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View Full Version : Who's got tube bender and/or notcher I could borrow?


Overlander
08-28-2011, 05:26 PM
I'm building sliders for my Cruiser. Got the driver's side done and working on the Passenger side this week. Need to put some tube rail on them so was wondering if anyone has a tube bender and/or a notcher I could borrow for a weekend?!

I'm in North Denver (Westminster)

Thx,
James

Overlander
08-31-2011, 05:16 PM
Ok - let me ask a different question: who's willing to bend some tube for me... for some beer!? :beer:

TIMZTOY
08-31-2011, 07:30 PM
what diameter ?

Overlander
08-31-2011, 11:29 PM
what diameter ?

I'll probably go with either 1.25 inch or 1.5inch, not bigger.

TIMZTOY
09-01-2011, 09:32 PM
for the notching,
*just wrap a piece of paper around the end of the tube, have the paper sticking out past the tube. (use a small piece of scrap tube for eaiser management)
*then hold the paper up to your other tube and fold in the paper that would wrap "fish mouth", mark the paper with a sharpie.
*then take the paper off the scrap tube..
*cut along the sharpie lines of the paper and repeat.
*keep doing this with the paper untill its perfect..
*then transfer the paper to the actual tube and draw fishmouth and cut with a angle grinder..

i did a notch with out doing this (on my sliders, sharp angle) and it took for ever, a good 30 min.. then i learned about this method and did it to my other silder and it only took about 5 min... cutting with cutoff wheel, and smoothed with flap wheel .. it looked perfect.

Overlander
09-03-2011, 10:39 PM
for the notching,
*just wrap a piece of paper around the end of the tube...
I used the technique you described as best as I could understand it.... it took me a long time (30min+), but I was happy with the result. Used the cutoff wheel, grinder and a file. Thx -

Overlander
09-04-2011, 09:41 AM
Will this bender be able to bend a 1.5inch tube (45, 90deg) - when heated, maybe?!

http://denver.craigslist.org/tls/2571165190.html

Rezarf
09-04-2011, 11:08 AM
Those dies are setup for pipe not tubing, they will be different sizes. The OD size is different for tube verses pipe. Same with the bottle jack benders you see at harbor Frieght and other places.

That said, if you use sch 40 pipe then you'd be good to go.

Uncle Ben
09-04-2011, 11:42 AM
Biggest issue between tube and pipe is how it's sized. Tube is sized by outside diameter and pipe is sized by inside diameter.

Overlander
09-06-2011, 05:14 PM
Those dies are setup for pipe not tubing, they will be different sizes.
Sorry... what's the difference between a pipe and a tube?! :rolleyes:

Overlander
09-06-2011, 05:15 PM
That said, if you use sch 40 pipe then you'd be good to go.

Does that include a black gas pipe from HD?! Would that work in a pinch for my sliders?!

TIMZTOY
09-06-2011, 07:36 PM
I used the technique you described as best as I could understand it.... it took me a long time (30min+), but I was happy with the result. Used the cutoff wheel, grinder and a file. Thx -

no problem dude, id say 30min is a desent time for the first notch with this method. the more you do it the eaiser it gets.

Rezarf
09-06-2011, 11:18 PM
Does that include a black gas pipe from HD?! Would that work in a pinch for my sliders?!

Yes it does.

Pipe is measured on its inner diameter, and tubing is measured by its outside diameter. So a 2" pipe and a 2" section of tube are acutally different sizes... so if you try to bend tube in a pipe bender its gonna kink up on you or flatten out, and vice-a-versa if you drop a pipe in a tube bending die (chances are it won't fit for said reasons).

A chop saw makes quick work of fishmouthing the tube, but I have fit a lot of tube with a 4" grinder and it works just fine... just a little slower.

Post up pics when you are done! :D

Overlander
09-07-2011, 07:11 PM
Ok - thanks for the explanation.

Back to the same question, is this bender here sturdy enough to bend a Schedule 40 black pipe?!
http://denver.craigslist.org/tls/2571165190.html

Rezarf
09-07-2011, 10:56 PM
Sorry I have never used one like that, so I can't say. I have used the hydraulic pipe benders with so-so results.

TIMZTOY
09-08-2011, 08:59 AM
isnt the sch40 plastic ?

Uncle Ben
09-08-2011, 09:20 AM
isnt the sch40 plastic ?

"Schedule" is actually a term that relates to a thickness of pipe. The 40 is the index of the schedule. So basically since pipe is designed to flow material rather than be structural the ratings specify burst strength and flow characteristics. So to answer your question, no. Schedule40 pipe can be any material that meets the specification.

Toyoland66
09-08-2011, 01:42 PM
That bender will not bend tube, it is made for bending flat strap. The dies are not radiused for tube.

Buy some real tube from a steel supplier and dont mess with gas pipe. It may be cheap but how much is your time worth? Use quality materials and end up with a quality product.

I have a air over hydro JD2 but it is at my friends shop, I have 1.5" and 1.75" dies for it. I have a lot going on right now so not sure how soon I could help you out, how big a hurry are you in?

Overlander
09-09-2011, 09:44 PM
I have a air over hydro JD2 but it is at my friends shop, I have 1.5" and 1.75" dies for it. I have a lot going on right now so not sure how soon I could help you out, how big a hurry are you in?

Not that big of a hurry... I have plenty going on too for the next two, three weeks anyway.

Overlander
10-10-2011, 02:22 PM
Thought I would ask once again about the bender - my sliders are ready, just need the tube now to finish it all off and be ready to go.

Overlander
10-20-2011, 11:14 AM
I went an picked up a HF pipe bender from a friend... this will probably work but it wants to make bends in the middle of the tube, not at the end of it - trouble.

Anybody think the muffler place could bend couple tubes for me for a small charge?

Uncle Ben
10-20-2011, 11:46 AM
I went an picked up a HF pipe bender from a friend... this will probably work but it wants to make bends in the middle of the tube, not at the end of it - trouble.

Anybody think the muffler place could bend couple tubes for me for a small charge?

No, muffler shops cannot bend structural tubing. What tube/pipe are you working with? There is a few of us that might be able to help you with a couple bends up north.

Overlander
10-20-2011, 01:52 PM
No, muffler shops cannot bend structural tubing. What tube/pipe are you working with? There is a few of us that might be able to help you with a couple bends up north.

I think I have 1 1/4'' tube ready to go... THank Kevin and let me know - I'm in Westminster (112th and Federal).

Thx,
James

Uncle Ben
10-20-2011, 02:51 PM
I think I have 1 1/4'' tube ready to go... THank Kevin and let me know - I'm in Westminster (112th and Federal).

Thx,
James

1.25 OD or ID ? The smallest tube die I have is 1.5" OD (that would be 1.25 ID if it's .120 wall tube)

Overlander
10-20-2011, 03:54 PM
1.25 OD or ID ? The smallest tube die I have is 1.5" OD (that would be 1.25 ID if it's .120 wall tube)

Dang it - mine is a 1 inch OD tube... thanks anyway, Uncle.

Uncle Ben
10-20-2011, 04:00 PM
Dang it - mine is a 1 inch OD tube... thanks anyway, Uncle.

Sorry! I have a 1"OD square tube die but that will probably make your round tube kinda funky looking! :lmao:

Overlander
10-20-2011, 04:04 PM
Sorry! I have a 1"OD square tube die but that will probably make your round tube kinda funky looking! :lmao:

Heheh - yeah... thx, we'll go with what we've got. :cheers:

subzali
10-21-2011, 08:32 AM
Just a clarification on pipe vs. tube, since I work with this stuff all the time :D

Pipe sizes are controlled by the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME). The document ASME B36.10 dictates the sizes and schedules of wrought steel pipe. Pipe is OD controlled. For example, all 2" pipe has a 2.375" OD. The variations in wall thickness end up changing the ID of the pipe.

ASME B36.19 dictates the sizes and schedules of stainless steel pipe, which in some cases is different than wrought steel pipe.

Plastic pipe is interesting. The American Water Works Association (AWWA) puts out a standard (C900) that has dimensions of some different sizes of PVC pipe. However, most of the PVC pipe you buy down at the store has the same OD as steel pipe. And even though PVC pipe is available in Schedules 40 and 80, the wall thickness of these schedules do not necessarily match the schedules of the same size steel pipe. Cole-Parmer and other manufacturers need to be referenced to determine schedule thicknesses and working pressures for their PVC pipe.

Tubing is interesting as well. Tubing is also OD controlled, but the difference is that, for example, a 2" tube has a 2" OD, not a 2.375" OD like pipe. The wall thicknesses that are available are different than what is available for pipe as well, and are generally on the thinner side. The American Society of Testing and Materials (ASTM) has a standard (A450) that dictates how tubing is to be manufactured.

Rezarf
10-21-2011, 01:58 PM
Just a clarification on pipe vs. tube, since I work with this stuff all the time :D

Pipe sizes are controlled by the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME). The document ASME B36.10 dictates the sizes and schedules of wrought steel pipe. Pipe is OD controlled. For example, all 2" pipe has a 2.375" OD. The variations in wall thickness end up changing the ID of the pipe.

ASME B36.19 dictates the sizes and schedules of stainless steel pipe, which in some cases is different than wrought steel pipe.

Plastic pipe is interesting. The American Water Works Association (AWWA) puts out a standard (C900) that has dimensions of some different sizes of PVC pipe. However, most of the PVC pipe you buy down at the store has the same OD as steel pipe. And even though PVC pipe is available in Schedules 40 and 80, the wall thickness of these schedules do not necessarily match the schedules of the same size steel pipe. Cole-Parmer and other manufacturers need to be referenced to determine schedule thicknesses and working pressures for their PVC pipe.

Tubing is interesting as well. Tubing is also OD controlled, but the difference is that, for example, a 2" tube has a 2" OD, not a 2.375" OD like pipe. The wall thicknesses that are available are different than what is available for pipe as well, and are generally on the thinner side. The American Society of Testing and Materials (ASTM) has a standard (A450) that dictates how tubing is to be manufactured.

Thats some good info Matt! I learned some stuff.