry some spares as that setup looks scary to say the least.

AxleIke
06-30-2010, 09:15 AM
Issac, I have several IFS steering setups laying around if you want them. No guarantee on condition, but they all came off bone stock 4runners or pickups so they should be in good shape. It might be a good idea to carry some spares as that setup looks scary to say the least.

Thanks man, but I do have a few spares lying around.

Agreed on scary. I'm going to do something different, and am scrapping this version.

I am going to move the steering box forward, which I have to do when it gets sas'd anyway, and the idler arm too. This will allow the tie rods to be one straight piece of .25 wall DOM.

AxleIke
07-03-2010, 11:54 PM
Alrighty.

Got some good work in today. Got the steering disassembled, and the steering box removed (a huge mess).

Then started measuring, marking and cutting the areas of the front clip that needed to be cut out, and made quick work of it with the plasma:

http://i29.photobucket.com/albums/c263/AxleIke/IMG_4365.jpg

Then, got the box into position, and marked out where the holes were to go in the new location. Using a long bit for a pilot and then a nice HF step bit (great bang for your buck BTW) the holes were drilled out and the old bungs were ground off so that both sides of the frame had smooth, clean surfaces:

http://i29.photobucket.com/albums/c263/AxleIke/IMG_4366.jpg

Then, back to scissors and card board, which was then transfered to plate and plasma'd out:

http://i29.photobucket.com/albums/c263/AxleIke/IMG_4367.jpg

There are two plates, one in the outside, and one on the inside. The outer plate is 1/4" and the inner is 3/16".

The plates were then installed with tubes running through the frame, and everything was welded into place:

http://i29.photobucket.com/albums/c263/AxleIke/IMG_4369.jpg

Then, the tubes were cut off and the face was ground smooth so the box can mount up flush:

http://i29.photobucket.com/albums/c263/AxleIke/IMG_4374.jpg

Finally, the box was stuck on, the relay rod, and a yet un-assembled tie rod to check for fitment:

http://i29.photobucket.com/albums/c263/AxleIke/IMG_4376.jpg

I like this much better already. I think my original idea was just plain flawed, and while this is a lot more work, I think it will be stronger in the end.

The other thing that will have to happen is that the relay rod will be cut, and sleeved with .250 wall DOM, to make it stronger and lengthen it the appropriate length for the fact that the box, and soon, the idler, will be spaced out 7/16".

From everything I can tell, it is a forged piece, but none the less, I will be heating it to 500F in my barbeque, welding, and then post heating in the barbeque as well, just to be sure that it stays straight and doesn't get brittle.

Tomorrow I will work on mounting the idler arm

Red_Chili
07-04-2010, 12:22 AM
Just a thought... could you ditch the idler arm completely and go from the pitman all the way over? If you could drop the pitman a bit, I bet the bump steer would be no worse than stock (which isn't horrible IIRC). The asymmetry might not be so bad... dunno.

Another thought... keep the idler, make a relay rod and make the outer tie rods longer; meet closer to the middle. You would have to re-engineer the skid plate. That would, I think, reduce the stress on the idler, distribute it between the pitman and the idler more equally, and move it to the relay rod (which could be made plenty stout).

A third thought... combine the two ideas. Bring the driver's outer tie rod to the middle of the vehicle more or less, while continuing the drag link to the steering arm. Hey, just because that's what Heep does, doesn't mean it's horrible... :lmao:

Red_Chili
07-04-2010, 12:28 AM
Its not a matter of time. Its a matter of money. I don't want the "same old" so my plans for a swap entail waiting until after a certain :Princess: gets done planning a wedding :banghead:

As I keep telling her, Diamonds aren't just for girls any more. And, for the price of hers, I could have two very well outfitted ones with money to spare. :mad:

On a side note, why don't we have a vomit emoticon. Perfectly describes how I feel about wedding planning and the whole concept of weddings these days in general.
Uh... would that be YOUR wedding? Or someone else's? If the former... :eek: :eek:

AxleIke
07-04-2010, 09:56 AM
Just a thought... could you ditch the idler arm completely and go from the pitman all the way over? If you could drop the pitman a bit, I bet the bump steer would be no worse than stock (which isn't horrible IIRC). The asymmetry might not be so bad... dunno.

Another thought... keep the idler, make a relay rod and make the outer tie rods longer; meet closer to the middle. You would have to re-engineer the skid plate. That would, I think, reduce the stress on the idler, distribute it between the pitman and the idler more equally, and move it to the relay rod (which could be made plenty stout).

A third thought... combine the two ideas. Bring the driver's outer tie rod to the middle of the vehicle more or less, while continuing the drag link to the steering arm. Hey, just because that's what Heep does, doesn't mean it's horrible... :lmao:

Not really, as I read that someone tried that (who knows if its true, but it does make sense to me) and ended up with horrendous bump steer.

I'm really not worried about the idler any more. I have a total chaos arm.

AxleIke
07-04-2010, 09:59 AM
Deleted for off topic.

AxleIke
07-04-2010, 02:32 PM
Deleted for off topic

AxleIke
07-05-2010, 10:20 PM
Got rid of all the off topic stuff. Sorry for the rants, just not in a good mood.

Anyway, today I got the idler side all done up. Got the braces cut off the TC arm, and new ones welded on, so that the braces still bolt to the underside of the frame.

Also, pretty much determined the center link is forged= thank goodness.

Did two tests: Spark test which was simply just grinding on it. Sparks that are bright and scatter quite a bit are indicative of forged steel ( or so says the interwebs). Cast will have very few sparks and they will not scatter (supposedly)

The other is the ring test, so I suspended the relay rod (center link) by a zip tie, and tapped it with a hammer: Rang like a bell.

Also a good sign. Cast steel does not ring.

Also, cast parts generally have very thin marks, or seams, on them from the molds, where as forged parts will have very thick marks, or seams, where the forging hammers came together.

So, I ground down the link, cut it in half, and clearanced it (maybe a 1/32 of material was removed) to fit inside a 1.5 .250 wall DOM tube.

Now, I have to get my barbeque down stairs so I can heat this thing to weld it. Pre and post heat are not critical for forged material, but with a Miller 175 and a 1" thick relay rod, I'm guessing heating it isn't going to hurt anything.

Camera is acting up. I need the cord, which I left at work. Will hopefully have pics up tomorrow.

AxleIke
07-06-2010, 09:40 PM
Got some gussets made this evening, and started mocking up the center link. Also primed the frame yesterday, and painted today

Here is the mocked up idler, and a shot showing how I cut off the bracing:

http://i29.photobucket.com/albums/c263/AxleIke/IMG_4377.jpg

http://i29.photobucket.com/albums/c263/AxleIke/IMG_4378.jpg

And, I added some new bracing in:

http://i29.photobucket.com/albums/c263/AxleIke/IMG_4380.jpg

Primed the frame yesterday:

http://i29.photobucket.com/albums/c263/AxleIke/IMG_4379.jpg

Next it was on to mock up:

First I lined up a stock arm for reference:

http://i29.photobucket.com/albums/c263/AxleIke/IMG_4381.jpg

http://i29.photobucket.com/albums/c263/AxleIke/IMG_4383.jpg

Then it was on to the new arm:

Parts I'm using:

http://i29.photobucket.com/albums/c263/AxleIke/IMG_4384.jpg

http://i29.photobucket.com/albums/c263/AxleIke/IMG_4385.jpg

Mocked up, extended 1/2" to account for the extra steel on the frame now:

http://i29.photobucket.com/albums/c263/AxleIke/IMG_4386.jpg

http://i29.photobucket.com/albums/c263/AxleIke/IMG_4387.jpg

I spent the rest of the evening making gussets. I still have a few more to go:

http://i29.photobucket.com/albums/c263/AxleIke/IMG_4388.jpg

http://i29.photobucket.com/albums/c263/AxleIke/IMG_4389.jpg

I'll be using a piece of tube as shown to tie gussets into on the front side of the arm. Still have to make those though.

http://i29.photobucket.com/albums/c263/AxleIke/IMG_4390.jpg

Also still have to drill holes in the main tube so I can rossette weld along the length of the tube.

thefatkid
07-06-2010, 09:44 PM
Were you having issues welding to the Cromo? It looks like it was spattering on you?

I've never had the pleasure of welding cromo

Jacket
07-07-2010, 08:53 AM
The mighty plasma cutter....very nice. Enjoying your creativity.:ranger:

AxleIke
07-07-2010, 09:15 AM
Were you having issues welding to the Cromo? It looks like it was spattering on you?

I've never had the pleasure of welding cromo

I don't think that part is cromoly.

However, is there some way to make it NOT spatter? EVERY one of my welds has TONS of spatter, and I hate it! I just assumed other people used some sort of spatter spray, but if there is something I'm doing wrong, let me know.

AxleIke
07-07-2010, 09:15 AM
The mighty plasma cutter....very nice. Enjoying your creativity.:ranger:

Thanks matt!

Uncle Ben
07-07-2010, 09:17 AM
Were you having issues welding to the Cromo? It looks like it was spattering on you?

I've never had the pleasure of welding cromo

Cromo is actually very nice to weld with! Since it essentially pure steel it beads and flows smoothly and consistently!

Isaac, when sleeving you always want to cut the sleeve at an angle so you don't create a shear plane when you weld it together.

AxleIke
07-07-2010, 09:34 AM
Cromo is actually very nice to weld with! Since it essentially pure steel it beads and flows smoothly and consistently!

Isaac, when sleeving you always want to cut the sleeve at an angle so you don't create a shear plane when you weld it together.

AH! Great to know! Thank you! is the best way just to put two V notches on opposite sides?

Also, any thoughts on the spatter, fab-man?

rover67
07-07-2010, 10:07 AM
You running straightCO2 or 75/25?

AxleIke
07-07-2010, 10:28 AM
75/25

thefatkid
07-07-2010, 10:31 AM
What welder? I just switched to a MM250x and that helped a ton. They also make spatter spray/coating.

The newer millers are even smoother from what I've experienced.

AxleIke
07-07-2010, 10:47 AM
MM175. I've seen the spatter spray coatings, but I dunno. The welder is maybe 3 years old.

However, it doesn't matter if I'm welding 1/4, 3/16, or 1/8 (all of which that welder is rated for) it still spatters like crazy.

RockRunner
07-07-2010, 11:22 AM
I use the anti spatter spray and dip the tip of the gun into a blue goop that keeps the spatter from sticking to the welder itself. I also found that I needed more gas, 75/25, to get better welds. I still suck but there is far less spatter.

You can buy the spray at Murdoch's' or welding supply places.

rover67
07-07-2010, 11:31 AM
Weird.. so 75/25 is good...

I've never really had a problem with spatter and I don't use any spray other than a little bit on the gun to keep it clean.

thefatkid
07-07-2010, 12:10 PM
What wire? I found that makes a big difference. I'll have to check what I burned with last time.

AxleIke
07-07-2010, 01:22 PM
.030 Lincoln solid wire.

Uncle Ben
07-07-2010, 02:19 PM
Spatter comes from impurities. If your shielding gas pressure is too low or the metal is dirty you will get lots of spatter. It's caused from trapped volatile gases "boiling" the puddle. Spatter wire (flux core) is a good example as the flux is melted into the puddle so it spatters as the gas escapes.

______
You "bologna" cut the sleeve. /______---->

AxleIke
07-07-2010, 03:15 PM
Spatter comes from impurities. If your shielding gas pressure is too low or the metal is dirty you will get lots of spatter. It's caused from trapped volatile gases "boiling" the puddle. Spatter wire (flux core) is a good example as the flux is melted into the puddle so it spatters as the gas escapes.

______
You "bologna" cut the sleeve. /______---->

I dunno then. I get spatter when I have nice clean beveled edges, or just tacking something to hold something else that has mill scale. Maybe its the mig gun tip getting some clogging.

I'm trying to understand bologna cut? What is the arrow off on the right, and are you trying to indicate just a diagonal cut?

Uncle Ben
07-07-2010, 04:06 PM
I dunno then. I get spatter when I have nice clean beveled edges, or just tacking something to hold something else that has mill scale. Maybe its the mig gun tip getting some clogging.

I'm trying to understand bologna cut? What is the arrow off on the right, and are you trying to indicate just a diagonal cut?

Yessir. The arrow just means the sleeve continues that way. hmmmm I'll snoop Google.....

AxleIke
07-12-2010, 09:11 AM
Got some more done. I now only have one tie rod left to make and I should be good to go!

Anyway, some progress:

First off, I "bologna cut" the center link sleeve and drilled it full of holes for rossette welds:

http://i29.photobucket.com/albums/c263/AxleIke/IMG_4391.jpg

http://i29.photobucket.com/albums/c263/AxleIke/IMG_4393.jpg

Then, after checking everything lined up, it was BARBEQUE TIME!!!!

http://i29.photobucket.com/albums/c263/AxleIke/IMG_4394.jpg

The thermometer on the top of the grill read about 600F, but I'd imagine its only accurate to 50 deg at best. However, it was hot. I let the parts heat in there for 45 minutes, then pulled them out part by part and welded them up, with one 10 minute re-heat of the main piece in the middle of it.

Welded great, so I'm pretty sure my "tests" of the metal were accurate enough, by which I mean, it was a forged piece.

After welding, I put the whole thing back under the grill for another 30 minutes, and then shut the grill off, and kept the lid closed and let it cool. I think it was pretty slow cooling.

Anyway, I did not have a chance to shoot pictures while welding things up, as it was too rushed.

However, this is the finished product, checking for fitment on the truck:

http://i29.photobucket.com/albums/c263/AxleIke/IMG_4397.jpg

http://i29.photobucket.com/albums/c263/AxleIke/IMG_4399.jpg

I think some of those braces are a bit large, so I may trim them down a bit.

Here are a couple shots after doing a little clean up grinding, next to a stock unit:

http://i29.photobucket.com/albums/c263/AxleIke/IMG_4400.jpg

http://i29.photobucket.com/albums/c263/AxleIke/IMG_4401.jpg

http://i29.photobucket.com/albums/c263/AxleIke/IMG_4403.jpg

I'm hoping this will result in a steering system that won't bend. I seem to have this knack, however, of not getting things to do what I want them to do.

Anyway, I also got one tie rod welded up, but don't have a picture yet. Not too impressive though, just a straight piece of DOM with two threaded inserts welded it, also with rossette welds.

FJBRADY
07-12-2010, 10:05 AM
Curious, what's the reason for "cooking/heating" the metal?

DaveInDenver
07-12-2010, 10:14 AM
Curious, what's the reason for "cooking/heating" the metal?
Less chance of ruining the heat treatment or creating new internal stresses or warping.

FJBRADY
07-12-2010, 10:17 AM
Less chance of ruining the heat treatment.

Makes sense. Thx, Dave!

DaveInDenver
07-12-2010, 10:24 AM
Makes sense. Thx, Dave!
Preheating and/or postheating are usually required when dealing with certified welds, like pipelines and pressure vessels. Also helps make sure the material is absolutely free of moisture or condensation. That has a couple of problems, one is obviously from the popping, but water introduces hydrogen into the weld which creates metallurgical issues, too. FWIW, it's stuff like this why I am strictly against using bumpers and sliders as air tanks. Even if the welds seems nice and the design is free of pressure risers (like say all corners are round), all it takes is one small mistake to create a potentially dangerous fragmentation grenade.

AxleIke
07-12-2010, 10:37 AM
Thanks Dave! Obviously I was just going off of recommendations.

Steve, the other reason for heating before the weld is because of the material thickness.

Don't quote me, but I have read that you can weld thicker material with a smaller welder the hotter the material is.

My MM175 is a great little box, but it starts to struggle at 3/8". Because I was welding 1/4 to a 1" rod, I wanted it as hot as possible to start, so that I would get adequate penetration on the welds.

The other reason was that this is a forged piece.

As far as I know, forged pieces of steel are cast steel that is then re heated to red hot, then smashed over and over again with a huge hammer. These days' the hammers are huge machines with forging plates that are in the shape of the part.

Forging re-aligns the metal crystals inside the part and generally makes the part more resistant to cracking and fracturing.

Again, don't quote me on that.

However, in the event that there were any imperfections in this part, heating the piece before hand helps to ensure that the welds will not induce areas of stress and cause the piece to crack next to the weld.

A common thing in the off road world is to link dana 60 axles under trucks. However, the 60's often have cast housings, which means that if you weld to them cold, your link tabs will just crack off. However, heating the housing with a rosebud before welding, then running the weld, and then re heating will eliminate this issue.

I figured, preheating and post heating, even this little bit, couldn't hurt, so I gave it a shot.

rover67
07-12-2010, 11:03 AM
You can also "peen" cast parts as they are cooling to prevent cracking. I have done this before and it works well.

DaveInDenver
07-12-2010, 11:21 AM
A common thing in the off road world is to link dana 60 axles under trucks. However, the 60's often have cast housings, which means that if you weld to them cold, your link tabs will just crack off. However, heating the housing with a rosebud before welding, then running the weld, and then re heating will eliminate this issue.
If you are in the presence of good blacksmiths and metalworkers it's really pretty amazing to watch how using a rosebud, hammer and anvil demonstrates in 5 minutes what all the textbooks and classes in the world try to explain about internal stress creating and reliving.
I figured, preheating and post heating, even this little bit, couldn't hurt, so I gave it a shot.
That's a good point, AFAIK it never can hurt to do.

AxleIke
08-01-2010, 10:01 PM
So, bummer thing about having a house now is that sometimes I get wrapped up in house projects and the truck sits for a while. But, this weekend, I got some time, and Baby Beast is driving again! Though, in desperate need of an alignment.

Couple pics:

Painting:

I trimmed down some of the gussets because there was going to be clearance issues. Also, a little lighter this way LOL :D

http://i29.photobucket.com/albums/c263/AxleIke/IMG_4444.jpg

http://i29.photobucket.com/albums/c263/AxleIke/IMG_4445.jpg

I then spent some time taking off the nuts on both the idler and steering box, and put on loctite, and torqued them to 70 ft lbs. Hopefully that is good. But I'll be checking them from time to time.

Then, it was assembly time.

HUGE thanks to Ben and Christo at Slee for running taps down my threaded inserts. They are a good product (the inserts), but I do not think the sets for the 80 rod ends are very practical. They warp too easily.

Anyway, all assembled:

http://i29.photobucket.com/albums/c263/AxleIke/IMG_4446.jpg

http://i29.photobucket.com/albums/c263/AxleIke/IMG_4450.jpg

http://i29.photobucket.com/albums/c263/AxleIke/IMG_4448.jpg

http://i29.photobucket.com/albums/c263/AxleIke/IMG_4447.jpg


Much beefier. These shouldn't bend (I hope)

http://i29.photobucket.com/albums/c263/AxleIke/IMG_4449.jpg

And, the truck. I gave the T-bar's a couple of turns to level things out just a bit. WAY out of alignment now.

http://i29.photobucket.com/albums/c263/AxleIke/IMG_4451.jpg

http://i29.photobucket.com/albums/c263/AxleIke/IMG_4452.jpg

Cheese
08-01-2010, 10:11 PM
And that my friend is why you're the man!

Looking good, I am impressed.

Uncle Ben
08-02-2010, 12:19 AM
Baby Beast is getting beastly! Nice work dude!

RockRunner
08-02-2010, 08:09 AM
Looks great, nice job on the design. I do have a question for you, what is the weakest part in your steering set your now? The reason I ask is simple, I have build up my drive train preity stout but I use so so U joints so in case I romp a little to hard the U joint will break :( but save the rest of your drive train. :)

PS I really lke the BBQ idea, at first I thought I was looking at knives being made.:hill:

AxleIke
08-02-2010, 08:39 AM
And that my friend is why you're the man!

Looking good, I am impressed.

LOL! Thanks dude! Haven't heard from you in a while. Whats up?

AxleIke
08-02-2010, 08:40 AM
Baby Beast is getting beastly! Nice work dude!

I'm hoping! Thanks man.

AxleIke
08-02-2010, 08:41 AM
Looks great, nice job on the design. I do have a question for you, what is the weakest part in your steering set your now? The reason I ask is simple, I have build up my drive train preity stout but I use so so U joints so in case I romp a little to hard the U joint will break :( but save the rest of your drive train. :)

PS I really lke the BBQ idea, at first I thought I was looking at knives being made.:hill:

Good point. Hard to say exactly. Probably still the idler arm, but possibly the knuckle arms. I have spares, and while the are a PAIN to change (bolts are big and REALLY tight), it could be done. Likely I will beef those up here in the future as well.

Cheese
08-03-2010, 11:02 AM
I bet the joints themselves take a dump or whatever sort of bushing is in the idler. Good plan to carry spare everything though.

I have been good, lumberjack racing all over this summer, I now have a 100 hp chainsaw that used to be a snowmobile engine!

Keep up the good work.

AxleIke
08-03-2010, 11:49 AM
The idler is pretty beefy, but yeah, its possible.

Essentially a steel sleeve that is greased, with two smaller steel sleeves in side that, which have a gap in the middle for grease. The outer sleeve keeps the bolt from crushing the ends together too much when tightened. The inners allow the bolt to stay greased.

at the end that the center link attaches to, there are two sealed roller bearings. Easy to replace if they fail, just a snap ring. Its a nice unit.