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View Full Version : A lazy morning at the cabin


bh4rnnr
12-27-2010, 05:45 PM
Went up to the cabin this morning since I had the day off. Sure was nice up there! Just wish there was snow:(. And i've been in a Ansel Adams/ Enos Mill mood lately. Will post more later.

:beer:

RockRunner
12-27-2010, 09:35 PM
Nice shot, streaks in the clouds look kind of cool but then again...........JMHO

bh4rnnr
12-28-2010, 09:08 PM
Nice shot, streaks in the clouds look kind of cool but then again...........JMHO

Well, I cant do much about those jets flying overhead....

And opinions are good, lets me know what i'm doing wrong.

bh4rnnr
12-28-2010, 09:21 PM
Getting back to the pics.

:beer:

Not even a mile from the cabin:cool:
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Was going to walk to the pond in the mid meadow. Yeah, didnt get to far...
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"Indian Creek".
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bh4rnnr
12-28-2010, 09:37 PM
Close up of Indian Creek.
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So the pond is not to far from the cabin, hiking distance. Didn't make it this time. Blame it on the balmy weather!
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Blue Spruce (Picea pungens)
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Lars
12-31-2010, 08:12 PM
very nice!!

RockRunner
01-01-2011, 02:54 AM
Well, I cant do much about those jets flying overhead....

And opinions are good, lets me know what i'm doing wrong.

Nothing wrong I liked it, I love clouds etc. disturbed and jet trails.

RockRunner
01-01-2011, 02:59 AM
The last two were cool cloud shots too.

What are you doing to get the B/W effect, the camera or software? Reason I ask is if it is just the camera and not computer generated, they are OK. But if you are reworking these with Photo Shop or ? they lack pop to me. Again just my opinion and as you see I don't post pics often because I don't think they are post worthy.

bh4rnnr
01-02-2011, 05:03 PM
The last two were cool cloud shots too.

What are you doing to get the B/W effect, the camera or software? Reason I ask is if it is just the camera and not computer generated, they are OK. But if you are reworking these with Photo Shop or ? they lack pop to me. Again just my opinion and as you see I don't post pics often because I don't think they are post worthy.

I'm taking the photos in BW with the camera. Been using BW more to help whent taking color.

:beer:

Hulk
01-02-2011, 09:25 PM
Dave, that is some great information.

How much of that can be accomplished these days with Photoshop? Do you still think shooting with a filter is as essential as it was in the pre-computer age?

I need to take a class somewhere.

Inukshuk
01-02-2011, 10:07 PM
Dave, that is some great information.

How much of that can be accomplished these days with Photoshop? Do you still think shooting with a filter is as essential as it was in the pre-computer age?

I need to take a class somewhere.

A lot can be accomplished with Photoshop, but you are always limited by the information captured by the camera. After the Maze trip where I used a borrowed polarizing filter, I'll always use one outside.

As far as a class, I have a professional photographer friend (find Michael McConnell through my FB page) who keeps threatening to do a class. He's mildly into wheeling too and maybe we can corral him for a day. Another friend, Dmitry, who some of you met on the Spooky Night Run is also way into it and I learn a lot from him.

Trapper50cal
01-11-2011, 12:06 PM
It may be a "non"purist point of view but as a designer, the first thing I see is too much neutral gray. To my mind, as previously stated, the better the RAW material (info captured by camera) the better. You start with good ingredients, you have more wiggle room. The first thing I would do is convert it to grayscale and hit it with a little brightness then contrast. There are other ways (saturation, threshold, color balance prior to GS conversion) to get that nice balance of darks and lights while maintaining definition of the subject matter. And as previously stated as well, filters can help create contrast by being spectrum-biased. There is no "Bad" artistic expression....just tinker until you get something you like, but start with getting as much visual detail & information as possible. The rest relies on that.

smslavin
01-11-2011, 12:31 PM
How much of that can be accomplished these days with Photoshop? Do you still think shooting with a filter is as essential as it was in the pre-computer age?

Most of it can be done in post. The biggest issue is learning to think in B/W and not color. Once you understand in your eye how things will convert, you can adjust your exposures and what you meter on. The rule I follow is to expose for the highlights and print for the shadows.

Think about what you want the final image to look like before you click the shutter. If you looked at an Ansel image straight from the film and then compared it to what the final print looks like, you'd be floored. 'Moon over Hernandez' is an excellent example.

It's all about learning to 'see'.

Dave, yay for TMax! Very smooth B/W film. Tri-X and HP5 are still my all time favs.

bh4rnnr
01-12-2011, 01:26 PM
Most of it can be done in post. The biggest issue is learning to think in B/W and not color. Once you understand in your eye how things will convert, you can adjust your exposures and what you meter on. The rule I follow is to expose for the highlights and print for the shadows.

Think about what you want the final image to look like before you click the shutter. If you looked at an Ansel image straight from the film and then compared it to what the final print looks like, you'd be floored. 'Moon over Hernandez' is an excellent example.

It's all about learning to 'see'.

Dave, yay for TMax! Very smooth B/W film. Tri-X and HP5 are still my all time favs.

This is the biggest reason why i've been playing more with B/W when shooting. Been doing it less than a year (shooting B/W) and am already impressed:cool:.

:beer:

RedCreeper
01-12-2011, 05:49 PM
Just skimming threw the threads and may have missed someting but one thing to remember is in digital what is black is black and white is white. Not much shadow detail. That is one reason they are still shooting film in Japan for weddings. And the cost of digital over there. Exposure is everything, photoshop is just a crutch i mean a tool to fine tune the images. Expose it right from the start and the rest is easy, sort of....... One of my pet peaves in the studio when i was training the photographers is they would just go hog wild shooting very loose and then come back later and fix it. Time wasted in front of the puter and not behind the camera shooting more. One tool next to the filters i find invaluable it a custom white balance for neutral color. If there is time to do it and the conditions are right i use a custom white balance. saves a lot of time sitting in front of that puter correcting images. I like old school BW pics but still need to expose it right the first time.

my .02