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wesintl
03-31-2011, 03:51 PM
I finally caught the documentary on pbs. It sure takes a certain breed of man to live like that. He was quite a wood craftsman. Def watch it if you have never seen it. :cheers:

Perry, do you have his book?

DaveInDenver
03-31-2011, 04:00 PM
I have his book, Dick Proenneke is his name. The book is called 'One Man's Wilderness'. The guy was a heavy diesel mechanic in Alaska and basically one day just decided to homestead. He was 50 when he started the cabin at Twin Lakes. If you want to read it we can meet up at lunch tomorrow.

FWIW, a related thread: 11450

MDH33
03-31-2011, 04:28 PM
I saw it for the first time last year. pretty cool. Made me want to go try to build a cabin with an axe and a crosscut saw. :beer:

coax
03-31-2011, 05:18 PM
Yep, a great film. One tough hombre. And I think he was ~50 when he built the cabin? And his craftsmanship is pretty wild. "I think I'll build a door". :cool:

Lars
03-31-2011, 05:20 PM
It takes a special type of person do do what he did. It would be fun for a while. I don't know if I could do it as long as he did, but I like the idea.

subzali
03-31-2011, 07:00 PM
Pretty amazing, that Dick. His book was a good read (compilation of journals). I guess there's a second book that goes further into detail that my dad has read and has recommended to me; haven't gotten to that one yet.

Inukshuk
03-31-2011, 09:07 PM
I own the DVD. Family friends of mine met him in AK and corresponded with him for a few years before he passed. I will be happy to lend out the DVD. I watch it a few times a year - it never gets old. Makes me want to go out and live in the woods. Word is that he disliked all the male park rangers that they would send by, being very partial to the ladies.

Corbet
03-31-2011, 09:13 PM
Great documentary. Been while since I've seen it.

Groucho
03-31-2011, 09:20 PM
I own the DVD. Family friends of mine met him in AK and corresponded with him for a few years before he passed. I will be happy to lend out the DVD. I watch it a few times a year - it never gets old. Makes me want to go out and live in the woods. Word is that he disliked all the male park rangers that they would send by, being very partial to the ladies.

I'd love to borrow it for a weekend if I could. My folks have it and we watched it one Thanksgiving. Everyone was riveted.

JadeRunner
03-31-2011, 09:21 PM
Yea, that dudes is cool. He's livin' the life.

Inukshuk
04-01-2011, 08:20 AM
Pretty amazing, that Dick.


:eek: :lmao:


His book was a good read (compilation of journals). I guess there's a second book that goes further into detail that my dad has read and has recommended to me; haven't gotten to that one yet.

Do you have the title?

bh4rnnr
04-01-2011, 11:40 AM
I have not read this book Wes, thanks for the heads up:thumb:.

Daniel, i'll get in line after Nathaniel to watch the documentry:cheers:

:beer:

subzali
04-01-2011, 01:14 PM
Hmm. I'll have to ask my dad, maybe I was wrong about there being a second book. I found this:
http://www.dickproenneke.com/

The book I read was "One Man's Wilderness" - I liked the humor in his train of thought as he wrote his journals.

oops - this must be the one I was thinking about:
http://www.amazon.com/More-Readings-One-Mans-Wilderness/dp/0160729947/ref=pd_bxgy_b_text_b

:cheers:

Woodsman
04-02-2011, 09:10 AM
I watch this whenever it's on and think I taped it last time.

The one thing that I am reminded of each time I watch it is that, although the men and women of early America didn't have all this technology garbage bouncing around in their head, they did have plenty of other knowledge up there. As with my dad, who plowed our farm with horses when he was only 10, I've always been impressed that he's one heck of a welder, farmer, gardener, builder, mechanic/motor repairman, electrician, plumber, concrete/brick mason and the list goes on.

Really, Dick's knowledge base is similar to that which allowed many rural American's to live that way into the mid-20th century (example our farm, though in the family since 1839, did not get electric until after WWII.

TIMZTOY
04-03-2011, 05:57 PM
id like to borrow it also when it get around.. or somone should just copy it and bring the copys to the meeting. id be willing to copy it if no one else wants to.

WyoCruiser
04-04-2011, 12:18 PM
Thanks for introducing me to him.

Some more background info.: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Proenneke

wesintl
04-04-2011, 01:31 PM
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Hulk
04-04-2011, 07:54 PM
I'd like to borrow the DVD when you have it available, Daniel.

Inukshuk
04-04-2011, 10:05 PM
I'll bring the DVD Wednesday to loan out. Its still available for purchase and copyrighted, so no copying.

Some of you met my "2nd dad" Steve on the Outlaws run years ago. He built a log cabin on the land my family shared with his, and which my mom still has in upstate NY. We peeled and sawed logs, etc. When we built our cabin we used rough sawn lumber, and also no power tools since there was no electricity. Hand sawing sheets of plywood is a heck of a workout! As is hand drilling with a brace and bit.