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Hudo4
08-09-2010, 04:41 PM
I was wondering if anyone has a list of recover gear I should have? I'm still new to the sport and I'm looking to make sure I have everything I need because heaven knows I'm sure to break something one of these days. :D

Thanks for any and all help.

FJBRADY
08-09-2010, 05:01 PM
Recovery gear or spare parts?

Recovery gear list of random order.
Strap(s)
D rings
gloves
set of metric tools including torque wrench.
vice grips
zip ties
winch
hi lift jack
CB or even better Ham
Cell Phone


Spare parts:

Spare CV (IFS) or short/long side axles
Fluids (90 wt, oil, coolant, brake fluid, ps fluid)
fuel filter
u joint
Most importantly stay on top of preventive maintence and every so often or before a trail run roll under the truck and make sure bolts are tight. Watch for leaks!

Depends also how hard your are going to wheel it as far the spare parts go. Good rule of thumb don't go alone.

That's all I can think of....I am sure I missed something.

rover67
08-09-2010, 05:05 PM
Here's a good start for recovery stuff. He's in Firestone too, so just up the street. It's all rated gear.

http://rockstomper.netfirms.com/shoppingcart/nfoscomm/catalog/product_info.php?cPath=1_16&products_id=70

Tools and spares require a bit more thought.. Steve has a good start. The tool and spare kit will morph as you use it and need stuff.

FJBRADY
08-09-2010, 05:10 PM
Here's a good start. He's in Firestone too, so just up the street. It's all rated gear.

http://rockstomper.netfirms.com/shoppingcart/nfoscomm/catalog/product_info.php?cPath=1_16&products_id=70

Yup good stuff. I you are wondering why a chain? If someone does not have a tow point use a chain in the frame rather than a strap so you don't ruin the strap by getting caught on sharp under body areas.

Caribou Sandstorm
08-09-2010, 05:21 PM
Hi Brent,

I just gave a recovery gear 101 presentation, so I can take a stab a this for you, also. You can buy a kit pre-made but they seem kind of expensive and I had to build mine over time.. Anything over 100.00 and I have to get a Purchase Order approval, so I like to fly under the radar...

Basic kit
- 2 pair of gloves, one for under your drivers seat and one for your recovery bag $10.00
- Standard recovery strap, get the one with the highest rating, I have an ARB it was $66.00 at an event I was just at.
-tree saver strap, pretty standard across the board, usually $30-50.00
-2 or 3 D-shackles or D-rings look for 4T or higher on the WLL (weight load limit) rating, it is stampped on the shackle
-"High Lift" jack 48" is probably plenty 60" seems really big $50.00
-Shovel, resin handle vs. wood (just learned that one) $no more then $20.00
- Bill Burke's "Getting Unstuck" video $29.00
-bag or pack to carry all this in... I just got an ARB bag for $40.00, they also have some new water proof ones that are super cool...

Maybe more advanced Kit additions
-Snatch block $100.00
-Chain 15 feet of 70 gage ( i think that is the correct gage)
-Winch Warn 8000 will do..$600.00 nicer is a Superwinch probably like $1200.00
-Kinetic rope $120.00
-High lift adapter to fit your sliders, just got one super cool $45.00
-hitch receiver for recovery options if you have a hitch

I am sure I am leaving out some other stuff

Forgot my tool box of shinny new tools..

leiniesred
08-09-2010, 05:22 PM
Minimum? tow points, strap, friend to wheel with.


What I carry?

first aid kit
Water
Couple-a granola bars
Hat, gloves, jacket, lighter
fire extinguisher

recovery points for and aft
Spare tire
shovel
Hi-lift jack
30' recovery strap
6' tree saver strap.
at least 3 clevises for rigging. RATED hardware only please.
Winch 8000# or bigger
snatch block for winch

Basic tools like open end wrenches, socket set, pliers, screwdriver, multimeter.
tire plug kit
hose clamps
zip ties
duct tape
electric tape
JB weld
tarp
ratchet strap
engine oil
brake fluid
tub of grease
birfield
spare hubs

some small spare parts like fuses and an ignition coil and igniter a plug wire, spare belts

Map
Compass
GPS
Mobile phone
Ham radio
CB radio
Club roster

The more you have the less uncomfortable a breakdown/stuck is.

FJBRADY
08-09-2010, 05:24 PM
Tools and spares require a bit more thought.. Steve has a good start. The tool and spare kit will morph as you use it and need stuff.

Good point. I did not have squat in the early days, which was not too long ago, but when you see someone needing fluids or something as simple as zip ties you end up gathering these items as you move along. I have my lucky bag full of the miscellanous items that I never leave at home.

First aid kit is a good idea too.

FJBRADY
08-09-2010, 05:41 PM
What I carry?




JB weld







Oh snap, Rudy you carry JB Weld? I got some on the bench yo! I need to pick some up for the lucky mistery bag....any guesses what else is in it?

Dr. Schlegs
08-09-2010, 06:19 PM
Starting out I don't didn't have much. I still don't, but my list is growing. I picked up pieces here and there. One of the Auto parts stores was changing over to a different brand of hand tools, so I picked up an almost full set of metrics and some other hand tools for $150. Pawn shops have a lot of good stuff too, and you can get for cheep. I have picked up some craftsman at a pawn shop once that was beat, and I turned it in for new.

I would add a flashlight and a section of hard brake line (coil it up and you are good to go) to the list of things needed.

After seeing some of the set-ups others in the club had I figured just a high-lift would be good and I could get rid of my stock bottle jack. Well after yesterday, while it is not the most sexy tool in the arsenal it proved to be very handy, and I am glad that I kept it. We placed it on a spare steel rim (base) and jacked up the axle. Somethings things are more useful than they appear.

nicholasandrews
08-09-2010, 06:40 PM
This is a great thread - thanks to everyone for posting your advice on items to have on the trail!!

leiniesred
08-09-2010, 07:12 PM
Steve's lucky mystery bag contents:

1 birfield
1 lucky fortune cookie toyota keychain
bag of pork rinds
Michele's lucky antenna fixin' pliers and bungee cord assortment

Dr. Schlegs
08-09-2010, 07:19 PM
Steve's lucky mystery bag contents:

1 birfield
1 lucky fortune cookie toyota keychain
bag of pork rinds
Michele's lucky antenna fixin' pliers and bungee cord assortment

:lmao: I get the feeling you where a boyscout or otherwise watch reruns of MacGyver. Do you have paperclips and shoestrings in your mystery bag too.

I just realized that I don't have simple stuff like electrical tape in my bag, or locktight.

Corbet
08-09-2010, 07:20 PM
Something I always carry that hardly even gets mentioned is a brightly colored jacket to wear on the side of the road in the event of a road side repair. Best to be seen from a distance if outside your vehicle

Romer
08-09-2010, 07:50 PM
Hi Brent,

I just gave a recovery gear 101 presentation, so I can take a stab a this for you, also. You can buy a kit pre-made but they seem kind of expensive and I had to build mine over time.. Anything over 100.00 and I have to get a Purchase Order approval, so I like to fly under the radar...

Basic kit
- 2 pair of gloves, one for under your drivers seat and one for your recovery bag $10.00
- Standard recovery strap, get the one with the highest rating, I have an ARB it was $66.00 at an event I was just at.
-tree saver strap, pretty standard across the board, usually $30-50.00
-2 or 3 D-shackles or D-rings look for 4T or higher on the WLL (weight load limit) rating, it is stampped on the shackle
-"High Lift" jack 48" is probably plenty 60" seems really big $50.00
-Shovel, resin handle vs. wood (just learned that one) $no more then $20.00
- Bill Burke's "Getting Unstuck" video $29.00
-bag or pack to carry all this in... I just got an ARB bag for $40.00, they also have some new water proof ones that are super cool...

Maybe more advanced Kit additions
-Snatch block $100.00
-Chain 15 feet of 70 gage ( i think that is the correct gage)
-Winch Warn 8000 will do..$600.00 nicer is a Superwinch probably like $1200.00
-Kinetic rope $120.00
-High lift adapter to fit your sliders, just got one super cool $45.00
-hitch receiver for recovery options if you have a hitch

I am sure I am leaving out some other stuff

Forgot my tool box of shinny new tools..

Chris lists an excellent set of Recovery tools and hopefully this answers your question

You made the comment about breaking stuff, are you asking what tools and spares you should carry IN ADDITION to the Recovery gear?

My daughter has a 99 4runner 3rd gen. We carry a rebuilt Toyota CV axel, two prybars, a (32 or 36) MM socket and a standard tool set with sockets wrenches etc. I can't remember the size socket we have in her storage box as its been a while. That socket is required to get the axle out.

We carry this because she broke an axel and had to limp back to camp where we replaced it with a carquest CV axle which broke the next day. So we carry a fully rebuilt spare with the tools to get it off

Also good to carry fluids (Brake, Oil, Gear, Tranny and Coolant if you have room)

The list is different for each vehicle and whether you want to do a full up repair or just be able to get off the trail. Yesterday 4 Knuckle bolts and washers and nuts where the parts keeping someone from getting off the trail. Fortunately, we had some and where able to fix them.

When you travel with similar vehicles, you can strategize who will carry what.

I personally carry, front and rear axles, one birfield, all the seals and gaskets and tools to replace that. A rear drive shaft. heater hoses, Fused links, fuses, several key relays required to start a vehicle, spare brake lines and fan belts. Probably a few other things as well

Don't forget the Duct tape and bailing wire (seriously)

Ken

Caribou Sandstorm
08-09-2010, 07:58 PM
Just thought of another thing you might want to have, as well.

A personal recovery bag..

Incase you ever have to walk away from your rig for help..

I have a comprehensive first aid kit, canteen, rain jacket, and a survival kit with all that survival stuff (matches, bundle of thin rope, leatherman, small duct tape roll, emergency foil blanket, hand held HAM, Spot receiver, protein bars, etc..)....

Convert
08-09-2010, 08:35 PM
Great thread and like Romer said each vehicle has its special requirements.
Bailout bag is a great idea Chris I need to set up one of those

RedCreeper
08-09-2010, 09:38 PM
everytime you go out and something breaks you will add that to your bag for the next time you go out. Did not see it but a bag of assorted nuts and bolts and hose clamps..... (Dan) would be good also.

rover67
08-09-2010, 10:34 PM
dang.. ok, now that I have some time:
I guess i never thought about what I carry in the truck..

I carry

a full set of 3/8" and 1/2" drive sockets, some spare front hubs, full set of open wrenches, socket for the lug nuts, socket for the pinion flanges, hub socket, screwdrivers, random bag of nuts and bolts, FIRE EXTINGUISHER, soldering iron, wiring, spare fuses, some relays with big breakers, a few spare headlight and taillight bulbs, lots of electrical tape, a roll of duct tape, zip ties, some bailing wire (which I love), locktite, some pinion nuts, about two quarts of gear oil, a gallon of water, a pack of ramen, and a bottle of break fluid, some doggie poop bags, a hi lift, 4 shackles, tree strap, snatch strap, gloves (which Tim tells me I need to use more often) I ditched the chain, a pulley, winch with synthetic rope, engine oil, bug spray, son screen first aid kit (pretty basic, but the bandaids are nice to have after a razorblade cut), usially lots aof water for me to drink, fridge with usually some beer and gatorade in it, fuel filter, fuel pump, hose clamps, hose for gas and heater stuff, cell phone, ham and CB, have teh 2010 repeater guide, and some maps from utah to wyoming with a compass a lighter (actually I think like 4 lighters) two headlamps, a can of copenhagen, and some cigarette tobacco for in case I gotta sit down and think. FOr trips to like back east or Utah, throw in all my spare parts that I have.

Most of that stuff was cumulative after the strap in the back seat and the right foot foolish enough to get me in a bad situation.

FJBRADY
08-10-2010, 06:33 AM
Steve's lucky mystery bag contents:

1 birfield
1 lucky fortune cookie toyota keychain
bag of pork rinds
Michele's lucky antenna fixin' pliers and bungee cord assortment

Mr Rudy, you know us all too well.:grinpimp::thumb:

ttubb
08-10-2010, 06:46 AM
I don't carry any of this stuff.........

I just make sure I wheel with these guys. :D

Seriously, great suggestions. I would add that IF you wheel by yourself, consider taking a mountain bike if you are going very far back off road.

I am in Crested Butte and sometimes there aren't any folks to go with. TT

FJBRADY
08-10-2010, 07:00 AM
I don't carry any of this stuff.........

I just make sure I wheel with these guys. :D

TT

That's right, Terry we have your back!

I figured you carried a satellite phone and just called in a chopper when in trouble. :thumb:

Caribou Sandstorm
08-10-2010, 08:18 AM
Brent, you will have to ask Marco about the fire extinguisher story, next time you see him...

DaveInDenver
08-10-2010, 08:43 AM
Yup good stuff. I you are wondering why a chain? If someone does not have a tow point use a chain in the frame rather than a strap so you don't ruin the strap by getting caught on sharp under body areas.
The chain is also useful to strap an axle to keep it from drooping, thus needing less jack height to stack rocks or work on something. You can use nylon straps for this but like you mention, there is a risk of cutting them. You can also use the chain to change the force or move an anchor point in odd riggings (this is by far why I've used chain in recovery, helping someone off in ditches in the snow usually means an weird rig-up). It's also tremendously useful in the spring when you have to wrap lots of dead fall. So I always have a 20-foot 5/16" chain standard duty (probably grade-30, just Home Depot level chain) galvanized with a regular clevis and a binder hook for dragging (I rate this at 2,000 lbf, but that is probably generous so it's just for utility) and usually a uber heavy grade-70 5-foot 3/8" chain with open clevis hooks (I rate it at 6,500 lbf).

Dr. Schlegs
08-10-2010, 08:46 AM
I thought of some other things Robbie had in his bag of tools. He had a ladies foot (the tool not the body part), a center punch, and a magnetic tray to hold those pesky little cone washers. You don't want to be losing those things amongst the dirt and rocks.

An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. Again I try to have things maintained, but things happen. It is good to have tools and spares with you on trail rides, otherwise people will not want to come and play with you:(.

Caribou Sandstorm
08-10-2010, 09:14 AM
Wow, what a coincidence, I too have a lady's foot and a wig..wait I think I picked up someone's mystery bag by mistake.....

Also the chain is great for attaching to boulders like a tree saver strap, only the chain is a strap saver because strap will get damaged under stress..

Happened to me in Ouray, last month and then the light bulb went on and I thought "hmmm, here is a great place where chain would have been a much better option.

Hudo4
08-10-2010, 09:50 AM
WOW! :eek: Thanks everyone for all the great info. I'm seriously needing to pick up some gear. I do usually drag along my emergency gear that I've picked over the year for backpacking. But a ton of the other stuff I'm going to have to write down and start picking up. Great Lists!!

Fire extinguisher story huh Marco?? I bet that's a fun story.

Dr. Schlegs
08-10-2010, 09:54 AM
Ok, I'm sorry for asking such a question, but I am learning as many others are. How much length of chain and what size of chain is heavy enough. Granted, if the chain is too big you will not be able to manipulate it around the frame/tow-points.

FJBRADY
08-10-2010, 10:02 AM
a wig..wait I think I picked up someone's mystery bag by mistake.....



That was my old bag, now I carry Ron Popeal's hair in a can in my bag!

and some cigarette tobacco


Good idea on the Cigs so you can smoke them after a lengthy recovery or trail fix :grinpimp::smokin:

Dr. Schlegs
08-10-2010, 10:07 AM
I could have used a nice cigar and a little scotch after the recovery to help put my nerves at ease. However, seeing Robbie, Romer, and Brady trekking up the hill lowered my anxiety level. Thank you again you guys are the greatest.:bowdown:

rover67
08-10-2010, 10:56 AM
WOW! :eek: Thanks everyone for all the great info. I'm seriously needing to pick up some gear. I do usually drag along my emergency gear that I've picked over the year for backpacking. But a ton of the other stuff I'm going to have to write down and start picking up. Great Lists!!

Fire extinguisher story huh Marco?? I bet that's a fun story.

I've had to use on one my truck once and on somebody else's car another time. They come in handy...

after a month or two of driving the Rover around with no starter it bacame second nature to just park it on a hill and roll it to start it. The starter crank worked too, but it was a bit more of a pain.. Anyways, we were in a field in the middle of the night driving around in waist high grass way too fast and got high centered on a downed oak tree we didn't see.

So, I left the truck there idling while i hiked to the 24hour harwdware store that was a few blocks away to get a chain saw. Got back with my new chain saw, gallon of gas and oil mix and started whittling away at the tree trunk. A few minutes into it my friend taps me on the shoulder and points at the fire starting under the truck next to the exhaust.

I reached for my extinguisher (see, even at the dumb age of 17 I had one.. kinda) and ripped the pin out and squeezed the lever.. all i got was about a second of squirt and it pooped out. I guess it had leaked down. remember to check your extinguishers every once in a while..

So I turned around and ran to the closest store i could find that was open, ran in ripped the extinguisher of of the wall and ran back. By the time I got there the truck was burning pretty good and the rubber fuel lines were leaking fuel making the fire bigger. I put the fire out, but it was a dry chemical extinguisher so the embers kept lighting it all back up again. The fuel made it interestig too.. Pretty soon that fire extinguisher was out and we watched the truck burn. then the fire department came and squirted it down from the street.

tow truck driver didn't want to touch it that night so he took us home.

Next morning we went back out there and the new chainsaw I had left there in the hurry was stolen.

Bummer.

Another time I pulled up nexxt to a guy on the hwy whose cat it looked like was on fire from burning grease. I told him his car was on fire. He stared at me. I went and got my extinguisher and put it out and handed it to him.

he just kinda stood there.

Snowrun
08-10-2010, 11:01 AM
If you spend lots of time out east I would also throw in a pull pal. It is really nice when there are no rocks or trees to winch off. Also comes in handy when you forget your winch extension at home......
I also carry a Highlift base and off road kit(in case you need to hand winch).
As far as chain I carry 25 feet of grade 70 3/8 inch with grab hooks.

RedCreeper
08-10-2010, 11:10 AM
Nice Marco, i was in Maryland and stopped at a rest stop after getting my rig from the shop and noticed a U Haul trailer smoking. The driver never noticed it for the last 6 or 7 hours. When he stopped the air was not there to cool it down and lit up. He supposedly enguaged the mechanical brake on the trailer to much some where near SC and never knew how to work it. Needless to say the trailer about melted with his car on it as he called U Haul to see what to do or get help. I took my recovery gear out from the trail ride the weekend before so i did not have mine. Lesson learned for him and me to always carry it.

Dr. Schlegs
08-10-2010, 11:30 AM
When I worked in a garage, there was a guy that limped his car in with Heat Shrink around his break-line. Not the safest thing in the world but it worked enough to get him to the shop. Personally, I was surprised that it was able to hold up but he had electrical tape laird over it several times.

nakman
08-10-2010, 11:41 AM
I have older straps that have been demoted to chain-style duty, like moving rocks around, the only real chains I have are some hi-lift accessories. I've also got a "winter bag" that I toss in for FEAT nights and snow runs, it's got stuff like a set of transport hooks, hi-lift base, etc. But I don't bring all that junk wheeling every time.

At some point you need to find the balance with what you really need and what's too much crap in the truck. I'd rather get creative and McGyver something together to get me home, than deal with a big heavy tub of junk I don't need.. another reason to not wheel alone.

Caribou Sandstorm
08-10-2010, 12:01 PM
My Alfa Spider had an engine fire once, leaky fuel line..I was trying to sell it and showed it to a guy, only a few blocks from where I live now, then got back on University and Evans headed to the shop to get the leak fixed and poof smoke came out of the bonnet....

I opened the bonnet and flames started shooting up...I had just taken all the stuff out of the trunk I normally keep in it, like a fire exinguisher...

I just stood there, called the fire department and then someone behind me walked up with a fire extinguisher.. Probably only burned for 2-3 minutes but that seems like forever when it is happening..Fire department showed up and sprayed the hell out of it with their foam...

6 months in the shop and then 1 month at the body shop and it was as good as new. You couldn't even tell it had ever happened unless you were there..

I have a fire extinguisher in every car now. That is standard OP for sure..

Hudo4
08-10-2010, 12:59 PM
Heck! After Chris's and Marco's fires stories I think I better go get a few extinguishers. :D So far I've not had any fire issues with cars....a few with boats when I was in the Coast Guard but nothing major.

DaveInDenver
08-10-2010, 01:39 PM
Don't forget to have them around the house, too!

I once set my basement floor drain on fire (furnace pilot light + aerosol anything = not good) and I guess the water in the trap was low because it just kept burning. I dunno if it's possible to blow up a sewer line but since I have fire extinguishers everywhere I didn't find out that day. I also started dumping a couple of buckets of water down the floor drain the 1st of every month to keep the trap from drying out...

Tch2fly
08-10-2010, 02:54 PM
The important items have been posted and as Nakman said, over time you learn what to take and what to leave home. I like the fact that we all have the same basic kit but each of us also carry some different/unique items, that usually mean finding the right tool for the job in somebody's rig. If you wheel alone your kit may need to be more comprehensive then someone who is always in a group.


I see several people mention chains and just as important as the strength of the chain is the type of hook used.
There are two basic types of hooks, Grab hooks and Sling hooks (often called "slip" hooks).
20256
A grab hook is designed to hook back to a chain, such as connecting chains together, shortening a chain or creating a loop in a chain.
A Sling hook is designed to hook to another object via ring, shackle or a designated rigging point. They are sometimes called "slip" hook, I assume this comes from their use to create a choker, e.g. wrapping around a bundle of logs to drag them but this is extremely hazardous and should only be a last resort in a recovery situation.
I suggest having both because they each serve a specific purpose.

Tim also mentioned "transport" hooks and I have a quite a selection from my days in the towing/recovery industry but I do not suggest using them for certain types of recovery.
For pulling strangers cars out of snow banks they can be invaluable because most cars lack real "tow hooks" but most have a transportation tie down point that can be used. On the trail they can be used to stabilize a rig while winching/lifting or for pulling a disabled truck along a trail but NOT for heavy extraction/recovery. (the hooks and frames are not rated for that)

Caribou Sandstorm
08-10-2010, 03:30 PM
This thread rocks, thanks for the hook info Mike!

Dr. Schlegs
08-10-2010, 04:26 PM
Could someone please answer the question of how much chain and what weight of chain would be ideal?

SteveH
08-10-2010, 04:35 PM
I found myself chronically removing my 'trail gloves' from any given truck, so I bought a 6 pack of the cloth/leather gloves at Harbor Freight ($7) and took a fat permanent marker and wrote 'FJ40' on the cloth back of one pair, leaving that pair in the '40, and '4Runner' on another, and 'FZJ-80' on another. Now, when I spot this pair of gloves in the garage, by accident, I know where its home is. What this really means is that I have too many trucks and not nearly enough brain.

Tch2fly
08-10-2010, 04:51 PM
Could someone please answer the question of how much chain and what weight of chain would be ideal?

Sorry I missed that in your earlier post.

How much? tough question, you never really know but in general a few short sections should be enough to supplement your winch cable or straps for extraction or to stablize a rig during recovery. I have several sections in lengths of 6' and 12'.

Chris mentioned Grade 70 (AKA Transport chain), IMO this should be the minimum grade for heavy recovery work but Grade 43 High Test should be suitable for many situations, Grade 30 is too light for anything except pulling a disabled rig on a flat surface (working loads are approx 1/2 of grade 43). If you can afford Grade 80 Alloy great :D

Here are specs charts for Grades 43 and 70
20273
20274

Dr. Schlegs
08-10-2010, 11:59 PM
Thanks Mike this is very helpful. I guess there is a National Association for almost anything these days. The website is very informative, I'm learning about all kinds of random things this week. I guess I will be looking for chain tomorrow at Home Depot. I have been picking up more tools today, and have a long side front inner axle being held for me. I figure have one bag of tools that gets moved between the 40 and the 80. I even picked up a 1/2 drive air gun, that will fit in the tool bag. (Can't wait to install the ARB's and York Compressors.) Then have parts specify to each rig that remains with the vehicle.

SteveH
08-11-2010, 08:55 AM
The 'Trucker Chain' sold at Harbor Freight (with hooks) has served me well over the years. It's long enough, but not way too long. 3/8", 14', Grade 43. They also have a 5/16" grade grade 70 chain. These chains come with closed hooks on the ends and the 14' piece is $20. I sometimes use a short piece of chain around a sharp/rough object so that I don't destroy my nylon strap. Having said that, using a strap and chain together can be deadly under the right circumstances. Always consider where energy might be stored and what will happen if it releases.

nakman
08-11-2010, 10:12 AM
.... I even picked up a 1/2 drive air gun, that will fit in the tool bag. (Can't wait to install the ARB's and York Compressors.) ....

Air tools rule in the shop for big projects. In the truck I used to carry an air impact driver, then a cordless impact driver, but then I put all that crap back in the garage.

My opinion is air tools makes a trail repair only slightly more efficient and it's not worth the added weight and size of the junk, or the hassle of pulling it all out. Sure it can make quick work of a pinion nut or t-case output nut, but in the end you're talking taking a 3 hour trail repair down to maybe 2 hours and 52 minutes...

Your CO2 system doesn't need another reason to run out of gas before you fill up your last tire, and your OBA system doesn't need yet another reason to blow through oil and get hot.. bringing air tools on the trail just wears those down prematurely. again, IMO. :D

corsair23
08-11-2010, 10:50 AM
My opinion is air tools makes a trail repair only slightly more efficient and it's not worth the added weight and size of the junk, or the hassle of pulling it all out.

Agreed, except for the times when the parts are installed with an air gun vs. a torque wrench using the right torque settings :hill: - If it hadn't been for Ricardo's air and Steve's air gun we might all still be up there camping around Kevin's 80. The lug nuts were bad enough but the top caliper bolt (which is a PITA to get to while wrenching in the garage) wouldn't budge. Robbie tried all sorts of tricks, some I'd never seen, to no avail. Ultimately it was the air gun that saved the day.

lilred4runner
08-11-2010, 04:25 PM
Just posted the newb question a few minutes ago. thanks for the good info.

TIMZTOY
08-11-2010, 07:29 PM
When I worked in a garage, there was a guy that limped his car in with Heat Shrink around his break-line. Not the safest thing in the world but it worked enough to get him to the shop. Personally, I was surprised that it was able to hold up but he had electrical tape laird over it several times.

thats a damn good idea, i had a complete blowout of my brake lines in the front calipers on my 89 taco, while driving 80 mph on the highway, and aproching road construction.. you can only slow down to about 15 mph with gears alone then you start accelrating again.. knowing this trick would have saved me alot of headace

Heck! After Chris's and Marco's fires stories I think I better go get a few extinguishers. :D So far I've not had any fire issues with cars....a few with boats when I was in the Coast Guard but nothing major.

diddo, and i think come payday I too am going to go buy a fire extinguisher

leiniesred
08-12-2010, 09:04 AM
halon fire extinguishers
http://www.aircraftspruce.com/catalog/pspages/h3rhalon.php

transit clusters (grade70)
http://www.awdirect.com/cm-grade-70-cluster-hook-t-hook-r-hook-mini-j-hook-93169/hooks/

All kinds of cool rigging stuff
http://www.tulsachain.com/
grade120 chain
http://www.tulsachain.com/asccustompages/products.asp?categoryID=402

rover67
08-12-2010, 09:11 AM
http://www.aircraftspruce.com/catalog/pspages/h3rhalon.php

yeah, that's a great site..

this is what I carry in the 60 and what is in Allison's Jetta:

http://www.aircraftspruce.com/catalog/pspages/c352ts.php

After using dry chemical extinguishers a few times I'll never use them again... thye are too messy and corrosive. Halon/Halotron is the way to go if you can afford it.

Also, as an FYI you can get old Halon extinguishers serviced still, they just suck them down and refill with reclaimed halon.

Corbet
08-12-2010, 09:55 AM
I guess I will be looking for chain tomorrow at Home Depot.

Home Depot is probably not the place to go looking for Grade 70 transport chain or better. I picked up a 20' section of 3/8 grade 70 with hooks at my local Napa for $40ish? a few years back. At the time it was the best deal I could find.



After using dry chemical extinguishers a few times I'll never use them again... thye are too messy and corrosive. Halon/Halotron is the way to go if you can afford it.

Finally someone else who shares my opinion of chemical extingushers. I will never use one again unless forced. Cleaning some chemical out of a steel floored 40 is one thing. (It still sucks I know from experience) But replacing the carpet of an 80 would be far for expensive than the original cost of a Halotron unit.

Another note on chemical units. From what I have read you should store them on their side in a vehicle to prevent them from "packing" at the bottom. At home no big deal. But the vibration of a vehicle can lead decreased performance the day you goto use it. Nothing worse than thinking your prepared and getting nothing from your extinguisher.

rhyary
08-12-2010, 01:49 PM
Marco,
Thanks for the link to the fire ext. Just got one.