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nakman
04-01-2012, 11:06 PM
First question for those of you who carry a tube with you on your bike, do you also have CO2 or something? Or a bike pump? how are you getting air into that tube... :confused:

farnhamstj
04-01-2012, 11:23 PM
Mountain bike hand pump. Works great. I carry a patch kit and spare 21" tube and 3 tire levers. After the first few flats, it's just like doing a mountain bike tire, except worse.

subzali
04-02-2012, 08:47 AM
Crossing my fingers, haven't gotten any flats yet. I have a mini mtb pump, that is bad enough to pump up a mtb tire. I can't imagine how horrible it would be to pump up a moto tire. Nak, I'm planning on carrying CO2 someday when I get my tire repair kit together, and maybe a hand pump as backup.

nakman
04-02-2012, 09:45 AM
I carried C02 on my mountain bike for a few years.. finally had the chance to use it coming down Porcupine rim once. Somewhere between the cartridge, its dispenser nozzle, my presta valve adapter, and the new tube, I didn't have a good seal and pfffft.. borrowed someone's pump. Probably won't go down that road again.

I'm still struggling with where to mount all this stuff.

subzali
04-02-2012, 09:57 AM
yep, CO2 takes practice and you never know how many flats you are going to get, so that's why I've been carrying my hand pump as a backup. But if you ride with friends you could coordinate that and save weight/bulk. I just have a backpack with water, tools, etc. for now. Would like to come up with some "saddle bags" eventually.

Beater
04-02-2012, 11:00 AM
on the small wheels - I carry a tube and a small pump. On the big bikes, (road) I carry health insurance and supplemental insurance as well as towing and recovery coverage, as when I have a flat, it's probably going to put me in the hospital if it happens fast enough. LOL

DaveInDenver
04-02-2012, 11:01 AM
Can't say how it relates to motos, but I have found a few things out riding and bike patrolling.

One is that CO2 is the bees knees racing but never rely on it if you're going far enough that walking back is going to be tough. I'll also use them for local rides, particularly after work, when time is limited. I always still carry a pump, even racing. But I mostly endurance race, so finding yourself at the half way point of a 111K enduro means you could be walking a long way back to the last aid station or a road.

Anyway, I think this Planet Bike pump might work well for you guys. It's really a mini floor pump. The little foot stand really does help and it has an actual tube, although a short one, that takes the pressure off the valve stem. It's sorta bulky for bicycles but might be a good option for you guys. It's too big to frame mount and better to carry in a backpack anyway.

http://ecom1.planetbike.com/1008.html

http://ecom1.planetbike.com/planetbike/media/1008.jpg

FWIW, since going to tubeless the use of pumps has gone down a whole, whole bunch... On the flip side, reseating a bead is pretty much impossible without CO2 and even then it's only if star align. So I just plan on putting in a tube if I rip a sidewall.

rover67
04-02-2012, 11:28 AM
I have a bike pump that works really well that I carry on the bike and plan to carry on the motorcycle:

http://www.universalcycles.com/shopping/product_details.php?id=31670&category=134

I used to carry CO2 but after using this pump a ton I only carry CO2 as a backup to the pump or like Dave says when I am in a hurry.

I have use that Lezyne a ton and it still is working well. I wouldn't get their CO2 inflators though, they suck.

I will carry a few of these as backup to the pump on the motorcycle:

http://www.universalcycles.com/shopping/product_details.php?id=41318&category=4090

Then a patch kit and a 21" tube.

baja1d
04-02-2012, 05:42 PM
CO2 works great to inflate the majority of the tire but use a mini pump to finish it off. I use to just rely on the CO2 but we got into distance riding which comes with multiple flats. On our last trip we changed 4 flats and rode the 5th one back 20 miles w/o any air... It sucked but it comes with the territory. At any rate, the two problems we ran into with the CO2 canister is #1 limited supply and #2 the canister piercing portion of the inflation device is rather flimsey. The first one broke imediately but unfortunately we didn't realize the issue until we had burned up two more canisters. The second device lasted longer but eventually broke. The one I currently own has lasted for years but I gently seat the canister into the inflation device now and generally pause my swearing episode until I know I haven't F'd it up. I too only carry a front tube, however, I keep it in a ziplock bag and throw some baby powder in the bag before I seal it closed. The powder helps lubricate the tube when inflating the tire and allows the tube to move when riding. My "pinch" flats have been drastically reduced since implamenting this technique. To be perfectly honest, the only time I actually put a rear tube in the rear tire is when I'm at home installing a brand new rear tire. Otherwise, it's a "trail side" front tube into the rear until I buy a new tire at the begining of the next season.

Buraaaaaaap,

nakman
04-02-2012, 05:57 PM
Cool tip with the baby powder!

So ok to ask a dumb question, you just carry a spare front tube? And if you get a rear flat just shove the front tube in back? I guess that's what Farnham said by 21"... sorry just clicking in now. :o

J Kimmel
04-02-2012, 06:12 PM
Cool tip with the baby powder!

So ok to ask a dumb question, you just carry a spare front tube? And if you get a rear flat just shove the front tube in back? I guess that's what Farnham said by 21"... sorry just clicking in now. :o

yep, front works on the front and you can jam it in the rear wheel to get you home too :)

I run heavy tubes and havent had a flat yet (knocking heavily on wood) and changing tubes sucks with moto tires, you are 1,000,000x better off learning in your garage :)

farnhamstj
04-02-2012, 09:02 PM
One of my favorite trail side flats was a nail in the rear tire. I put the bike on the kick stand. Undid bead lock. removed one side of the tire. Removed offending nail from tire and pulled that section of the tube out far enough to patch. Stuffed tube back in. Reset bead, pumped and was on my way. Never had to remove rear wheel. It was awesome.

I've had one that was mosquito heaven and a total nightmare rear tire removal and patch that didn't hold, so I had to repeat process. That time I wish I had CO2.

rover67
04-02-2012, 10:59 PM
I have had CO2 be really reliable. you just gotta find an inflator or head thinggie that works. I have had several that sucked and one that I kept and is awesome. I usually burn a few cartridges at home figuring out how to best use whichever I end up with. that's how you get to like one. Not on the trail.

Red_Chili
04-03-2012, 10:21 AM
First off, I run heavy tubes. Then, 21" tube for front or rear, carry it in a fender bag (front) made for the purpose. Also have room to stuff a CO2 kit, six little bottles. But I've never used it. Really. Not in 40 years have I had a flat offroad.

I probably just jinxed myself royally...

I do run minimal pressure, 14 front, 12 rear, thick walled tires with rim protection. In big rocks I might run a bit more.

Red_Chili
04-03-2012, 10:27 AM
For tools I put multitools in an MSR pack and wear it. I have a little tool pouch from Moose on the rear fender of the KDX but it mostly has spark plugs and a cool little plug wrench. A T-tool is awesome with an 8mm, 10mm, and 12mm socket, and Scott makes a mini ratchet that is awesome and light too. Allens, crescent, multi screwdriver, pliers, that is pretty much it. And a plug wrench for the XR, like it ever needs it. Might if I drowned it though!! Oh yeah, don't forget the epoxy putty, baling wire and duct tape.

Seriously. Fixed a BMW GS sump on the White Rim once with it. He rode it all the way back to Denver with nary a weep. Fixed the Thunderpig's clutch cover with it too, took 6 jagged parts and made one cover with a neat pattern in it. Epoxy putty is the schizz.

baja1d
04-03-2012, 10:27 AM
Cool tip with the baby powder!

So ok to ask a dumb question, you just carry a spare front tube? And if you get a rear flat just shove the front tube in back? I guess that's what Farnham said by 21"... sorry just clicking in now. :o

Yep

baja1d
04-03-2012, 10:37 AM
On older bikes I weld a 2" piece of 1/4' rod to the left rear axle head. I bend the tip of the rod so that it fits just inside of the tire adjustment sliders. With this installed it only takes 1 wrench to get the rear tire off/on because it prevents the axle from spinning while trying to loosen the bolt. Manufacturers seem to have gone to a similar set up the newer bikes. Just keeps some "wrench weight" off your back.

60wag
04-03-2012, 10:51 AM
Oh yeah, don't forget the epoxy putty, baling wire and duct tape.

Seriously. Fixed a BMW GS sump on the White Rim once with it. He rode it all the way back to Denver with nary a weep. Fixed the Thunderpig's clutch cover with it too, took 6 jagged parts and made one cover with a neat pattern in it. Epoxy putty is the schizz.

I just added a package of epoxy putty to the spares kit. I've read numerous comments on case repairs using the putty.

I also recently got an Ogio vest to try instead of a backpack. I'm not totally sold on it yet but its pretty neat. I need to get some trail miles on it to gain some confidence that its better than a backpack.

nakman
05-16-2012, 02:27 PM
I remember last night the next mod I need to do: ditch the straps that came with the fender pack, and bolt the thing directly to the fender with some (no pun intended) fender washers. I'm glad I didn't lose my new bag while out in Moab.. and noticed more than a few times at least one of the buckles coming free. I'm going to bolt the sucker down.

rover67
05-16-2012, 05:16 PM
And i needed the 21 inch tube in back trick. it worked in Moab well... heck it is still in the back now.. so did the CO2 tank mounted to the 100 that was acting as our magic chase vehicle :). that was the best spare to have

baja1d
05-17-2012, 12:08 AM
I remember last night the next mod I need to do: ditch the straps that came with the fender pack, and bolt the thing directly to the fender with some (no pun intended) fender washers. I'm glad I didn't lose my new bag while out in Moab.. and noticed more than a few times at least one of the buckles coming free. I'm going to bolt the sucker down.

Bolt it in but keep the straps. The bolts keep the bag on the fender and the straps keep things from bouncing around inside of the bag. The two together prevent the bag from being lost or opening and minimize the chance of a zipper seperating or breaking.

subzali
05-17-2012, 07:44 AM
what kind of fender pack(s) are you guys using?

subzali
06-01-2012, 08:27 AM
Bump?

J Kimmel
06-01-2012, 08:44 AM
I was using a Moose fender pack. I tried the front, hated it, and tried the rear too, hated it. Couldn't keep the front on, and the rear hit me in the butt too many times and if any of your heavier stuff (tools, nuts and bolts) aren't really really really tied down (maybe tie it down yet some more) the stuff moves around too much and wears a hole in the pack super fast. I carry minimal stuff to get me out in my backpack. You really don't need enough stuff to rebuild your bike out there ;)

nakman
06-01-2012, 09:07 AM
what kind of fender pack(s) are you guys using?

MSR fender pack. Nothing special, just what they had at Sun when I was there and remembered I wanted one.
http://lh4.googleusercontent.com/public/OiNGDsA5dgBQ9rc3zpBKHNPC79EX06-7UgrGHPKLNZav0ttWLjttx-Ky1d84MEEf6B0nA1jWbnyBkdN7gMRXKZ3n7InxLdV8mzXFRrpg4OSPKn__whddBY08wzmupmfgE6bDqbHQ9HGd2Q
http://www.google.com/products/catalog?q=msr+fender+pack&oe=utf-8&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&client=firefox-a&um=1&ie=UTF-8&tbm=shop&cid=12806124580596674756&sa=X&ei=ZMzIT-HfAc7TgQeEnJ2DAQ&ved=0CIQBEPMCMAE

I do notice that I bump into it with my butt occasionally, but don't seem to mind it kind of reminds me where I am. I kept the tube in the cardboard box it came in, the rest of the stuff is just crammed in there.

Jacket
06-01-2012, 10:50 AM
I bought one of the large packs from this guy in Gunnison:

http://dirt-bike-gear.com/

Keepin' it local.