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View Full Version : plumbing tech - fix my leaking toilet


nakman
10-11-2012, 11:35 AM
I installed a brand new toilet last night, and it's dripping. :mad: The drip is from the tank- after multiple failed iterations with the two bolts that hold the tank to the bowl, I finally bench tested the tank in the toilet to discover the leak is from the larger flush valve in the center, see Q and P in the drawing below.

http://www.cescobrass.com/images/repair2.gif

There's a big plastic nut on the bottom (which goes inside that squishy rubber gasket when you install) that I was able to loosen by hand. It was tight, but not that tight. Upon dis-assembly I noticed the opening in the tank itself is not exactly round, but rather somewhat oval-shaped, with a 1/4" gap on one side. So I took it apart, dried it all up, smeared silicone on both sides of the rubber flush valve gasket, filled the gap with silicone, and put a bead of silicone around the bottom of the opening, which I then squished with the nut. I don't have a channel lock that's big enough to really get on this, but was able to still get the nut pretty tight with what I have.

The tank is still sitting in the bathtub, allowing the silicone to dry. I'm now thinking I should have used plumber's putty though, rather than silicone. Reason being I just trapped silicone between a plastic nut and rubber washer- how's it supposed to dry? Anyway curious if anyone has an opinion on this, or has resolved this issue before.

I've had drips from the supply line, from the 2 bolts that attach the tank, and from the base at the flange before, but a drip from the big valve gasket in the center of the tank is a new one to me.. I just love plumbing. :rant:

DaveInDenver
10-11-2012, 11:45 AM
One opinion as it were, don't obsess and over tighten. Often hand tight is about right. I'd put a light coat of silicone or putty on the tank gasket, but you should not need to goober much unless the castings themselves are bad. The flapper valve, no idea why it would leak unless it's not sitting straight (due to the aforementioned overtightening) or the seat has a tear or a piece of crud.

Plumbing is one place that ham fists always struggle. It's about tightening things so that you have enough and uniform pressure, not necessary a lot of force. We've all done it, compression fittings that distort the pipe, tapered fittings that create a crack (this is super important on gas lines, enough to seal and no more!).

nakman
10-11-2012, 11:58 AM
One opinion as it were, don't obsess and over tightening. Often hand tight is about right. I'd put a light coat of silicone or putty on the tank gasket, but you should not need to goober much unless the castings themselves are bad. The flapper valve, no idea why it would leak unless it's not sitting straight (due to the aforementioned overtightening) or the seat has a tear.

Good point. Right now the torque on that big nut is a little tighter than it was, but still not as tight as it could be if I had a bigger wrench. I will leave as-is for this next trial.

Inukshuk
10-11-2012, 12:22 PM
Brand new? Sounds defective. Return it.
These things are not supposed to be complicated.

nakman
10-11-2012, 12:30 PM
Brand new? Sounds defective. Return it.
These things are not supposed to be complicated.

Yeah, thought of that. But I've already got the base bolted down, siliconed up all nice and happy, don't want to undo that. Plus I already tossed the box in the recycling. Oh, and plus I bought the thing almost 2 years ago- rolled it into one of my basement remodel purchases, then it turns out it won't fit in the basement bathroom so I decided to use it to upgrade the toilet upstairs. I guess I could drag just the tank down there? I dunno.. seems like I should be smart enough to stop a silly leak. :rolleyes:

Cheeseman
10-11-2012, 12:59 PM
The little Dutch boy over Holland comes to mind.

nakman
10-12-2012, 02:26 PM
The little Dutch boy over Holland comes to mind.

You lost me. :confused:


Anyway, it was either the silicone, or just tightening down the big nut, but no more drips. :offtobed:

Caribou Sandstorm
10-12-2012, 02:56 PM
Tim, I use plumbers tape, from home depot. It is what they plumbers use. The tape takes up any gap in the thread area and wa-la no leaky. You can use this and finger tighten should be good.

Maybe you already know about plumbers tape and tried this?

RicardoJM
10-12-2012, 03:18 PM
You lost me. :confused:
...

Read this (http://www.pantheon.org/articles/l/little_dutch_boy.html) :thumb:

nakman
10-12-2012, 03:31 PM
Chris by plumber's tape are you referring to Teflon tape? If so then yes, we go way back.

Caribou Sandstorm
10-12-2012, 04:48 PM
Gotcha, hmm does seem weird that it would leak.

I always have trouble with the many plumbing fittings, i.e. 3/4s is not always 3/4s..like sprinkler fittings where 3/4s means 3/4s..does that make sense?

wesintl
10-12-2012, 05:53 PM
if your toilet was outside this wouldn't be an issue...
sorry no help.. i'd need pics.
http://www.legendsofamerica.com/photos-oldwest/OfficeOuthouse2.jpg

simps80
10-12-2012, 06:40 PM
The little Dutch boy over Holland comes to mind.

You lost me. :confused:




Read this (http://www.pantheon.org/articles/l/little_dutch_boy.html) :thumb:



30695





thank goodness you fixed it!
he was getting tired
:)

Cheeseman
10-15-2012, 10:58 AM
Boy you make an intelligent comment, go away for the weekend with Scout activities and all kinds of clarification type information comes out. Thanks. Really though I hope it will be fixed for good. Those things are very annoying. You know.....the 5 minute job turns into.........

TIMZTOY
10-16-2012, 12:34 AM
not a hard fix, but if new, then return it. you dont need to spend money fixing a brand new toilet that should work.. thats why you bought a new one instead of rebuilding your old one i assume