PDA

View Full Version : Considering buying a new Tacoma


theboomboom
02-07-2012, 01:09 PM
This is going to be a bit long-winded, but I would greatly appreciate if you took the time to read this and weigh in with your opinions.

My truck search has been going on for a few months already, and so far what I’ve found in the used truck market has been pretty discouraging :(

I’ve looked at T100’s, Tacomas, 4Runners and the like, all various years and various conditions and I have not yet found “the one”. I do not believe my discouragement is due to impatience, I am not under pressure to have a truck right now. Rather, what has been most discouraging is I’m finding that most of the time, folks have either run up the miles on these trucks, over-priced them or have hack-jobbed the poor thing nearly beyond recognition. There isn’t much out there that fits the specific criteria I’m looking for. My experience with my last truck taught me a few things about having a used vehicle as a DD, namely what it is like to always have the thoughts “will it start when I turn the key, what the heck is that new noise, and how long will it go before a breakdown?”

I’ve also observed first-hand the “Toyota tax”, and how most folks with 10-15 year old Toyotas somehow believe they are gold-plated. Not to say they aren’t, Toyota has produced a highly-demanded truck for years now, and the fact that a used Toyota truck is very resilient to depreciation (even in this economy) speaks volumes about this. (As a brief aside, I realize that part of a slow economy is demand for used vehicles increases, making today a potentially better time to get a new truck).

A solution I’ve begun to consider is what it would be like to have my own gold-plated truck, and how smart it would be (or not be) to just buy a new truck and plan on keeping it a long time. One reason I’ve had difficulty finding the right used truck is, as mentioned, I have specific criteria in mind for what I want. I want a vehicle that would be dead-reliable as a DD, economical, versatile and something that will benefit me in the (very) long-term. I think that when I am on my own, having a pickup with all the utility it inherently provides, with all sorts of situations that come up in life, would be invaluable over a period of many years. A new Tacoma meets all these criteria for me, so my big question is if now is the right time for me to make the investment.

To provide a little background about myself for those who don’t know, I’m in my Junior year of college. I don’t receive any financial assistance from the government, or my parents for educated-related expenses. I still live at home and as such am able to avoid major expenses like rent, groceries, etc. I have a scholarship that will cover my tuition and fees through the end of my 4-year program. I work part time, have for years, and believe I will have a steady job until I graduate before I need to find work again. I have a good cash reserve built up. Looking forward, I’ve already begun saving for an MBA out-of-state, and am exploring opportunities I have to minimize costs while I pursue a graduate degree just like I have for my undergrad. I think if all goes as planned, I’ll be able to work as a “TA” for the University I want to go to, which would cover my tuition, fees, and give me enough money to cover living expenses while I’m on my own. An important part of this plan, especially since I would be out-of-state, is having a vehicle that can get me there, get me back, and be something I don’t have to think about while I focus on my education.

I’ve spec’d a new Regular Cab 4x4 Tacoma, with everything I need and nothing I don’t, and found the price came in around $23k. I played around with a payment calculator, and estimate I would qualify for around 4.25% APR if I financed it over 72 months (I have been working on building an excellent credit rating ever since I got my first job). Of course, the full coverage insurance for a 21-year-old male could be a game-ender (haven’t looked into that yet, but I do have a spotless record), but this 6-year plan would keep the payments low while I’m in school and working part time. I do plan on trying to work full-time when I’m not in school, and I would be using the extra earnings to get the loan paid down. I would be able to comfortably make a 20% down payment, and still have the cash reserves to make payments for several months even if I were out of a job. I think I’ll be able to stay ahead of depreciation in this way, and even over a period of six years I would never find myself “upside down” on the loan. SHTF, I sell the thing, use the money to pay off the balance of the loan, and start fresh without damaging my credit rating.

I feel like I’m on the right track, thinking this through, but having never done this before I understand that I may not have thought of everything. Your thoughts?

wesintl
02-07-2012, 01:29 PM
hard to say. Could strap you financially. ~@280 for a car payment then what is ins for a 21 yo on a new tacoma 2-300 mo? yer nuts. How much will you have left over for eats, bs, a ring ;)

Buy a 1k beater to get you round, bank what you'd be spending on a new car and ins and in 6 years when you are working full time can afford to almost buy almost 1/2 the vehicles you want in cash. 45k you'll save in that time.

what about a down payment for a house etc in 6-10 years.

use your part time job $ to have fun, travel.. you will have the rest of your life to work and pay for a car and house.

Kids these days :rolleyes:

MDH33
02-07-2012, 01:32 PM
Hey Rick, it sounds like you've done your homework and have a good plan.

My only advice/thoughts come from first hand experience: as soon as you drive that vehicle off the lot, it loses value. If you're financing it and you get into a wreck, you stand to lose a lot of money. If you pay the vehicle off and never wreck it, then you stand to recoup some of your investment down the road, maybe.

Also, upkeep, repairs and insurance on a new vehicle sometimes outweigh maintenance on an older, used vehicle that you pay cash for.

I'll be interested to hear what you decide to do. :thumb:

Edit: Wes must have been writing at the same time, so I didn't see his post until after, but he has some really good points too! Plenty of time to be in debt later.

Red_Chili
02-07-2012, 01:34 PM
Sounds like you are decades beyond your years in financial thinking. Goodonya.

One thought, I have probably bought my last new vehicle because I simply cannot make a value proposition for one make sense (not to mention, better to put money toward an investment, which a vehicle will NEVER be). Even new vehicles can be a worry, that is never a done deal. Certified used seems to make the most financial sense, and provide the best value along with security, at least IMHO.

You drive a new vehicle off the lot, you just kissed away thousands instantly. You buy a good well researched and dickered used vehicle off the lot, and it is worth what you paid for. Hard to argue with.

DaveInDenver
02-07-2012, 01:35 PM
You're a smart kid, you know what's right in the back of your mind. I'll add a few thoughts, though.

First, set a budget, a firm budget. It can have a little cushion but it needs to be basically rock solid. If you can honestly pull $23K, then buy the best fit at $23K and hold to it. It's very easy to rational yourself over your head.

I would never finance a truck I could not afford. I'd pay cash or have the cash available to pay it off. Taking a loan at very low rates might be a tactic I'd use to manage cash flow. When we are forced to replace an appliance, we might do the 12 months same as cash and let the money sit until 11 months and 28 days rather than writing a check. Even an insulting 0.2% interest on $1,000 in savings is $20. But other than our mortgage I've never been able to take on a loan where I pay someone interest because I was too lazy, impulsive or undisciplined to save the money myself.

Planning to sell it should you hit a tough spot is a sure sign IMVHO that you cannot afford the truck. What happens if the situation you find yourself in is because of a tough job market (like that ever happens...) and there is no market for a lightly used truck?

Another point, a regular cab base Tacoma will not hold its value, so don't expect your 'gold' truck to necessarily be the same as the Tacomas you're looking at used. They are almost definitely XtraCabs and that is a major valuation holder. Personally I'd (like your thinking) buy the most base 2.7L 5-speed XtraCab (er, Access Cab) 4x4 if I was in the market, but that is because I buy and hold trucks for decades.

rover67
02-07-2012, 01:47 PM
hard to say. Could strap you financially. ~@280 for a car payment then what is ins for a 21 yo on a new tacoma 2-300 mo? yer nuts. How much will you have left over for eats, bs, a ring ;)

Buy a 1k beater to get you round, bank what you'd be spending on a new car and ins and in 6 years when you are working full time can afford to almost buy almost 1/2 the vehicles you want in cash. 45k you'll save in that time.

what about a down payment for a house etc in 6-10 years.

use your part time job $ to have fun, travel.. you will have the rest of your life to work and pay for a car and house.

Kids these days :rolleyes:

I echo Wes' comments. you can find something reliable and cheaper than a new truck.

whatever you end up getting and especially if you get a new truck, get good complete insurance and KNOW YOUR POLICY. It sucks when you loose a 23k truck and get nothing for it. Trust me, it hurts.

subzali
02-07-2012, 01:49 PM
Sounds good until you meet a girl and then all the sudden a regular cab truck isn't big enough :eek:

I wouldn't do it. I hated being in debt with my truck and some other things. I know it's a hard place finding a balance between something that will be used and cheaper (and maybe not as reliable) and something that is new and more expensive (but hopefully more reliable).

When SHTF it's hard to come out on top if your junk isn't paid for. And don't think that it won't happen to you. It can, and it can come at any time.

Just a thought - just because it's not Toyota doesn't mean it's not reliable. And if it's not reliable, the other side of the coin is that domestics are a lot cheaper to work on and parts are more readily available :hill:

My buddy was looking into Tacomas and last week ended up buying an extended cab 4x4 Chevy Colorado for probably 1/2 the price of an equivalent Taco. I think he'll come out way ahead in the long run.

Hulk
02-07-2012, 02:29 PM
Based on everything you have said, it sounds like you can swing the monthly payment for an entry level truck. If it comes with a decent warranty, that can save you some money on weird, unexpected repairs while you're making payments. That's a good thing. If you're headed to a college out-of-state in a few years, reliability will be key. I would say that if you're really satisfied that you've explored the used truck market thoroughly, then go for it. There is nothing quite like buying a new car -- everything works, and you're not dealing with PO repair jobs and mystery wiring.

With certain vehicles, buying new makes more sense than buying used. Jeeps are often like this because they hold their value so well. Toyota trucks may be the same. There's no sense in paying top dollar for a worn-out truck when you can get a brand new one and just enjoy it.

However...

Are you sure that you have looked at all the used trucks out there?
Have you looked out-of-state?
Have you enlisted the power of the Toyota Nut Netowrk (that's us) to help you find a clean, low mileage, reliable truck at a reasonable price?
If you put us to work, we can find great things for you.

If you have kind of set your heart on a new truck, then I say go for it. You'll love it, you'll take good care of it, you can afford it, and if the SHTF, you're not making $600/month car payments.

nakman
02-07-2012, 03:13 PM
One of my few regrets in life is I grew up too fast- meaning I went right from college to a mortgage & car payment, didn't even take a week vacation. Felt good at the time like I was getting ahead of the game, by taking 8 years to get an undergrad I'd already watched some of my peers climb the ladder a little faster, which was hard to do. But today it's also a bummer to consider I may never get to Europe, or never drive to Alaska, at least not until my kids are out of the house and who knows what kind of shape I'll be in at that point, or if I'll even be into it. We both wish we would have screwed off a little more.. but credit card payments, rent, then mortgage, then car payments.. they always made that stuff impossible.

Another vote for borrow dad's Bronco a little more, or pay cash for your next ride.

corsair23
02-07-2012, 03:38 PM
You drive a new vehicle off the lot, you just kissed away thousands instantly. You buy a good well researched and dickered used vehicle off the lot, and it is worth what you paid for. Hard to argue with.

I agree with Bill? :eek: :lmao:

Seriously though. Not having looked, I don't know if used Tacomas are holding more of their value than the hit you'd take buying new and just driving it off the lot? I know everything seems stable now but how about 2-3 years out when you've paid down enough of the new loan so that the truck value vs. balance owed is about equal? If you were to buy new today and in 6 months something happens where you can no longer afford the truck, you could very well be under water on the truck even with 20% down.

I know when we were looking at used Sequoias I couldn't believe that 3 year old rigs with 60K miles were still commanding up to $40K :rolleyes:

I also agree about limiting yourself to Toyotas, and a truck. IMHO a 2 door truck anymore isn't all that practical. Not long term...

And do you really need a truck now? Sure, they offer some versatility but how often will you really need that utility? You can always rent a truck for a day, or two, or a week.

Hard to argue also with those saying to hold off as well...I understand the wanting and needing something reliable argument though for sure...Peace of mind is definitely worth something...In the end I'd still look for something CPO with a nice warranty.

Another option is to lease? I've never been a fan of leases but if your long term goal is to own the vehicle, it can be a way to keep the payments down for now...Of course in the long run you'll end up paying a lot more for the vehicle. I leased my Durango way back when and it worked out well for me in the long run. It was the only way I could afford the truck and as it worked out, when the lease was up there was a glut of Durangos on the market and the leasing company did NOT want my Durango back :) - I was able to negotiate a lot off the residual price, somwhere north of $5K as I recall.

Beater
02-07-2012, 03:48 PM
yep - mooch off of dad.

j

Cheeseman
02-07-2012, 05:33 PM
I'd say the only guarantee you have is your scholarship. And knowing how you are able to commit yourself to your path in life is your other guarantee. Now that being said I side with Nakman. You know how to work on vehicles and you are now debt free. Those are two skills that many people in this current world wish they had. If you don't play now while you can you will lose the opportunity. Please don't get sucked into the ring just yet as some have referenced. New vs. used. I know the emotional end of this question. The financial end has to take over at this period in your life. But after all is said and done a clean and well kept ride no matter what flavor it is will always get you a date.

farnhamstj
02-07-2012, 08:32 PM
My wife and I bought a new 2002 Tacoma ext cab. Year later had a baby, then 16 months later another baby. Traded the tacoma and $1000 for a used 1998 100series. I estimate it cost me $8000 to drive that new truck for almost 3 years. :dunno:

What I do know is a pick-up truck + babies do not = happy wife

nakman
02-07-2012, 09:30 PM
My wife and I bought a new 2002 Tacoma ext cab. Year later had a baby, then 16 months later another baby. Traded the tacoma and $1000 for a used 1998 100series. I estimate it cost me $8000 to drive that new truck for almost 3 years. :dunno:

What I do know is a pick-up truck + babies do not = happy wife

It can be done in a DC, but it's still tight, IMO. I made our 2001 work by removing the seat back, that gave me another 4" to shove those seats back so I could get mine back to where I wanted it. Was still snug though, especially that first year with rear facing.

But when you bring kids into it, there's really no substitute for the wagon- being able to toss jackets over the back seat is just a part of life. :)

farnhamstj
02-07-2012, 09:43 PM
Tim, remember the fold the seat forward, slide the seat forward, load child seat, slide seat back to engage backrest, slide seat forward so as to adjust backrest to comfortable angle? That looks like a 4 door? ours was 2.

STOP KICKING MY SEAT!!!! (see first picture)

rover67
02-07-2012, 09:44 PM
I don't think Rick is thinking baby's...... at least I don't think so.

:D

matter of fact, a used rx7 with a v8 swap would be fun.. have you thought about that? you could throw it together for less than 3k. It'd last as long as you could keep the rear tires on it...

RockRunner
02-07-2012, 10:42 PM
IF you do buy new and depending on your down payment make sure to get GAP insurance. If you total your truck right of the lot the insurance will pay the difference between your pay off and what your truck is worth. A good thing to have when you get a loan longer than 4 years for the most part.

I do agree with Nak, take time travel and enjoy. I did it and would not trade those years and experiences for anything. Buy used and enjoy life!!!

theboomboom
02-07-2012, 10:48 PM
I don't think Rick is thinking baby's...... at least I don't think so.

:D

matter of fact, a used rx7 with a v8 swap would be fun.. have you thought about that? you could throw it together for less than 3k. It'd last as long as you could keep the rear tires on it...

Hahaha, let's just say that's not one of the life events I will be encountering in the short term. A souped up rx7... I won't even go there :flop:

Thank you to all who have weighed in so far. The starting a family topic that has been brought up is just the kind of insight I really do appreciate from you all who have been there and done that already.

Sure, I would like to start a family someday and having the right vehicle at that time is an important consideration I've given some thought to in the back of my head. If I were in that position right now, I'd be pretty set on a new Expedition, and this regular-cab pickup stuff wouldn't even be an option on the table.

Anywho...

I guess I did leave out something pretty important when I was talking about myself and my life right now.

https://fbcdn-sphotos-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-ash4/297918_2183234215227_1078110424_32376863_305038_n.jpg

Jen and I have been together over two years now. She has always been someone I can talk to about the sort of predicament I'm dealing with now. We agree that we're both too young to take our relationship to that next level, but we're comfortable talking about our lives together a few years down the road. She doesn't really know what to make of me buying a new truck right now.

I've observed many different lifestyles folks my age are living, and am always delighted to listen to more mature adults tell stories from back in the day. I have the allure for adventure, but have thus far been pretty constrained by financial uncertainty. Now that I feel confident my undergrad degree has been sorted, I'm looking forward to whats next.

https://fbcdn-sphotos-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-ash4/408865_10151155580930215_764260214_22648694_1611816387_n.jpg
https://fbcdn-sphotos-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-ash4/396833_10151155576595215_764260214_22648681_1709369792_n.jpg
https://fbcdn-sphotos-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-ash4/407130_10151155590950215_764260214_22648725_868877036_n.jpg

If I had to tell you today where I see myself in a few years, it would be pretty far north...

So when I say I need to have reliable transportation, this is what I'm preparing myself for. And I'm not quite sure I have the intestinal fortitude of Sean Jones to drive a rusty old 40 up there, he had cojones.

So starting with grad school, it would be my way up there and back. In the next chapter of my life, the truck wouldn't be a kid hauler. Rather, I'd love to have it around as another tool in the toolbox. I can remember working up at Nakman's a few summers ago, and falling in love with the location of his old house outside Evergreen. At the time, his 80 came in handy for hauling debris, firewood, and the winch up front did a great job getting those sweet-smelling pines to drop exactly where we wanted them to. That’s the kind of lifestyle and recreation I want to have someday. I’d love to have a garden, with healthy food for my family to eat and as a sustainable way to supplement the food I’m putting on their table. So I’d be loading up the bed of that truck with tools, bags of topsoil, compost, and when I’m done I’d hose the thing out. Maybe somewhere along the line, a buddy needs help moving a couch, or as a club we’re doing trailwork. I get a lot of personal gratification from just being able to help out in those types of capacities.

So here I go again, getting long-winded and probably failing to present my thoughts very coherently. Thanks again all who have weighed in. I had not yet really considered going the CPO route, but will definitely give that all some thought. And to all the members of the Toyota Nut Network, if you happen across a low-miles, baby blue, SR5, 5-speed T100 for sale, I hope I’m the first guy you call.

corsair23
02-08-2012, 01:31 AM
That picture of you "frosted" is classic :D

Not to confuse the issue more, but a small trailer could also fit the "hauling" needs just fine :hill: - cheap if you have a place to store it...In the end you'll figure out what is right for you and get 'er done :thumb:

DaveInDenver
02-08-2012, 06:31 AM
You know if I you Rick, I'd get a few year old F150 4x4 and be done with it. Should be able to find a late 10th gen (97-2003) or an early 11th gen (2004-08) in good shape without a million miles for ~$10k, particularly if you stick to the XL and regular cab.

That's all we drove as kids back when I was about your age, old Fords and Chevys. At that time it would have been late 1970s and early 1980s trucks, but we went everywhere, road trips to Utah and Oregon and Montana and Colorado. We spent summers doing construction and working in climbing and bike shops. I suppose had we grown up in Colorado we'd have driven old Toyota trucks, but in St. Louis Toyotas weren't as common.

xodeuce
02-28-2012, 08:00 PM
My wife and I bought a new 2002 Tacoma ext cab. Year later had a baby, then 16 months later another baby. Traded the tacoma and $1000 for a used 1998 100series. I estimate it cost me $8000 to drive that new truck for almost 3 years. :dunno:

What I do know is a pick-up truck + babies do not = happy wife

Even with a dub cab it's tight. The wife and I have kicked around the idea of a 100. I wish I'd had some folks like this to kick ideas around with 3 years ago when I bought mine. Lots of good info in here.

Beater
02-29-2012, 08:11 AM
My t100 extra cab is small. inside.
Dave and I are on the same page. for 2years my pickup was a 2007 chevy extra cab. THAT worked. it did everything I need it to, and then some. 22mpg highway and 350lbs of torque. 18 in the city. My t is doing well if it gets 18 in the city with a v6. Chevy Sat 5 adults in a pinch, and 5 kids plus driver no problem.

oh - and it had a locker. stock.
no clearance, and it was big, but the variable assist steering and decreasing radius turning circle made parking it a breeze.

I LOVE my toyota products, for many reasons, but interior space is NOT one of them.

j

SteveH
02-29-2012, 09:41 AM
Many years ago, after sitting in the back of a T100 extra cab, I bought an F250 crew cab V10. Later sold it (didn't lose a dime) and after several years of trying to tow with an FZJ and a 3rd gen 4Runner, bought an '01 F350 crew cab 7.3 diesel. The ultimate family vacation machine. Very low on 'Fahrfehrgneugen', per VW, but tons of room for kids, junk, skis, luggage, lumber. 16 MPG on the highway (running expensive diesel). Nothing cheap about owning this truck. I'd go for the F150 crew, if towing at elevation isn't an issue.

DaveInDenver
02-29-2012, 11:08 AM
Only took a few posts to get Rick from a regular cab base Tacoma to a F350 XLT Crew Cab diesel. :-)

I was thinking more like...

1993 4x4 Ford F150 XLT Supercab Truck - $8500 (Aurora) (http://denver.craigslist.org/cto/2875419267.html)
1993 4x4 Ford F150 Truck
91,000 miles

2001 Ford F150 Supercrew 4x4 5.4L Triton V8 - $9800 (Brighton, CO) (http://denver.craigslist.org/cto/2874834137.html)
116,082 miles

Basic 4x4 truck, a bit of elbow room, plenty of life left, stupid easy to maintain /anywhere/ in North America. It'll be useful forever later in life as a hunting/farm/weekend chores truck after Rick puts 150k miles on it all smug that he waited and got to see and experience the world. The banks are always willing to give you money to put yourself into perpetual debt servitude...

theboomboom
02-29-2012, 01:58 PM
Some great thoughts all, thanks a bunch!

I'm still feeling things out, weighing the different options out there. Like I said I'm in no rush, just looking for the right deal. If I were up there already, I would be taking a serious look at this rig...

http://fairbanks.craigslist.org/cto/2855451427.html

DaveInDenver
02-29-2012, 02:26 PM
Some great thoughts all, thanks a bunch!

I'm still feeling things out, weighing the different options out there. Like I said I'm in no rush, just looking for the right deal. If I were up there already, I would be taking a serious look at this rig...

http://fairbanks.craigslist.org/cto/2855451427.html
Bingo, that's perfect.

Air Randy
02-29-2012, 03:25 PM
Be careful about buying "low mileage" vehicles in Alaska. They don't have a lot of miles on them but they start them up in October and they don't shut them off again until Spring. So the engines can have a zillion hours of idling on them (which is the worst thing to do to an engine).

If the vehicles come down off of the North slope they aren't very old but they beat the snot out of them. If they are used in the really cold areas they suffer a lot of metal fatigue too.

My advice is this: No matter how set you think your future is today with your current lady friend and your school plans, it could all drastically change and look totally different a year from now.

With that in mind, there are many reliable vehicles out there that meet your criteria that you don't have to go into serious debt to purchase. I'll tell you the same thing I told each of my 6 kids: Buy a low mileage 3 year old Subaru that got turned in off of a lease. They are reliable, awd, get great gas mileage, they hold their value well and you can still get a decent price for them when they have high miles on them.

Lets be honest, you have no case for NEEDING a truck right now so just admit that you WANT a truck. Thats OK. I still recommend the Subaru instead but if you must have a truck, go with a 1/2 ton GM/Ford/Dodge. Buy a used one coming off of a lease to avoid the depreciation loss. If it's less than 5 years old you can even purchase a warranty extension if you're concerned about those costs. An american truck from the lower 48 will be much easier to sell in Alaska if you need to get rid of it.

My closing advice is the same for vehicles as for girl friends: There are many different ones out there, don't buy/marry the first one you fall in love with. Try many more. Later, if the first one still feels like the best choice, go back and make the arrangement permanent. Right now your experience is with Toyotas. Good vehicles. There are lots of other good ones out there. Try some of them out before you make a final decision.

nattybumppo
03-04-2012, 01:36 AM
You know if I you Rick, I'd get a few year old F150 4x4 and be done with it. Should be able to find a late 10th gen (97-2003) or an early 11th gen (2004-08) in good shape without a million miles for ~$10k, particularly if you stick to the XL and regular cab.

That's all we drove as kids back when I was about your age, old Fords and Chevys. At that time it would have been late 1970s and early 1980s trucks, but we went everywhere, road trips to Utah and Oregon and Montana and Colorado. We spent summers doing construction and working in climbing and bike shops. I suppose had we grown up in Colorado we'd have driven old Toyota trucks, but in St. Louis Toyotas weren't as common.

X3 on this. Those Ford F150s are great and get about 18 on a trip if you don't stop on it, even towing! They are also all over the place in car lots now. Throw a cap on the bed and a foam matress on the floor and you have your own mobile hotel. When I was your age, I bought a new Toyota 4x4 long bed pickup and drove it for 10 years before I sold it. It was everything you described that you want...reliable, versatile, went anywhere, but times were different then. I had the 6 grand to plunk down and buy it outright, so I didn't have to worry about payments and full-coverage insurance, after a few years. If I were doing it now, and planning to go north young man, I would look for that F150 for sure.

Jacket
03-04-2012, 10:42 AM
Without re-reading all the posts in this thread, are you committed to a regular cab? To me, the lack of space for stuff in the cab would be a major deterrent, even if I was just a single guy in my 20's. I know the price point is better, but I suspect you'll wish you had an access cab and you'll soon want to upgrade for a bit more space. And then you'll discover that it's tough to sell a regular cab and they are not nearly as valuable as access and double cabs. My 2 cents....

Just so it's not all bad, I do think the wheelbase of the regular cabs make them great wheelers :)

DaveInDenver
03-04-2012, 11:10 AM
LOL! Different strokes for this 40-something married guy I suppose. I'd have no problem replacing my XtraCab with a current regular cab Taco. There's a bit of space behind the seat for the stuff I put back there (tools, maps and antennas, I chucked the seats about 3 days after getting and made a platform for the dog) and the extra couple of inches of width make a big difference. I'd definitely be fine with a full size regular cab. But we just use it to get places and don't have the kid dilemma. Not to mention that I don't cause an accident opening the rear window of regular cabs. :-)

coax
03-04-2012, 01:36 PM
One thing I didn't see mentioned: If you go with a new vehicle, don't forget to factor in license/registration fees in the initial cost. It can be significant. On my 19k mazda, it was around 7-800 or so, iirc.

theboomboom
03-04-2012, 01:49 PM
Well, when considering regular cab vs extended, I realize that the extended cab will never carry passengers as well as a sedan would. Nor will either get good gas mileage like a car would. So, in the case of the extended cab Tacoma, that small back area with "seats" for two is just too much of a compromise. I'd rather spend less up front for a regular cab truck, and plan on carpooling as a passenger rather than a driver when the situation arises. I had plenty of room for storage in my old truck inside the cab, utilizing space behind the seats and under them.

I emailed the seller of this truck, waiting to hear back about a time I could take a look at it and if he is firm on his price:

http://denver.craigslist.org/ctd/2877530632.html

I definitely like the V6, 5-speed, topper, and for that price I'd be looking at a comparable mid-size Toyota that is 6+ years older with an additional 100k on the clock.

Air Randy
03-05-2012, 05:51 PM
Well, when considering regular cab vs extended, I realize that the extended cab will never carry passengers as well as a sedan would. Nor will either get good gas mileage like a car would. So, in the case of the extended cab Tacoma, that small back area with "seats" for two is just too much of a compromise. I'd rather spend less up front for a regular cab truck, and plan on carpooling as a passenger rather than a driver when the situation arises. I had plenty of room for storage in my old truck inside the cab, utilizing space behind the seats and under them.

I emailed the seller of this truck, waiting to hear back about a time I could take a look at it and if he is firm on his price:

http://denver.craigslist.org/ctd/2877530632.html

I definitely like the V6, 5-speed, topper, and for that price I'd be looking at a comparable mid-size Toyota that is 6+ years older with an additional 100k on the clock.

That would be an excellent choice if it's as nice as the ad implies.