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gr8fulabe
11-19-2011, 11:55 AM
So, the, "Club Workshop" mentioned in this thread:

http://www.risingsun4x4club.org/forum2/showthread.php?t=9577&highlight=shop+class

offers welding classes on site. Anyone ever take any? Does anyone think this is the best way to learn how to weld, on the cheap & without a 6 month university type of class? Or, is it not worth it?

I've wanted to learn to weld for years, and I even have a little 110 gas shielded welder that I bought on the cheap, used years ago & have never turned on, becuase I don't know how to use it.

Anyone happen to have any insights or opinions?
Thanks,
abe

MDH33
11-19-2011, 12:04 PM
I would like to get some pointers as well. Maybe we could organize something within the club? There are a lot of skilled welders in our midst. If some folks volunteered their gear and shop for a weekend, maybe we could host an informal "tech day" and learn something. I bet the club could even reimburse the host for their time, consumables and pizzas, etc. Just a thought.

J Kimmel
11-19-2011, 01:22 PM
general air has 1/2 day classes they offer on all types and levels. I took a gas/arc class years ago so I suppose thats where I got the basics but the rest is simply turn on your welder and start sticking metal together :)

thats pretty much it, I can tell the difference between recent stuff on my truck on some of the first things :)

nattybumppo
11-19-2011, 03:40 PM
I would like to get some pointers as well. Maybe we could organize something within the club? There are a lot of skilled welders in our midst. If some folks volunteered their gear and shop for a weekend, maybe we could host an informal "tech day" and learn something. I bet the club could even reimburse the host for their time, consumables and pizzas, etc. Just a thought.

I would also attend something like this. I am itching, no make that burning, for a welder.

frontrange
11-19-2011, 05:28 PM
general air has 1/2 day classes they offer on all types and levels. I took a gas/arc class years ago so I suppose thats where I got the basics but the rest is simply turn on your welder and start sticking metal together :)

thats pretty much it, I can tell the difference between recent stuff on my truck on some of the first things :)

Ditto. I spent $50 on one of the classes in Denver to try AL Mig before investing in a spool gun. Turns out it a hell of a lot easier and faster than TIG on aluminum so I decided it was worth the investment.

Beater
11-19-2011, 06:35 PM
emily griffith as well

art hog
11-19-2011, 07:48 PM
Ditto. I spent $50 on one of the classes in Denver to try AL Mig before investing in a spool gun. Turns out it a hell of a lot easier and faster than TIG on aluminum so I decided it was worth the investment.

Their classes are designed more for trying out equipment not so much for learning to weld. Id like to try a spool gun for aluminum. What powers the spool gun?

frontrange
11-19-2011, 09:11 PM
Their classes are designed more for trying out equipment not so much for learning to weld. Id like to try a spool gun for aluminum. What powers the spool gun?

No, not at all. The first couple of hours were classroom theory. The end of the class you go in back and pick the machines and the process you want to practice on. I got value out of both parts of the class.

The spool gun has a drive system that can be powered off of 115VAC, or a DC supply from the welder depending on which model spool gun you buy. The welding current of course comes from a CV welding supply.

art hog
11-19-2011, 09:32 PM
[QUOTE=frontrange;196845]No, not at all. The first couple of hours were classroom theory. The end of the class you go in back and pick the machines and the process you want to practice on. I got value out of both parts of the class.

I have taken the classes there. It is in MY opinion, that they are not worth $50 unless you are trying out equipment. I have several hundred hour of weld schooling. it was not worth the time for me. For the purpose of this thread, if you just want to learn to weld on your truck, learn from a friend and practice. If you want to be a welder, go to the school that John listed. This is just MY opinion

frontrange
11-20-2011, 07:29 AM
Since the original poster like most of the rest of us hasn't taken several hundred hours of weld schooling, a couple of hours of instruction by a professional before sticking things together is time and money well spent in my opinion.

If you've had hundreds of hours of professional instruction, what did you expect to get out of a 4 hour, $50 class?

Corbet
11-20-2011, 08:39 AM
I took a continuing education class in SLC offered by the public school district. It was a night class at one of the high schools. Is there anything like that in Denver?

For $90 I got 8 weeks once a week to learn and practice with Stick/MIG/Oxy Acetylene.

art hog
11-20-2011, 12:07 PM
Since the original poster like most of the rest of us hasn't taken several hundred hours of weld schooling, a couple of hours of instruction by a professional before sticking things together is time and money well spent in my opinion.

If you've had hundreds of hours of professional instruction, what did you expect to get out of a 4 hour, $50 class?

I got the class for free with the purchase of my tig welder. I did not expect much from a 4 hour class. But, I feel that you can spend your money better. buy some welding wire and gas, if you use it and learn to use the welder you have and not on the cool stuff they have. I did take a plasma cutting class there, Again FREE with purchase of equipment. I had no knowledge of the process. In the end, I was glad the class was free.

J Kimmel
11-20-2011, 12:14 PM
I got the class for free with the purchase of my tig welder. I did not expect much from a 4 hour class. But, I feel that you can spend your money better. buy some welding wire and gas, if you use it and learn to use the welder you have and not on the cool stuff they have. I did take a plasma cutting class there, Again FREE with purchase of equipment. I had no knowledge of the process. In the end, I was glad the class was free.

yes but did you pick enough from the free class to go back and figure out the rest in your garage?

Thats my point. If you have no idea what to do, take a 4 hour class, it should arm you just enough to head home and start sticking metal together :)

art hog
11-20-2011, 01:44 PM
I took a continuing education class in SLC offered by the public school district. It was a night class at one of the high schools. Is there anything like that in Denver?

For $90 I got 8 weeks once a week to learn and practice with Stick/MIG/Oxy Acetylene.

This is similar to what I took in San Diego, But it was 4 days a week 5 hours a day for an entire semester. It was free. You had to supply your books and safety equipment. Awesome class. It was sponsored by the nasco ship yards. I wish there was something like that here in colorado. I have herd there is a welding class at the junior collage in Gloden/lakewood. check out this link. I might be of help.
http://education-portal.com/welding_classes_denver.html

art hog
11-20-2011, 02:04 PM
yes but did you pick enough from the free class to go back and figure out the rest in your garage?

Thats my point. If you have no idea what to do, take a 4 hour class, it should arm you just enough to head home and start sticking metal together :)

Yes and no. I learned 2 things. a plasma cutter can kill you and on thin sheet metal you can put the torch right on the steel and cut. Most of what I learned was form reading on my own and asking questions.

Im not the one looking for the knowledge Im just expressing my thoughts and opinion on this thread. If you don't like what I say thats fine. Do what you want to do and have fun with it.

J Kimmel
11-20-2011, 04:54 PM
not trying to start an argument, I'm simply saying that for the novice hobby welder who wants to stick some metal together but doesn't know where to start you can find someone to teach you or you can go take a half a day class. Yes I get it the reason is so you can try out equipment and maybe buy something but you can also get just enough basic info to gain just enough confidence to go back to your garage and stick some metal together. Its like anything else, you need seat time weather you're a pro or a hobbyist. Most people also need just enough info to confidently try it on their own any maybe just maybe 50 bucks and 4 hours on a Saturday would give them that :)

One might learn enough to decide to take a full semester class at a junior college, or maybe they don't want to.

Overlander
11-21-2011, 08:17 AM
So, the, "Club Workshop" ... offers welding classes on site. Anyone ever take any?

I have taken that class along with my father-in-law about 2 years ago. I was a complete beginner and the class was very valuable. I recommend it.

You're not gonna come out of there a professional welder. If you have been welding already, don't come to this class (you already know all they are going to be covering).

For me, it gave me just enough to know how to prepare for the welding, how to setup the tools and equipment, how to be safe doing it, how to make adjustments using the controls - previously a complete mystery.

You'll have a chance to work with a nice quality welding machine, and good cutting/shaping tools along with it. You can ask questions and get immediate feedback as you run your practice beads - it's all good for those starting out. I gained enough confidence to pursue on my own - this year I bought both stick and MIG machines and have used them all summer long with decent results.

I'm not going to be a professional welder but I know how to stick two pieces of metal together and run a decent bead - that's all I need right now.

Go for it -
James

Beater
11-21-2011, 08:27 AM
Also - go to your local used book store, and pick up aws certified textbooks, used, or vintage ones for cheap. A little goes a long way. Tig is the only technology that has changed much in the last 40 years, and that is mainly on the machine side. The techniques are the same.