PDA

View Full Version : Never fun...


theboomboom
01-30-2013, 07:08 AM
Got off the light rail yesterday after my night class and hopped in my truck, only to hit the clutch pedal and have it slam to the floor :banghead:

I popped the cap on the clutch master and the reservoir was nearly completely dry. I didn't have any DOT 3 at the time, so I called home and my dad brought be a bottle along with some tools. We fussed around with trying to get the system bled for a while, but pressure in the pedal never really built up. I got the truck home in 2nd gear and that's where it sits this morning.

I'm thinking my clutch slave cylinder has probably failed. There wasn't an obvious puddle of fluid below the truck, although there is a soft line that bridges two hard lines in the clutch system, and it appeared a little weapy behind the fitting on one end. I'm not sure if this was due to a leak, or if it was just spash back from the road yesterday...

Regardless, I plan on replacing the slave cylinder and the soft line, then bleeding the system. For those with experience- is there any advantage to going with an OEM slave cylinder over whatever is on the parts store shelf? Any gotchas/tips/tricks for this job?

Squishy!
01-30-2013, 07:28 AM
I've used NAPA masters and they've been really good. I let the system gravity bleed before pumping. Other than that the system is so simple it's impossible (nearly) to mess anything up.

DaveInDenver
01-30-2013, 07:42 AM
When I replaced the slave cylinder on my truck it was with the OE part from Burt. IIRC it was price competitive with aftermarket (I want to say about $45). Sometimes you get genuine Aisin parts from NAPA and IPW, though, so it's probably worth checking.

Getting at it is a PITA, but it's not the worst job ever. I wouldn't rule out a hard line, they can rust, too. I have one of those power bleeders that might be handy pressurizing the system to look for a leak. Not sure how I'd get it to you any time soon, tho.

RicardoJM
01-30-2013, 08:04 AM
Boom, we have a motive power bleeder. I replaced the brake fluid on the Bronco with it and it worked well. Seems like a good idea to use it to pressurize the system and see where the fluid is going.

loudbay
01-30-2013, 08:13 AM
I used the Napa on my 60 and had to reuse the OEM 'push rod'. The nut on the Napa part was barely bigger than the hole in the 'clutch lever' and the threads were different sizes. Other than that, EZPZ.

Good luck , M.

loudbay
01-30-2013, 08:16 AM
Oh yeah, this may be obvious to everyone but me, but disconnect the line from the slave before removing the slave from the truck. I felt pretty stupid putting it back on to get some torque on the line. And the rubber line is a separate part number, btw. Mine was fine, just the seal failed.

leiniesred
01-30-2013, 11:36 AM
Hey Rick:

Be prepared to buy a master cylinder. 9 out of 10 times that's where you'll find the problem in my experience. Pull back the carpet under the pedal and look for any signs of fluid. You might not see any sign, but hey maybe it will be obvious.

Anyway, the master cylinders always seem to give up in the cold weather, the fluid leaks out into the cab and under the carpet, and then no clutch. your rig is just kinda at the right age for the problem too. They are only good for about 1,000,000 pushes.

Good Luck!

nuclearlemon
01-30-2013, 11:45 AM
Sometimes you get genuine Aisin parts from NAPA and IPW, though, so it's probably worth checking.
.

most likely aisan cores that have been rebuilt with whatever parts the rebuilder used, not aisan internals.

RicardoJM
01-30-2013, 12:07 PM
... Any gotchas/tips/tricks for this job?

Step 1 - disconnect the battery. :D

DaveInDenver
01-30-2013, 01:19 PM
most likely aisan cores that have been rebuilt with whatever parts the rebuilder used, not aisan internals.
Good point, if it's rebuilt who knows what the guts are like, maybe cheap, wrong sized Chinese seals. FWIW, I've had good luck getting new Aisin parts through Amazon. I bought a brake master that I still need to put on, Aisin blue box, brand new that was 1/2 what Toyota wanted for same part in a red box.

I think this is the right slave for Rick's truck:
http://www.amazon.com/Aisin-CRT-014-Clutch-Slave-Cylinder/dp/B000JZDAW6/ref=au_pf_ss_4?ie=UTF8&Make=Toyota%7C76&Model=T100%7C1036&Year=1997%7C1997&carId=005&n=15684181&s=automotive

Aisin CRT014 - $26

CardinalFJ60
01-30-2013, 03:43 PM
Hey Rick:

Be prepared to buy a master cylinder. 9 out of 10 times that's where you'll find the problem in my experience. Pull back the carpet under the pedal and look for any signs of fluid. You might not see any sign, but hey maybe it will be obvious.

Anyway, the master cylinders always seem to give up in the cold weather, the fluid leaks out into the cab and under the carpet, and then no clutch. your rig is just kinda at the right age for the problem too. They are only good for about 1,000,000 pushes.

Good Luck!

x2

Squishy!
01-30-2013, 06:51 PM
hey Rick:

Be Prepared To Buy A Master Cylinder. 9 Out Of 10 Times That's Where You'll Find The Problem In My Experience. Pull Back The Carpet Under The Pedal And Look For Any Signs Of Fluid. You Might Not See Any Sign, But Hey Maybe It Will Be Obvious.

Anyway, The Master Cylinders Always Seem To Give Up In The Cold Weather, The Fluid Leaks Out Into The Cab And Under The Carpet, And Then No Clutch. Your Rig Is Just Kinda At The Right Age For The Problem Too. They Are Only Good For About 1,000,000 Pushes.

Good Luck!

X3

loudbay
01-30-2013, 09:33 PM
You guys are such negative nellies. Didn't he say he had a puddle under the truck? I've never had a master leak to the ground... I still vote slave.

DanS
01-30-2013, 09:44 PM
You guys are such negative nellies. Didn't he say he had a puddle under the truck? I've never had a master leak to the ground... I still vote slave.

He said no obvious puddle.

I'd order a master with it. They aren't all that expensive either. And whatever caused one to fail has probably damaged the other.

All this talk of cold and hard to get to....

I once replaced the master, slave, and soft line on a friend's Taco. In the winter. While it was parallel parked in downtown Denver. You haven't lived until you've had to time getting out from under the truck with traffic.

Dan

theboomboom
01-31-2013, 07:00 AM
Master and slave it is :thumb:

I'm planning on doing the work Friday afternoon/Saturday.

Hulk
01-31-2013, 12:39 PM
I've had good luck buying OEM parts at aftermarket prices here:

Import Car Parts Of Co
(303) 789-1789
1205 W Dartmouth Ave, Englewood, CO

Crash
01-31-2013, 01:45 PM
It's always a relief to have Dad, or a friend, come and rescue you. Should that not be an option, someday, it's good to know how to deal with a situation such as this all by your lonesome. We've all seen someone on the trail with a manual transmission vehicle start a killed engine with the truck in first gear and carry on. Shifting without a clutch is a skill every good wheeler with a manual transmission should be proficient at. If your starter and engine are up to the task, driving clutchless is really pretty easy and starting from a stop is the hardest part of the procedure but not really tough at all. Once you've driven away from a stopped situation shifting from gear to gear is pretty intuitive and easily accomplished even in downtown type traffic. Heck, even your average 18 wheeler driver can handle that. :hill: Just another tool in the skills bag that can save your bacon in a pinch should Dad not be available to help.

loudbay
01-31-2013, 05:43 PM
You haven't lived until you've had to time getting out from under the truck with traffic.

Dan

Roger that! Funny I read: no puddle as puddle.

Romer
01-31-2013, 06:12 PM
It's always a relief to have Dad, or a friend, come and rescue you. Should that not be an option, someday, it's good to know how to deal with a situation such as this all by your lonesome. We've all seen someone on the trail with a manual transmission vehicle start a killed engine with the truck in first gear and carry on. Shifting without a clutch is a skill every good wheeler with a manual transmission should be proficient at. If your starter and engine are up to the task, driving clutchless is really pretty easy and starting from a stop is the hardest part of the procedure but not really tough at all. Once you've driven away from a stopped situation shifting from gear to gear is pretty intuitive and easily accomplished even in downtown type traffic. Heck, even your average 18 wheeler driver can handle that. :hill: Just another tool in the skills bag that can save your bacon in a pinch should Dad not be available to help.

Steve, in the post he said he drove it home:D

theboomboom
01-31-2013, 06:16 PM
It's always a relief to have Dad, or a friend, come and rescue you. Should that not be an option, someday, it's good to know how to deal with a situation such as this all by your lonesome. We've all seen someone on the trail with a manual transmission vehicle start a killed engine with the truck in first gear and carry on. Shifting without a clutch is a skill every good wheeler with a manual transmission should be proficient at. If your starter and engine are up to the task, driving clutchless is really pretty easy and starting from a stop is the hardest part of the procedure but not really tough at all. Once you've driven away from a stopped situation shifting from gear to gear is pretty intuitive and easily accomplished even in downtown type traffic. Heck, even your average 18 wheeler driver can handle that. :hill: Just another tool in the skills bag that can save your bacon in a pinch should Dad not be available to help.

That, and thank goodness it's easy to defeat the clutch safety switch in a Toyota!

Trapper50cal
02-01-2013, 06:03 PM
RockAuto

Aisin Clutch Master - not expensive at all.

theboomboom
02-02-2013, 12:25 PM
Thanks all for the reccomendations for parts. I ended up going with a Napa master/slave, and found the soft line that i needed at O'Reily. The work was performed yesterday afternoon, and I've had it out on a couple drives since. The new parts seem to be doing great :thumb:

Squishy!
02-02-2013, 01:56 PM
Nice!