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View Full Version : FJ40 on a tow dolly


cbmontgo
03-29-2011, 09:42 AM
How well does a 40 tow on a 2-wheel tow dolly? Do you need a heavy-duty one or will a basic one work?

What would you guys say a stock 40 weighs without a top? 3,500 pounds maybe?

MDH33
03-29-2011, 09:51 AM
I've only towed a 40 a few times, both flat and on a dolly. Worked much better on the dolly than flat. Also, the tow vehicle makes a big difference. 3500 without top and doors sounds about right. (stock, without full cage, winch, big tires, etc.)

cbmontgo
03-29-2011, 09:54 AM
Cool. I am thinking about towing it to Moab this spring for a weekend trip and doing some light trail riding. I have never been; that CM 2011 thread makes me drool!

cbmontgo
03-29-2011, 10:44 AM
By the way, if anyone has one of these that I can borrow for a long weekend in exchange for beer or cash, let me know. I am checking Craigslist too, but I really don't want to have to store it somewhere the other 364 days a year that I don't use it.

SteveH
03-29-2011, 12:22 PM
I have towed my '40 behind a dolly, as well as many other vehicles. For that long a trip, I'd remove the rear driveshaft, for the sake of your xfer case, transmission, etc. Also, I have found that you need to check/tighten the wheel straps at least 3 times, and more if it rains (they stretch when wet). I have an 'American Tow Dolly' (sold new out of Fort Morgan, CO, for $1120) and my only problem with it is that it doesn't swivel very easily, and this makes the towed vehicle bind and then 'pop' when you go around corners. Very annoying, and it can loosen the straps due to the shock. This dolly is very wide, which is good and overall gets the job done. Newer versions of this dolly have plastic slipper shims to prevent the binding, supposedly.

Just be aware that you get what you pay for, some dollies are very light-duty junk, and most need tires (and 14" heavy duty tires are hard to find and expensive). I have $750 into my dolly after purchasing it used and installing new tires and a rim. I also had to buy a mega-drop hitch insert so that the dolly sits level behind my F350 tow vehicle.

I like that you don't have to register it as a trailer and pay the registration 'fee', but there are times I'd love to have a car hauler. Hope this helps - Steve

cbmontgo
03-29-2011, 01:20 PM
I have towed my '40 behind a dolly, as well as many other vehicles. For that long a trip, I'd remove the rear driveshaft, for the sake of your xfer case, transmission, etc. Also, I have found that you need to check/tighten the wheel straps at least 3 times, and more if it rains (they stretch when wet). I have an 'American Tow Dolly' (sold new out of Fort Morgan, CO, for $1120) and my only problem with it is that it doesn't swivel very easily, and this makes the towed vehicle bind and then 'pop' when you go around corners. Very annoying, and it can loosen the straps due to the shock. This dolly is very wide, which is good and overall gets the job done. Newer versions of this dolly have plastic slipper shims to prevent the binding, supposedly.

Just be aware that you get what you pay for, some dollies are very light-duty junk, and most need tires (and 14" heavy duty tires are hard to find and expensive). I have $750 into my dolly after purchasing it used and installing new tires and a rim. I also had to buy a mega-drop hitch insert so that the dolly sits level behind my F350 tow vehicle.

I like that you don't have to register it as a trailer and pay the registration 'fee', but there are times I'd love to have a car hauler. Hope this helps - Steve

Definitely helps. Thanks...

Corbet
03-29-2011, 02:45 PM
I've never towed a 40 with a dolly but flat towed a few times. No big deal there IMO. Snow sucks but not much threat of that again this spring. I thinks its more about your tow vehicle in either case being able to stop the weight.

I took it pretty slow coming down Wolf Creek in the 80/40 combo fully loaded while moving down here. But I rolled right along at 75MPH on the flats. 40 tracked just fine.

cbmontgo
03-29-2011, 05:01 PM
I will be towing it with my full-size GMC Sierra, so I think that I should be good as far as tow vehicle size and wheelbase goes.

I checked Uhaul today, and their rates actually look pretty good for dollies. I may give this a shot. Thinking mid-May. Not sure that my stock rig is fit for CM 2011, so I may go on a quieter weekend.

baileyfj40
03-29-2011, 06:03 PM
1/2 or 3/4 ton, the 3/4 will have better brakes.

RockRunner
03-29-2011, 07:56 PM
1/2 or 3/4 ton, the 3/4 will have better brakes.

He is right. with the weight of the rig dolly and your gear you will be pushing the max of a 1/2 ton nearly. Biggest issue is snow, trying to stop on a slick road can bring the rear around real easy. Just take it easy and you will be fine.

PS also take it easy on your tranny if it is a 1/2 ton.

cbmontgo
03-29-2011, 08:17 PM
It is indeed a 1/2 ton (2004 Z71 Sierra). I am heading out in May most likely, so I hope the snow has passed by then.

I think my truck has about a 9K towing capacity. This shouldn't be too hard on the transmission, should it? I am thinking 3,500 lbs stock FJ40 (no top) + 750 lbs tow dolly + 1500 lbs fuel, gear, and passengers.

Inukshuk
03-29-2011, 09:45 PM
Not sure that my stock rig is fit for CM 2011

Stock rigs are awesome at Cruise Moab. Did you see the recent clip where a guy did Hells Revenge in a Chevy Caprice? Stock is the best way to learn wheeling and puts all of us point-and-shoot types to shame.

But, I think registration may be full already.

RockRunner
03-30-2011, 08:13 AM
It is indeed a 1/2 ton (2004 Z71 Sierra). I am heading out in May most likely, so I hope the snow has passed by then.

I think my truck has about a 9K towing capacity. This shouldn't be too hard on the transmission, should it? I am thinking 3,500 lbs stock FJ40 (no top) + 750 lbs tow dolly + 1500 lbs fuel, gear, and passengers.

The 9K is a lie! The only way you can tow 9K is if you use a class V hitch with an equalizer hitch. Also if you have a standard 1/2 ton you should have a 5K tow limit and 250# tongue wieght. I went through all this when I had my 1/2 ton GMC, it can be done but be careful. I towed my 4Runner on a 20' flatbed and it was scary. Brakes faded and tranny would not hold the gears coming down the hill.

I am sure your rig will do OK but be very careful on the downhills that's all. Enjoy and take lots of picture!!

cbmontgo
03-30-2011, 09:57 AM
The 9K is a lie! The only way you can tow 9K is if you use a class V hitch with an equalizer hitch. Also if you have a standard 1/2 ton you should have a 5K tow limit and 250# tongue wieght. I went through all this when I had my 1/2 ton GMC, it can be done but be careful. I towed my 4Runner on a 20' flatbed and it was scary. Brakes faded and tranny would not hold the gears coming down the hill.

I am sure your rig will do OK but be very careful on the downhills that's all. Enjoy and take lots of picture!!

That is helpful information. Now I am wishing that I had a 3/4-ton.

corsair23
03-30-2011, 11:19 AM
My suggestion based PURELY on what I've read when I researched pulling my 40 to Moab years ago with my Dodge Durango...

Avoid Uhaul if you can - look elsewhere for better equipment

Do a trial run locally - rent a dolly for the day (or borrow one) and start off with an around the neighborhood cruise and then go from there (hills and the highway)

Don't try to back up with the 40 on the dolly

x2 on stock rigs in Moab - if you can still get in on CM11 COME!! - There will be a LOT of people there to help, guide you, etc. - always better to be in a group! - I'm betting some of the "easier" trails probably still have space

MDH33
03-30-2011, 11:50 AM
You could always drive your 40 and have your fam or friends be the chase rig with all the gear, tools, etc. Driving your 40 to the trail is 1/2 the fun. ;)