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TIMZTOY
01-08-2011, 10:25 AM
but i already knew this, i saw it on yahoo. i just thougt id share the artical with you
(http://autos.yahoo.com/articles/autos_content_landing_pages/1650/eight-facts-about-warming-up-your-car-in-winter/)

Hulk
01-08-2011, 11:07 AM
That's a good article. However, I still sometimes need to warm up my old FJ40 on a cold winter's morning. But it's got the original carburetor, so the new rules don't apply as much.

TIMZTOY
01-08-2011, 11:56 AM
That's a good article. However, I still sometimes need to warm up my old FJ40 on a cold winter's morning. But it's got the original carburetor, so the new rules don't apply as much.

carburated motors yes ! thats were the habit's come from

FJBRADY
01-08-2011, 01:33 PM
I will be warming up the Tundra in the driveway M,T,W this week since it will be frigid.

:homer:

DanS
01-08-2011, 02:52 PM
I'm going to say that I generally agree with this, but when it's REALLY cold, I idle. My 22RE was a a great little engine, never leaked a drop. Until one day in the Yukon (around -45C, IIRC) I had left it plugged in all night, and idled it for a few minutes only, not even close to operating temperature, when I hit the road. By that afternoon, my motor was dripping oil. As I headed south and things warmed up, I was a driving oil slick. By the time I got to Colorado I was getting 35mpg--on engine oil. Seriously: driving oil slick.

That wasn't exactly the first time my truck had seen real cold, but that was the first and only time I had started driving after only 5 minutes of idling. I can't believe that was a coincidence. The seals all have to come up to temperature gradually, IMHO, which isn't normally a big deal, but at those really cold temperatures it is.

Now that I have a diesel, I start it, then hop in the shower before I head into town. I know that idling builds a glaze on the cylinder walls, but Floyd Hill easily takes care of that for me. And the little truck uses so little fuel at idle that it doesn't bother me at all. I wouldn't idle the FJ-60 as long though, because it costs so much to gas up anyway!

Dan

DaveInDenver
01-08-2011, 02:55 PM
I agree that there's no need to let it warm up completely at idle, but it's still not good to jump in a cold car and start driving it hard instantly.

My reasoning for this is that while the engine warms up the motor oil pretty quickly the tranny and axle gear is still very thick and is warming mostly through friction. I put my t-case into neutral and let the engine spin the tranny in 4th gear for a minute or two to give the synchros a chance to get a bath. I also try to drive gently for a mile or two before getting on I-25 to give the diffs a little time to warm and lower the gear oil viscosity.

Notice that all those recommendations are due to environmental concerns and not for a long life of your truck. So you have to weigh why people who practice that old way of idling in the winter for a while are also usually driving old junk, which might not be a coincidence. Now whether or not car puffing is bad for air quality, probably, so to each his own.