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DaveInDenver
10-09-2011, 03:39 PM
There's an opening right now (9OCT2011 2135Z) to a repeater at 29.620MHz, KQ2H, in Sullivan County, New York. It's -100KHz offset, 146.2Hz tone. Part of New York state's linked repeaters. Anyone with 10m give it try, a few stations from CO, NM, TX, AZ getting in.

Bruce Miller
10-11-2011, 06:05 PM
10 meters is open world wide. I just worked T32C Eastern Kiribati (Christmas Island). The guy was calling CQ. A dipole on 10 meters is 16 1/2 feet long. Of all the people who Nathaniel helped get their ticket, isn't there just one person out there desiring to talk to people all over the world?

Japan is booming in, too. 4:00PM Mountain Time Tuesday is 8:00AM in Tokyo Wednesday.

DaveInDenver
10-11-2011, 10:38 PM
Not to mention, just re-tune an old CB antenna, 10m is slightly higher frequency than CB so you can trim off length and make it work. All Techs get privileges in a small segment of 10m on 28.300-28.500MHz up to 200W and soon 6m will work well, everyone gets to use that. The repeater I worked into New York would be for General, Extra or Advanced. So upgrade!

rover67
10-12-2011, 07:57 AM
You make a good point Bruce, I need to get into High frequency.

Rezarf
10-12-2011, 08:37 AM
10 meters is open world wide. I just worked T32C Eastern Kiribati (Christmas Island). The guy was calling CQ. A dipole on 10 meters is 16 1/2 feet long. Of all the people who Nathaniel helped get their ticket, isn't there just one person out there desiring to talk to people all over the world?

Japan is booming in, too. 4:00PM Mountain Time Tuesday is 8:00AM in Tokyo Wednesday.

Bruce, do most folks speak in English? Just curious.

DaveInDenver
10-12-2011, 08:55 AM
Bruce, do most folks speak in English? Just curious.
A lot hams speak at least some English. If it's a regular DX call sign exchange contact NATO/ITU phonetics will be almost always be used and it won't matter. If the other station responds to or calls a English CQ the QSO will probably be in English.

CO Hunter
10-12-2011, 04:51 PM
For me it's not a lack of interest rather a lack of equipment.

Bruce Miller
10-13-2011, 07:36 AM
Almost all of the radio operators world wide speak English when on the air. In my opinion, it's because most foreign radio ops are professional people, doctors, dentists, engineers, probably educated in either the U.K. or the U.S. Also, most foreign schools make learning English a requirement for graduation.

rhyary
10-25-2011, 01:17 PM
Hi,
I am trying to make 10M work but I have yet to have a successful QSO.

Bruce Miller
10-26-2011, 09:52 AM
The earth was hit by an intense geomagnetic storm on Oct. 24th and 25th and that had an negative impact on HF radio and other communications systems. Here's a link to an interesting article about the storm:

http://spaceweather.com/

10 meters should be one of the easiest bands to work DX, requiring a relatively small antenna and low power. Watch the DX clusters or listen for beacons to indicate when the band opens up. Still, stateside radio contacts should be very doable on 10. Keep trying. Is your antenna your mobile?

rhyary
10-28-2011, 07:36 AM
Did great today. On the way to work QSO on 10M with West England (4-7) and Pueto Rico (5-9)

About 5 -9. 5 is strength and 9 is clarity. Right?

rhyary
10-28-2011, 07:40 AM
There's an opening right now (9OCT2011 2135Z) to a repeater at 29.620MHz, KQ2H, in Sullivan County, New York.

Dave, how do I work a 10M repeater?
Same as 2M?

I would like to give it a try.

Also I heard 5-9 Colorado station on 10M straight but he was answering to a CQ and I didn't want to interfere.

I wonder if this happen, how I can reach out to the CO station even if it is not my QSO.

rhyary
10-28-2011, 08:14 AM
There is a SOTA activation by WG0AT7 today UTC 17:00 from around Colorado Spring on 14.3425, 21.270, 28.400 and 144.52.

I don't know when he will be on 10M.

Since my LX450 has the 10M hamstick on it, I will be on 28.400. If anyone wants to give it a try, I may hear you. It will be 1pm here in NY so I will be on my lunch hour, so can't do it for too long.

Bruce Miller
10-28-2011, 08:39 AM
When you receive (or give) a 5-9 report, the first number indicates readability, the second number indicates signal strength. Readability ranges from 1, unreadable, to 2, barely readable, to 3, readable with considerable difficulty, to 4, readable with practically no difficulty, to a 5, perfectly readable. The second number, signal strength, is the S meter reading from your transceiver. A 5-9 signal report is a respectable report. A stronger report would be given or received if your S meter reads over S-9. On the air, we would say "Your signal report is 5-9 plus 10."

I'll listen for you on 28.400 at 1700Z (1:00PM Eastern Time). If we do make contact, be prepared to QSY. One of the most popular contests is about to begin and the bands are very crowded and will be so until Sunday evening.

rhyary
10-28-2011, 08:42 AM
Thanks Bruce. Just looked up QSY so I know what you mean :-)

rhyary
10-28-2011, 08:54 AM
Bruce,
Why do you have two call signs?

Given your explanation the call from England was 4 - 6

I live on a ridge, and I work in the Hudson Valley. So as I drive a long the ridge I get one kind of report, and as I decend into the valley the report may change in the same QSO. Which makes it tricky to give a signal report as I am driving.

Another thing is that as I am talking to England, I can here them well 5-9 or 4-6 and then I may loose them for a 2 to 4 second. So it is not steady 4-6. will flactuate 4-6 to 2-3.

Lastly driving around in Land Cruiser makes it an ultimate QSO for me. Meaning, I am in a vehicle that can drive anywere and QSO everywhere. Now, how cool is that!

Bruce Miller
10-28-2011, 08:57 AM
Congrats on the two QSO's, the UK (G) and Puerto Rico (KP4), by the way.

Regarding a schedule today on 28.400, you call me. If that frequency is busy and you have to QSY, stay close to 28.400, say 28.395-28.405.

Don't forget your radio manners, too. Before making your call, ask if the frequency is busy. You would say, "QRZed, is this frequency busy?" Then listen. Then repeat, then listen. If nothing is heard, then call me three times then give your call. Then listen. Then repeat until we connect.

See you later.

rhyary
10-28-2011, 09:08 AM
Got it. I will be calling you.

Bruce Miller
10-28-2011, 09:39 AM
Why two call signs? Back in the '80's, I got a reciprocal call sign while visiting the Cayman Islands, ZF. I've held on to that call over the years so I can operate there any time I visit.

OK on changing signal strength as you drive high on the ridge or down in the valley. Remember, the better antenna is one with the most aluminum up as high as you can get it. Your signal reports are going to be best when you and your LC are on the ridge. That rule holds true with 2 meters and CB, too.

DaveInDenver
10-28-2011, 09:40 AM
Bruce,
Why do you have two call signs?
Bruce has a callsign from another country, in this case the Cayman Islands. Our FCC has reciprocity agreements with many other countries' radio spectrum management bodies. If you were to travel to these countries and want to operate you get a callsign to use there. The actual process varies depending on the type of agreement. The exception to this is Canada, you have automatic equivalent privileges and just use your US callsign followed by stroke-VE3 (/VE3). All others you have to get a local callsign.
Another thing is that as I am talking to England, I can here them well 5-9 or 4-6 and then I may loose them for a 2 to 4 second. So it is not steady 4-6. will flactuate 4-6 to 2-3.
RST (just R and S for phone) is largely subjective. Obviously readability for one person is different than another.

The strength to me is also relative because all S-meters are not calibrated and the level is very affected by the receiving station. For example running with your RX pre-amp adds a couple of S-units to the indicated strength or using a beam instead of a vertical will push a stronger strength down the feedline to your radio. Two identical radios and antennas can get different signal strength based on feedline type (coax or twinlead) and quality even.

If the signal is very strong, S9 and higher, it will usually not matter if the pre-amp is on or off, the radio's AGC will roll back to compensate for the added gain. So pre-amp on/off really only affects mid scale. The +whatever is number of decibels over S9, so S9+20 is 20dB over S9. S9 is understood to be 50uV signal strength, so +10dB over would be about 150uV at your receiver, +20, +40, goes up. At S9+60 you are 60dB over 50uV, which is around 50mV.

The fluctuation is fading. Very typical for HF propagation, particularly with verticals and dipoles. Sometimes your path is strong and does not vary much, other times the path comes and goes in minutes. That happens a lot with 6m and 10m during solar cycle transitions, the band will open and close in minutes. The RS report I send on my QSL card is based on the initial contact.

DaveInDenver
10-28-2011, 09:55 AM
Dave, how do I work a 10M repeater?
Same as 2M?
Yes, they are FM, use an offset and maybe a tone squelch. Remember that your 100W (or 200W in your case) radio is designed for 100/200 watts intermittently on SSB or CW. When you use FM, AM or some digital modes like PSK31 and JT65 the duty cycle is much higher, so if your radio does not do it automatically you should roll back the power. I run about 40W max AM or FM with my 100W xcvr. The total power envelope in a 40W FM signal is a lot higher than a 100W SSB and it's the envelope that produces the equivalent heating in your radio and draw from the power supply.

DaveInDenver
10-28-2011, 11:00 AM
There is a SOTA activation by WG0AT7 today UTC 17:00 from around Colorado Spring on 14.3425, 21.270, 28.400 and 144.52.
Steve usually operates CW, although these sound as though he's doing phone or maybe being /7 it's an APRS thing. Did you hear him?

Bruce Miller
10-28-2011, 11:20 AM
FB QSO, Rami. Armchair copy all the way. Did you hear the ZS6 station that called me after our QSO? Gud DX. Yes, let's get on 17 and 20 meters, too. Let me know the time and frequency. 17 meters will be less QRM as there is no contesting on the WARC bands.

CU,

Bruce

rhyary
10-28-2011, 12:00 PM
Hi Bruce. That was great!
I can't believe how good the transmission was.
I heard faint QSOs on the freq, but nothing as clear as our QSO.
On the way back to work, I had a nice QSO with a MM0TFU from Scottland.
I'll toast one Glenfiddich tonight.

Dave,
I didn't know he will be on CW. I am not there yet :-)

CardinalFJ60
10-28-2011, 03:22 PM
I've got a quad band radio/antenna setup. IIRC I can only TX on 28-28.5 correct? are there repeaters, too?

I'll throw that antenna on for the ride home tonight - scanning 28-28.5

Does anyone have a favorite 10m freq they typically TxRX on?

DaveInDenver
10-28-2011, 04:00 PM
I've got a quad band radio/antenna setup. IIRC I can only TX on 28-28.5 correct? are there repeaters, too?

I'll throw that antenna on for the ride home tonight - scanning 28-28.5

Does anyone have a favorite 10m freq they typically TxRX on?
Technician holders have full privileges on 6m and higher. On 10m you can use 28.000-28.300, which is RTTY/data and 28.301-28.500, which is phone. A lot of hams seem to call on 28.400 USB, although I'm not sure it's an ARRL recommended calling frequency. The 10m band plans have the FM repeaters up in 29.510-29.690.

Bruce Miller
10-29-2011, 11:42 AM
One of the most important skills an amateur radio operator can/must develop is to listen. Somewhere on the band, someone is calling CQ. Get into the habit of listening for that station, calling CQ yourself only when you're sure there's nobody out there calling CQ. 10 meters is an awesome band. Listen in the 28.300 to 28.500 portion of the band although 28.495 is the DX calling frequency. I would stay away from that spot as it's usually very busy. Also, until Sunday around supper time, there's a very big world wide contest on, 10 meters included. The band will be busy but that could be a good thing if you understand how to operate in a contest. Get on the air. You'll get the hang of it. Once you make contact with a station, be prepared to give a signal report, your name, and your QTH (location), and your call sign suffix should include "mobile" if you are. Let us know who you talk to.

xodeuce
11-07-2011, 04:04 PM
It was open again this morning. Around 9:30AM CST I had no trouble working a station in Ireland (EI8BLB) via mobile on the way to a meeting. I heard a bunch of pile ups trying to work stations in Western Europe.

DaveInDenver
11-07-2011, 04:46 PM
Very nice. Worked a handful of Japanese stations Saturday evening about 2200Z using JT65A on 28.076. I was using 15 watts into my vertical and they were around 15W~25W depending on antenna, dipole, 2-el, etc. Also worked a station in British Columbia on 28.076.

xodeuce
11-07-2011, 08:28 PM
Cool, Dave. I need to check out some of the 10m repeaters when the conditions are good. I was on 10m sideband. Just got the radio in the truck this past weekend, and I was so pumped to actually be talking to someone that far away that I didn't note the frequency. RST was probably 3x4 or 3x5, and was a little tough to copy, but we did exchange and acknowledge call signs correctly with phonetics. I also talked to a guy in Belgium on 20m on the way to lunch and got a 5x7 received report, and he was 5x5-5x7. All in all it was pretty fun on day one :)