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View Full Version : Nishiki Pueblo bicycle - rebuild thread


Hulk
03-13-2012, 02:54 AM
I posted this question to Facebook, but it's probably much easier to discuss this here. My neighbor gave me this old bike they were going to throw out. It's a Nishiki Pueblo with Suntour components. It ancient but it looks like it's in good condition overall.

What should I do with it? Single speed sounds kind of fun. I'd like to be able to coast, so that's a single speed vs. a fixed gear, right? Sounds like I should plan on keeping the brakes although the levers are kind of hard to grip.

Is this worth messing with or should I just put some tubes in the tires and donate it to our neighborhood garage sale? I really think the Urban Outfitters bikes (http://bikes.urbanoutfitters.com/build_bull.asp) are cool and I'm wondering if I might be able to build my own and save some money too.

60wag
03-13-2012, 05:43 AM
All bikes are single speed if you have the discipline to not shift gears :)

It just doesn't say, "Yea, I'm hip!" with those derailers hanging on there. If you're going to put enough miles on it it claim that the weight savings and improvement in reliability are justified, go for it. If it is an occasional weekend rec' toy, put some air in the tires and pedal it.

DaveInDenver
03-13-2012, 06:03 AM
Can you take a couple of shots of the drive side? Does the bike have 2 chainrings or 3 in front? Is it 5 gears, 6 or 7 in the back. Looks like it has cantilevers, which is a good thing. I'm culling parts, so could help with getting that guy into a SS or updating some of the parts to keep it multi-geared.

Fixed gears is just what it sounds like, the front and rear do not free wheel. A single speed is just one gear (or what most people say OFG, one f'n gear). Nice thing about SS is you are never in the wrong gear. Of course you are also never in the right one, either. I run a 32:17 gearing on my SS, which is a converted hard tail. Reasons to do it are more than just weight (and they are VERY light), but simplicity (nothing to break and nothing to think about except riding) and they are SUPER quiet.

Beater
03-13-2012, 07:06 AM
as dave said, you will want to keep the freewheel hub if it has one and from that vintage it probably does. You can get single threaded cogs for the gearing. I have a freewheel tool you can borrow. It even has a sexy name, a chain whip.

It will take about 4 hours to convert.

MDH33
03-13-2012, 07:25 AM
Sometimes it's tough to get the chain tensioned right on a single speed conversion if the rear dropout doesn't face back, as in your second photo.

RicardoJM
03-13-2012, 07:34 AM
...What should I do with it? ...

Without a doubt in my mind - the first thing you should do is put some air in the tires, adjust the seat and handlebars to your size and ride it:D.

Building a bicycle is no different than building a truck and the first thing we ask guys building a truck is "what do you want to do with it?" If you want to ride the multi-use trail system (your house is in a great location for this) then that bike is basically good to go. If you want to start riding to work then you want some fenders and a rack.

60wag
03-13-2012, 07:42 AM
But can you fit 29s on it?

Beater
03-13-2012, 07:49 AM
Sometimes it's tough to get the chain tensioned right on a single speed conversion if the rear dropout doesn't face back, as in your second photo.

the oldest trick in the world to fix this.

leave rear derailleur on, remove cable. cut length of cable about 3-5 inches long leaving the nipple on though. insert non-nipple end into derailleur so that you can adjust reach to proper chain tension.

tadah!

wesintl
03-13-2012, 07:54 AM
not worth throwing any cash money at that thing. Put new rubber on it, adjust derailleurs and ride it like it is

farnhamstj
03-13-2012, 08:19 AM
That bike is just screaming for a rear rack and milk crate luggage carrier. Get a couple cans of spray paint and frame green and wheels red. Roll the handlebars forward and it will look like your photo-chop.

If hip cool guy is the look you're after, just grow a mustache. Then the coolness will stay with you even when you're off the bike.

Rezarf
03-13-2012, 08:53 AM
Chainsaw engine drive!

I am all for painting it flat black, single gear, and some ape hangers with leather tassels.

Hulk
03-13-2012, 10:45 AM
Ape hangers? :confused: Thanks for all the advice, guys.

sno bored
03-13-2012, 11:29 AM
Ape hangers? :confused: Thanks for all the advice, guys.

Bikes can be a money pit. I bought my cruiser bike a couple of years ago for $100 new. I've spent $500-600 on stuff so far and I am still dumping more money into it. The tiki torches on the ape hangers were for the fourth of July parade. The small flame behind the seat is a tiki torch that is always there. My project for the winter is getting a system rigged up so I can pull a lever and have a large flame shooting out the back with starter fluid.

Hulk
03-13-2012, 11:35 AM
Duuuuuude! That's the full size version of the bike I had when I was 10. Mine had a sparkly blue banana seat. :D

Corbet
03-14-2012, 08:47 AM
Don't waste a lot of money on that Matt. Put tubes in and ride "as is" or donate.

Beater
03-14-2012, 09:29 AM
slicks & tubes- 50 bucks. stem, bars and possibly brake levers? 65.00 Misc = grips and other leftovers 25.00....

craigslist is full of single speeds for 250.00 - you decide.

j

Hulk
03-16-2012, 12:56 AM
OK, photos of various parts, as requested.

Some brake photos:

http://rustybrain.com/nishiki/img/Brake1.jpg

http://rustybrain.com/nishiki/img/brake2.jpg

http://rustybrain.com/nishiki/img/brake9.jpg

Brake lever & thumb shifter

http://rustybrain.com/nishiki/img/brake-lever.jpg

http://rustybrain.com/nishiki/img/thumb-shifter.jpg

Two chain rings up front:

http://rustybrain.com/nishiki/img/double-ring.jpg

Back of crank arm:

http://rustybrain.com/nishiki/img/crank.jpg

Six cogs in the back:

http://rustybrain.com/nishiki/img/cogs-6.jpg

http://rustybrain.com/nishiki/img/suntour-derailleur.jpg

Stem:

http://rustybrain.com/nishiki/img/stem.jpg

Nishiki:

http://rustybrain.com/nishiki/img/decal-nishiki.jpg

:)

DaveInDenver
03-16-2012, 06:04 AM
It would be possible to convert that to single speed using BMX cogs. Main challenge is getting the chain line right. The inner chain ring might be close.

You know, honestly, the best thing to do is probably put tires and Slime tubes on it, get cruiser handlebars and a nice, comfy couch-saddle and just use it as a townie. Leaving it alone otherwise.

Beater
03-16-2012, 07:38 AM
It would be possible to convert that to single speed using BMX cogs. Main challenge is getting the chain line right. The inner chain ring might be close.

You know, honestly, the best thing to do is probably put tires and Slime tubes on it, get cruiser handlebars and a nice, comfy couch-saddle and just use it as a townie. Leaving it alone otherwise.

I concur - Sometimes it's just better to "clean it, lube it and ride it"

that was for you UB.

j

Red_Chili
03-16-2012, 08:10 AM
Matt - it's an old junker. Not that there's anything wrong with that. You know what they say about polishing a turd. Just ride it as is.

DaveInDenver
03-16-2012, 08:27 AM
Matt - it's an old junker.
It's a nice enough beater in this case, made in Japan. But that is not a desirable old frame. Had it been a higher end model maybe, but this was made when Nishiki was trying to increase market share and shot for the mass market dept store market. Straight gauge tubing, stamped drop outs, ham fisted butt welds. The Nishiki bikes that hold value are generally lugged using triple butted tubing (typically Tange but sometimes Columbus) and would have a rear derailleur hanger instead of the co-located one like this. Looking for models like the Competitor, Cervino, International, Olympic, Sport or Tourist.

Oh, I forgot. After you townie it up, this is mandatory:

http://farm3.staticflickr.com/2495/3778723962_bcc0039279_z.jpg?zz=1

Hulk
03-21-2012, 10:19 AM
Thanks, guys. I'll clean it up, lube the chain, and ride it. :)