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4runner luv
08-17-2010, 09:26 PM
I have seen some write ups or mentions of accessory fuse blocks. Can anyone suggest where I might get a decent one at a reasonable price? Actually looking for something that maybe I can wire up so that 4 or 5 fuses are always on, and 4 or 5 are relayed to only be on with the ignition.

Thanks in advance,
Shayn

nakman
08-17-2010, 10:37 PM
I've had good luck with the Painless ones... the gauge of wire is a little small but as long as you're not going to run anything too crazy off of it, it's fine. http://www.jegs.com/i/Painless+Performance+Products/764/70207/10002/-1 you get 3 "always on" and 4 "switched on."

I've got them running light relays, fridges, seat heaters, CB's, other random 12v outlets, multiple LED's, york clutch, more LED's, etc. If you get some big mega amp for the stereo, or a 1000 watt inverter or something, I'd probably run those direct to the battery, but these Painless ones are sweet for little accessories.

4runner luv
08-17-2010, 10:50 PM
Perfect! Thanks.

DanS
08-17-2010, 11:17 PM
http://www.keepitcleanwiring.com/catalog/details/FBLOCK12/10-ATC-Fuse-Block-with-Cover

I bought them from Yearwood Performance in Albuquerque, but I'm sure they are probably sold in the Denver area too... Happy enough I bought a second one. Half of them powered from one source, the other half from another. One in the 40 (part of the 3B swap) has hot/ACC sections, the other has hot/IGN sections. I used a solenoid from McMaster Carr to control the power for the switched sides, so that the control can handle MUCH more than 30Amps (which is my beef with the Painless ones--and the price).

High quality wire, and 12GA wire throughout. Less than half the price of the painless, but you have to do more--it's JUST a fuse block.

Dan

Hulk
08-17-2010, 11:51 PM
I have two of these (http://www.westmarine.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?productId=17243&catalogId=10001&langId=-1&storeId=11151&storeNum=10109&subdeptNum=10598&classNum=11287), one in each Land Cruiser. You can get them from your local West Marine store (there is one on County Line Road).

corsair23
08-18-2010, 01:16 AM
Inside or outside application?

If inside I have one of the ones that Slee installs (or use to anyway) seen HERE (http://www.sleeoffroad.com/technical/tz_interior_fusebox.htm)

I have just the fuse block, no cover, relay, or anything else. I ended up going the Blue Sea route like Hulk posted up. Mainly because I'm electrically challenged and didn't want to futz with trying to figure out the switched power setup :o. That and the Blue Sea blocks have ground lugs so once you establish a known good ground to the unit you have known good ground positions on the block. IMO that saves time when wiring stuff up even if I have to run a longer ground wire back to the block vs. finding a ground near whatever it is I'm adding (like my HAM radio).

One issue with the West Marine units is I'm pretty sure they are either all switched or all always on, no split.

If you're interested in the block I didn't use let me know. IIRC it is made by Wrangler.

coax
08-18-2010, 08:24 AM
Great thread, and just in time! :thumb: I'm just about to get a fuse block to hook up the aux lights for a (hopefully) upcoming trip.

I've had good luck with the Painless ones... the gauge of wire is a little small but as long as you're not going to run anything too crazy off of it, it's fine. http://www.jegs.com/i/Painless+Performance+Products/764/70207/10002/-1 you get 3 "always on" and 4 "switched on."

What wire were you able to tap into for the switched? And is the block installed in the engine bay or in the cab? I was initially thinking of going the blue sea route, but the fact that I'd probably leave something turned on when the car wasn't running makes me reconsider. But the one thing stopping me was trying to figure out which wire to tap for that. I think I read a few folks on mud tap the cig. lighter for in-cab work, but is there something better in the engine bay?

nakman
08-18-2010, 08:36 AM
Great thread, and just in time! :thumb: I'm just about to get a fuse block to hook up the aux lights for a (hopefully) upcoming trip.



What wire were you able to tap into for the switched? And is the block installed in the engine bay or in the cab? I was initially thinking of going the blue sea route, but the fact that I'd probably leave something turned on when the car wasn't running makes me reconsider. But the one thing stopping me was trying to figure out which wire to tap for that. I think I read a few folks on mud tap the cig. lighter for in-cab work, but is there something better in the engine bay?

I've got both- one inside in the rear cargo area, and one under the hood. I would recommend you put it inside, presuming most of your accessories will also be inside, as my grommet on the DS firewall is completely packed with wires...


I am tapping into the fuse block that's by your left knee, into the radio fuse, for the pink wire that triggers the relay to turn on the accessory-only fuses. Yeah there's probably something in the engine bay too, you just need it to be 12v when the key is on, and nothing when the key is off.. the only load is enough juice to flip a relay.

Jacket
08-18-2010, 09:19 AM
I have two of these (http://www.westmarine.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?productId=17243&catalogId=10001&langId=-1&storeId=11151&storeNum=10109&subdeptNum=10598&classNum=11287), one in each Land Cruiser. You can get them from your local West Marine store (there is one on County Line Road).

This is what I use as well - very nice product and a good price ($40-50). I always run a heavyish gauge wire (6 or 8 awg depending on load and length) from the battery into the cab and to the fuse block. Make sure you include an in-line fusible link if you run off the battery. Then you can just run small wires from the block to the accessories.

Hulk
08-18-2010, 11:16 AM
Make sure you include an in-line fusible link if you run off the battery. Then you can just run small wires from the block to the accessories.

I didn't do this -- should I get one? :confused: Where would I find such an item?

Pardon my ignorance: why do I need this? It's a fuse for the fuse box?

DaveInDenver
08-18-2010, 11:43 AM
Pardon my ignorance: why do I need this? It's a fuse for the fuse box?
Fuses, fusible links and circuit breakers protect your wire should the insulation fail because the combined load exceeds the conductor's rating or a short. No matter how it happens, if the feed conductor is asked to carry more current than it's capable, it heats up. Heat causes fires. If you used a fuse or breaker that is also fine, fusible links are convenient because they are usually easier to work with in tight spots. Their downside is they only work once and might be a bit more PITA to fix compared to pushing reset or replacing a fuse.

corsair23
08-18-2010, 12:28 PM
I didn't do this -- should I get one? :confused: Where would I find such an item?

Pardon my ignorance: why do I need this? It's a fuse for the fuse box?

Dave's got you covered on the need aspect. As for where to find what you need it will depend on what you decided to go with. In my case I found a bunch of stuff on sale online from an audio company years ago and got my wire, fuses, battery terminals, etc. from then. I went with the ANL type fuse (http://www.bcae1.com/fuses.htm) (toward the bottom of the page) and a water resistant style holder like this (http://http//www.hifisoundconnection.com/Shop/Control/Product/fp/vpid/1547136/vpcsid/0/SFV/30046). I fused thise based on my max load now off the block + some to account for future needs. These things you could pick up online or any audio store like Quality Audio on County Line Rd etc.

I was really interested in going the circuit breaker route (I think Corbet went this route and did a write up on it here) because you don't have to worry about mucking with fuses and can shut off power to the entire aux block a little easier if needed. But, I already had the stuff mentioned above so for once in my life I decided to use what I already bought :hill:

For those interested, here was the write up I did on MUD: LINK (http://forum.ih8mud.com/80-series-tech/303547-lx450-center-console-removal.html)

Just scroll to the bottom as the thread started off as a "how to remove the center console" question. No shots of the inline fuse at the battery though but the fuse sits right on the back side of the battery box, nice and close to the battery.

coax
08-18-2010, 12:56 PM
Does anyone know if using one of the AM1 or AM2 fusible links would be a good fit for an aux fuse box? I'm not sure what they are rated to.

I hadn't even considered putting one in (good idea!), but it seems that having an extra OEM fusible link in the system might come in handy if you blow one in the main system for the engine? Then you are just without say extra lights and such if you swap them out. Just a thought...though I suppose that they are only 10 bucks or something and I could just buy extra's anway

DaveInDenver
08-18-2010, 01:01 PM
I think AM1 is a 50A fusible link. Don't use that as gospel. If so, then it would be fine to protect about a 8AWG or larger wire.

Air Randy
08-18-2010, 01:46 PM
I would use a regular old in-line fuse holder that uses a blade type fuse instead of a fusible link. It's cheap and easy to buy spare fuses and easy to determine if you have a blown fuse. Plus you can buy the various sizes of in-line fuse holders at WalMart, Checker, Autozone, etc.

DaveInDenver
08-18-2010, 01:58 PM
I would use a regular old in-line fuse holder that uses a blade type fuse instead of a fusible link. It's cheap and easy to buy spare fuses and easy to determine if you have a blown fuse. Plus you can buy the various sizes of in-line fuse holders at WalMart, Checker, Autozone, etc.
I agree, fuses makes sense. Problem is that the biggest ATC type blade fuse is 40A and most of those molded inline holders are 10AWG or smaller, so maybe 30A max. That might or might not work, but is fairly limiting (particularly if you are running a 12 position fuse block) or just want to feed with something heavier to minimize voltage drop. The Maxi or FLB type fuses are available in higher currents, but unfortunately aren't usually easy to find at Autozone and what-not, although you can get them at NAPA, car audio and marine shops.

Jacket
08-18-2010, 03:52 PM
I used one of these bad boys:

http://www.amazon.com/STINGER-SCBM100-Marine-Circuit-Breaker/dp/B002LARRTE

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41AuaIe-GBL._SS500_.jpg