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Caribou Sandstorm
11-10-2012, 08:47 AM
So I am getting a hot tub and wonder how tough it is to get 220 wired for it.

Gas is not really on my wish list.

Has anyone done this in a DIY format?

I have a separate junction box for the garage with the adequate space for the power, just need to figure out how to get the power to the tub.

euroford
11-10-2012, 09:04 AM
its not to bad, i hate doing elec stuff and just google searching i managed to come up with enough knowledge to hook up the welders, the hot tub, the sump pump and all of that stuff. by far the most unpleasant part is getting the wiring through the house, I have a ranch style home so i have full access end to end through the basement and attic. I hope your that lucky as a more complicated floorplan to turn that into a nightmare!

MDH33
11-10-2012, 01:46 PM
I replaced the heater and control box in ours last year myself and had to switch from a 3 wire to 4 wire 220. But, I ended up paying an electrician to do the new wire run between the control and main house fuse panel because I was freaked out about lots of electricity controlling a big tub of water. :o It was simple though, and I think the wire ended up costing more than the electrician. I thought it was worth it to have the expert do it and he ended up finding a ground issue I would have otherwise missed.

nuclearlemon
11-10-2012, 03:33 PM
easy. shut off the main power supply, run the wires, hook em up, turn power on. just have to know what size wire to run. i just finished running a 50a circuit for the welder/plasma since the only 220 outlet that i had was in the far corner of the garage.

if you need 6/3 romex, i can make you a deal on about 18' ;)

FJCDan
11-11-2012, 10:03 AM
Chris when I had mine installed you need a 50 amp breaker that is at least 10 feet from tub on outside of house. I don't know if code has changed, but you may need a permit and inspection. Dan

Caribou Sandstorm
11-11-2012, 10:09 AM
Chris when I had mine installed you need a 50 amp breaker that is at least 10 feet from tub on outside of house. I don't know if code has changed, but you may need a permit and inspection. Dan

Thanks Dan and all that have chimed in..

Corbet
11-11-2012, 11:01 AM
Chris, its not really any harder than 110 once you understand the wiring principles of 220. Just check your local codes for placement and distance from your hot tub (water source) and do it. If in doubt use the next heaver gauge wire for any given distance. And I would place an outside breaker near the tub whether code calls for it or not. Just easier in the long run.

Caribou Sandstorm
11-11-2012, 03:33 PM
Thanks Corbet!

Here is what I got today.. It was tough choosing this over maybe a 40 but I really have wanted one of these for post skiing days forever..

http://www.sundancespas.com/680series/peyton/

I think I did ok on price. 6400.00 includes Uncle Sam's take, delivery, cover, cover lift, chemicals, seats 6, 36 inches high..

Sundance uses a UV water cleaning light, so chemicals are minimal.

Got it from Spa Palace in Westminster off of Wads and 101st, Ryan is the sales guy. Really nice guy. Today was the last day of some truck sale...;)

The PO department is wondering why this did not go through the proper approval process and is having a hard time accepting this as worthy of emergency purchase status...

Corbet
11-11-2012, 04:22 PM
Now just make sure you put it under the zip line :lmao:

Rzeppa
11-11-2012, 07:24 PM
I just cracked open my copy of the NEC (National Electrical Code) Book and checked into hot tub and spa requirements. I should hope you would have known intuitively that everything needs to run through GFIs (Ground Fault Interrupters). Also, all wiring needs to be in conduit, and there are specific burial requirements. The spa and hot tub subsection is about 3 pages, the entire section (which also covers swimming pools and fountains) is about 21 pages.

I would bet a 6-pack that a hot tub install would require pulling a permit and passing inspection in most municipalities.

I would be comfortable doing this myself if I were interested in having a hot tub. It isn't rocket science, but there are very specific requirements.

Caribou Sandstorm
11-11-2012, 07:54 PM
I just cracked open my copy of the NEC (National Electrical Code) Book and checked into hot tub and spa requirements. I should hope you would have known intuitively that everything needs to run through GFIs (Ground Fault Interrupters). Also, all wiring needs to be in conduit, and there are specific burial requirements. The spa and hot tub subsection is about 3 pages, the entire section (which also covers swimming pools and fountains) is about 21 pages.

I would bet a 6-pack that a hot tub install would require pulling a permit and passing inspection in most municipalities.

I would be comfortable doing this myself if I were interested in having a hot tub. It isn't rocket science, but there are very specific requirements.

Thanks Zepp!

Inukshuk
11-11-2012, 08:01 PM
If you decide to hire it out I have a good company to refer you to.

DaveInDenver
11-12-2012, 06:22 AM
I would bet a 6-pack that a hot tub install would require pulling a permit and passing inspection in most municipalities.
He'd need to pull two permits if it was a permanent installation, general residential construction (Type 1R) and an electrical (Type 3).

http://www.denvergov.org/Portals/696/documents/Forms/1R_Building_and_Construction.pdf

http://www.denvergov.org/Portals/696/documents/Forms/3inputform.pdf

Remember that Denver uses the 2009 IBC with amendments and adopts the Colorado electrical code (which is 2011 NEC without amendment) with one amendment on the service entrance. Not all cities and counties use the 2011 NEC yet.

The wires don't have to be in rigid conduit if you meet length-to-installation requirements. This means LiquidTite is acceptable, which is what I'd do if it's a permanent installation and the electrical was not going to be visible.

You know the city requires home owners to either hire a contractor or take the competency exam? If you want to stay within the law and get permits you can't do the work yourself without taking the test. If you understand how the NEC & IBC work the exams are not too tough. This step is unique to Denver, most municipalities allow you to do your own work as long as you follow the code and get inspections.

But in this case I doubt you'll need a building permit. For pre-fab above ground pools with no improvements (e.g. you don't grade the site and pour a pad) there is no building permit necessary. For the electrical you can use a temporary connection, assuming you fall within the NEC rules. This would be if it's not fastened down and you can use a cord-and-plug up to a length of 15' and have an existing GFI outlet. You might need the permits if there is no outlet close enough.

Now you might need a zoning permit, depends on your neighborhood. Where you live in Observatory Park is not a historic district or anything, is it? Generally structures need a zoning review, but when it's temporary this is unlikely. AFAIK you are either urban-single family or urban edge-single family (we were E-SU-D in our old house, although you might be U-SU-C/D). I don't think you need a zoning permit for accessory structures that are classified exempt or temporary.

http://www.denvergov.org/Portals/646/documents/DZC/5_Urban_DZC_051112.pdf

DISCLAIMER: This is not to be taken as professional advice.

Caribou Sandstorm
11-12-2012, 08:24 AM
I just found this pretty cool walk-u thru video. I think I might hire it out though, might be faster and cleaner than if I do it myself.

http://www.spadepot.com/spacyclopedia/wiring-hot-tub-spa.htm#wiring-movie

black95
11-12-2012, 08:59 PM
Must be GFI protected, of course, and there has to be a disconnect more than 6 feet, but not more than 10 feet away from the inside of the tub wall. This is so the tub pumps can be turned off if someone gets stuck on the bottom suction port. (it happens)

There must be a GFI outlet within a certain distance, I believe it is 15 feet. I usually buy the GE disconnects with the GFI 50 amp 2 pole already in it. They're pretty affordable over other brands. The biggest mistake everyone makes is they take the neutral wire to the neutral bar and the breaker will just keep tripping. The neutral wire goes to the breaker. There are a few tubs that don't use a neutral -- pull one anyway, as someone mentioned, you may need it later. I would also used sealtite/ liquidtite conduit. It's tough, and rated for direct burial.

I totally disagree that electrical testing is easy. I've been taking them for 18 years and haven't taken an easy one yet.

good luck!

Luke,
Colorado master electrician :D

DaveInDenver
11-13-2012, 05:14 AM
I totally disagree that electrical testing is easy. I've been taking them for 18 years and haven't taken an easy one yet.
I was talking about the city competency test, these are relatively doable compared to state licensing tests.

Rzeppa
11-14-2012, 11:02 PM
Must be GFI protected, of course, and there has to be a disconnect more than 6 feet, but not more than 10 feet away from the inside of the tub wall. This is so the tub pumps can be turned off if someone gets stuck on the bottom suction port. (it happens)
Yeah, that was in there too.

There must be a GFI outlet within a certain distance, I believe it is 15 feet.

It was minimum 5 feet and maximum 10 feet. That made absolutely no sense to me, but yeah, it was right there in the NEC book.

Dang glad I don't live in Denver (based on what Dave said about their extra requirements).