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DenCo40
02-13-2011, 08:14 PM
I would like to know what timing degree people use on their 2f for high altitude (above 5280 elev.) I know some people have luck advancing it a little helps...

subzali
02-13-2011, 10:23 PM
I think stock is 7 degrees, some people run up around 11 degrees or so. I've had people tell me to advance it until it pings/knocks at load and then back off a couple degrees. I'm a couple degrees more advanced, not exactly sure how much.

SteveH
02-14-2011, 07:50 AM
One rule of thumb is to have the steel ball just at the edge of the sight window - which is about 4 degrees advanced, as Matt said. If you have pinging or hard starting, you're too far advanced. You won't get a huge performance boost, but every bit counts.

ttubb
02-14-2011, 07:51 AM
I am in Crested Butte (10,000) and I have been running about 13 degrees for the last two years. Works great and this is on a freshly overhauled engine with a shaved head (higher compression).
I just adjusted the distributor to the best/smoothest running point. T

DenCo40
02-14-2011, 03:57 PM
I'll give that a shot. I have been running it stock but heard something a while back about advancing the timing a bit seems to run better at altittude.
Thanks

CBone
02-14-2011, 04:30 PM
I'm running at 11

Hulk
02-14-2011, 04:36 PM
I'm running at 11

"These go to eleven."
UeOXsA8sp_E

Rzeppa
02-15-2011, 02:28 PM
Stock is 7 BTDC, which corresponds to the BB on the flywheel. I run anywhere between 9-15 depending on which Cruiser and what the setup is and how worn out the motor is. Lower compression = more advance needed. It also depends a lot on how much centrifugal advance the distributor has, and it depends on whether you have vacuum advance, vacuum retard, both, dual advance, etc. I'd start at 11 and then play around with it, that's what I normally do on my own rigs. If you have points, don't forget to set them first! Correct gap is 0.018" or just about the thickness of a matchbook cover.

Rezarf
02-15-2011, 10:29 PM
I am in Crested Butte (10,000) and I have been running about 13 degrees for the last two years. Works great and this is on a freshly overhauled engine with a shaved head (higher compression).
I just adjusted the distributor to the best/smoothest running point. T

I use this approach too. I set it, then run it up a hill under full power and see how it acts. I am at the edge of the window.

Stock is 7 BTDC, which corresponds to the BB on the flywheel. I run anywhere between 9-15 depending on which Cruiser and what the setup is and how worn out the motor is. Lower compression = more advance needed. It also depends a lot on how much centrifugal advance the distributor has, and it depends on whether you have vacuum advance, vacuum retard, both, dual advance, etc. I'd start at 11 and then play around with it, that's what I normally do on my own rigs. If you have points, don't forget to set them first! Correct gap is 0.018" or just about the thickness of a matchbook cover.

Thats why I switched out to a fj60 electronic ignition... no mo' points! :thumb:

Rzeppa
02-16-2011, 01:45 PM
I use this approach too. I set it, then run it up a hill under full power and see how it acts. I am at the edge of the window.

Edge of the window = 2 from the center, so you're at 9. I use a dialback light, which is how I know where the edge of the window is! :thumb:

DenCo40
02-16-2011, 09:12 PM
So I advanced the timing a bit somewhere around 9-10 degrees. I ran to the store for a test drive. I noticed a little difference, seems to idle a bit better. Maybe I'll notice more on the freeway with mileage or maybe an extra .0000002 hp. ;)