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CardinalFJ60
02-05-2013, 04:53 PM
Baofeng are latest in super inexpensive Ham HTs...only 4W, but like $40-$50 each. :eek:

Nakman, did you get yours yet? How are they?

nakman
02-05-2013, 09:17 PM
Just came in yesterday! simultaneously the niftiest and most annoying radio I own, all at the same time.. the rubber duck antenna seems to work great, but the threads are opposite every other HT antenna I have. Which means I'd need to get a male to male coupler if I wanted to run a different one, and I can also screw two antennas together. :confused: But the charging base is pretty trick- just drop it in and it charges- no more digging for the right AC adapter... that in itself makes this a cool radio.

it works great in simplex, I was able to type in 146.460 and talk to myself in the truck instantly, I only had to change the default frequency step from 25kHz to 2.5 kHz to dial it in. then I plugged in 462.6375 and was able to talk to Gavin on his wristwatch walkie talkie channel 4... cool, just what I was hoping. Kept it at 1 watt to keep the copters at bay...

I flipped it to dual mode (option 7) and the radio seemed to randomly select between A and B. that was a little annoying. Then I just programmed in 2 repeaters, took a while to figure out but the settings you need are options 25 and 26, same as I think 38-39 on the Yaesu.. but once saved, the settings changed for everything in the memory. Meaning I was now transmitting at a negative -offset on 146.460 simplex, because that's what I needed to hit the last repeater I programmed. And when I changed T-CTS option 13 from 123hz to 107.2hz to program the 145, well now that changed the 145.310 memory to 107.2 as well. you gotta be kidding me... :mad:

I was able to transmit onto the 145.310, the 145.145, and 146.460, but never when trying to save one or the other to memory, as it would alter the settings of the other two. After a brief search, it sounds like I need to get the optional computer cable to program in the repeaters, as it just doesn't work using the radio interface... a firmware glich they say.

Anyway, for $40 I'm still happy- I'll be able to monitor the kids a little easier while camping this summer and even yak back if I have to, plus I've got a cheap hand-held to toss in a non-Ham truck on a club run to let someone else monitor.. The LED flash light is kind of cool, and it'll play a little alarm if you want, beyond that I'd rather spend my time programming one of my Yaesu radios for repeaters. But heck for $40? still worth it.

edit: I got the Baofeng UV-5R from Amazon http://www.amazon.com/BaoFeng-UV-5R-136-174-400-480-Dual-Band/dp/B007H4VT7A/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1360124315&sr=8-3&keywords=baofeng

nakman
02-05-2013, 09:23 PM
I'll bring them to the meeting in case anyone wants to mess with it, let me know!

edit: And Shawn if you order one, may as well get the cable too :0 http://www.amazon.com/Programming-Cable-Baofeng-UV-5R-Radio/dp/B008ORT9OY/ref=pd_sim_e_8

nakman
03-28-2013, 09:52 AM
Well judging by the phenomenal amount of responses here, I am going to speculate that everyone didn't run out and order a Baofeng. :lmao: However, BJTLC100 and I are going to meet at Jeffco Fairgrounds a little early on 4/3 to program his HT, hopefully using laptop and cable technology. If anyone is interested in that, you're welcome to join.. thinking around 6:30? If it's snowing sideways we'll be over at Stevenson. This will be the first ever "Baofeng HT's in 100's" run, but all vehicles & radios are welcome providing they have a selectable transfer case and 2m propagation.

DenCo40
03-28-2013, 11:15 AM
Hey Nakman, not to hijack the thread or anything but If you have a moment on 4-3. Maybe you can show me around on my yeasu a little. I've been listening little on it and studying for the test as well. Most likely Jenny Cruiser and I will be at the fairgrounds for the recovery meeting..

nakman
03-28-2013, 02:36 PM
Yeah sure man you bet, come on out early! I will shoot to be there by 6:30.. need to get there early anyway to setup the demos, direct parking, etc. Which Yaesu did you end up getting?

DenCo40
03-28-2013, 03:58 PM
Yeah sure man you bet, come on out early! I will shoot to be there by 6:30.. need to get there early anyway to setup the demos, direct parking, etc. Which Yaesu did you end up getting?

I picked up a vx-7r. After reading up on what most people have I figured I would get a popular model...

BJTLC100
03-28-2013, 06:36 PM
Looking forward to meeting more RS members and getting my new Baofeng HT unit up and running! See you guys on Wednesday! (My 16 yr old son and a buddy may be tagging along! They are super excited!)

Brad (BJTlC100)

Fishy
03-30-2013, 09:41 PM
Looking forward to meeting more RS members and getting my new Baofeng HT unit up and running! See you guys on Wednesday! (My 16 yr old son and a buddy may be tagging along! They are super excited!)

Brad (BJTlC100)

Glad to see you can make it Brad. Looking forward to having you in the club!

daveIT
03-31-2013, 08:01 AM
I have an older UV-3R and a UV-5R...both good little radios once you figure out the quirks and how to program them. The Yahoo groups for the radios are super informative, so if you get one I recommend becoming a member & subscribing or just going through some of the old posts.

The 3R seemed like a toy, but worked great when I used it around town. The 5R feels substantial and is a big step up IMO.

I have not seen the 7R yet.....must resist...

W0ALE / Dave

Fishy
03-31-2013, 09:50 AM
I would love some help programing my 7900. I have read the manual a few times, I think I'm reading the English version but I can't tell. I only use 2 or 3 frequencies and I just dial them in via the handset.

BJTLC100
03-31-2013, 04:57 PM
Thanks Stan! Hopefully we'll see you on Wednesday night!

Brad

wesintl
04-08-2013, 07:05 PM
f-n A.. just got me a UV-3R! sweet for 35 bones. I'm going to have to get another.

http://www.amazon.com/Baofeng-UV-3R-Display-136-174-400-470MHz/dp/B006J4G49C

nakman
04-09-2013, 09:04 AM
Incredible. I may have to get a 3 as well, just cause.

I am going to spend more time with Brad's programming cable this week, if you make the ham & eggs run I will hopefully be able to download some channels to these things.

rover67
04-09-2013, 09:39 AM
just ordered a UV-3R.

couldn't pass up a micro radio for 35 bucks.

ridiculous.

Crash
04-09-2013, 10:08 AM
just ordered a UV-3R.

couldn't pass up a micro radio for 35 bucks.

ridiculous.

Same here, have to join the 21st wheeling century sooner or later. $35 made it easy. Thanks for the heads up, Wes.

DaveInDenver
04-09-2013, 10:10 AM
Steve, are you studying? Cool. There's enough interest in a ham class and test, I need to schedule it. Won't happen before Cruise Moab and probably not before Rubithon, but maybe.

Not sure this is the best first radio (low power and cryptic even for a ham radio), but they are cheap and disposable.

Crash
04-09-2013, 10:24 AM
Steve, are you studying? Cool. There's enough interest in a ham class and test, I need to schedule it. Won't happen before Cruise Moab and probably not before Rubithon, but maybe.

Not sure this is the best first radio (low power and cryptic even for a ham radio), but they are cheap and disposable.

Studying? For what? :hill: You'll just tell me everything I need to know, right? Just cancelled the UV-3R order and ordered the UV-5R after reading the reviews at Amazon. $40 with free shipping, so what the heck. Won't be here in time for the Ham 'n Eggs thing but will be there to watch.

DaveInDenver
04-09-2013, 10:27 AM
Well, yeah, the club ham class is pretty much 3 days of teaching what you need to know to pass the test. I don't think there's been anyone not pass on the first try that has been through the class, either. Pretty sure.

Are you coming up Saturday? That would be keen.

Caribou Sandstorm
04-09-2013, 04:47 PM
just ordered a UV-3R.

couldn't pass up a micro radio for 35 bucks.

ridiculous.

x2... saw Wes' UV-3R today.. Just pulled the trigger after I called my Ham expert..

wesintl
04-09-2013, 05:36 PM
Just came in yesterday! simultaneously the niftiest and most annoying radio I own, all at the same time..

It is annoying to program. for my little 3r i'm going to set it on 146.460 and pretty much leave it for a camp radio in the pocket etc. perfect for what I need with having a yaesu 8r. I wanted a little guy to carry around and be able to chat with folks. It's perfect for that.

OilHammer
04-09-2013, 06:38 PM
Did you know there is a 3R and a "plus"? Apparently, the MkII model has the antenna that Tim is describing, but this was changed on the plus to a common style. They also changed the battery though, and the MkII has the same battery spec as cheap cameras, so they are easy to find. The plus is a proprietary battery. Which one is better? Who knows...just be aware that they aren't all the same.

Helpful review on the Zon:

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Nice Dual Band HT (for the price), January 27, 2013
By AUgie the Prospector - See all my reviewsAmazon Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Baofeng UV-3R PLUS* U/V 136-174/400-470MHz 2M/70CM Dual-Band-Display Two-way Radio (Electronics)
Update: Since the below review, I've had a chance to test the Baofeng UV-3R+ with several mountain-top 2 meter repeaters in the Las Vegas area. I've upgraded my opinion of its ability to reach more distant repeaters, so long as they are high enough to have a clear path (I left my more guarded initial opinion unedited below). Since I used it with the Puxing PX-777+, I'll comment on that inexpensive Chinese VHF HT too.

The "contacts" were mere call-sign announcements in most cases, which only occasionally get a response. ("Kerthunking" - keying down to test repeater access without announcing your call sign - isn't kosher). I did get a nice response and QSO with another HT from the other side of the Valley on the most distant repeater. He was using a Wouxun HT - I didn't get the model.

My location was a parking lot away from really tall buildings, though a high-rise off-strip casino was only a block or so away. I wasn't in the direct radio shadow of it though. I used Google Earth to measure the distance from my position to the listed location of the repeaters (3 mountaintops surrounding the Las Vegas Valley). The UV-3R+ was running on High power (2 watts), and the PX-777+ was running on Low power (also around 2 watts).

The closest repeater was only 10.5 miles away. Not surprisingly, both the UV-3R+ and the PX-777+ gave a good signal through that repeater.

Next were two adjacent repeaters both 27 miles away. The high-peak repeater gave a pretty clear signal, though not "full quieting" by any means. The adjacent lower peak repeater was scratchy but understandable - not a signal you'd want to use for routine work, but usable in a pinch. Here, the Puxing, transmitting, gave a much more usable signal, though still sub-par. I attribute that to the Puxing's somewhat larger single-band antenna. This fringe repeater (due probably to partial blockage of the direct path) showed the limitations of the UV-3R+ in areas of marginal coverage, with its low maximum power and smaller antenna.

The final repeater was 35 miles out, on the other side of the valley, but it gave a good clear signal with both the Baofeng UV-3R+ and the Puxing PX-777+ HTs transmitting (and the other receiving), even better than the higher of the two 27 mile peaks. My QSO on the 35 mile repeater happened to be with the Puxing, as I'd just finished calling with it, but I'm sure that the Baofeng would have done fine too, as I'd just heard my first call come back pretty clearly from it.

As mentioned in the below review, I've called from the same area on several 70 cm repeaters, located on some of the same peaks, but didn't get a QSO started. I know I was opening them from the squelch tail, but don't have another UHF HT to listen to my signal. I don't spend much time in the valley, but did hear some clear local rag-chew calls on the 27 mile distant repeater location on 70 cm as I drove out. Based on what I heard today, I probably could have made a good contact on 70 cm if I'd been so inclined.

This little HT puts out good audio, and will clearly reach out to very distant repeaters if they are high enough to get something close to line-of-sight.

Original Review:

The UV-3R VHF/UHF HT comes in several models, with this being the latest. The earlier units had a somewhat slimmer case, with the trade-off being that they weren't as rugged and had a less serviceable belt clip. If you want the tiniest and cheapest dual-band HT, the "Mark II" model (not usually so identified in advertising) might be available for a few $ less (including here on Amazon). This one is only a little larger and has several advantages over the Mark II, and one potential minor disadvantage.

Neglecting the branding issues, here are the three major variants from my reading online (this family of tiny HTs has appeared under a variety of names, but all are recognizably the same few variations):

Mark I: Single line display, truncated setup menu, various technical issues including lots of spurious emissions, separate antennas for each band, etc. - this one should be avoided.

Mark II: Two line display, full setup menu (18 choices, so it can be completely programmed without hooking to a computer), single antenna (at least later versions), some of the technical issues fixed - this one is a serviceable choice. One nice thing: it uses a commonly available Li-Ion battery shared with some popular digital cameras, so spare batteries are inexpensive and easy to find.

"+" unit (this one): Added one more menu item (setup of "priority channel"), rugged case, new connector setup. Now standard Kenwood-style speaker-mics can be used, as is common on several HT brands, including other inexpensive Chinese units. Similarly, the antenna connector has been changed to the type used on many other inexpensive HTs, so that the choices for after-market antennas is wider (and cable adapters easier to find). As part of the ruggedization, the battery attachment has changed and now a custom battery is used (looks like the old battery, just in a different casing). The newer batteries are available, just not so many places. Be careful when ordering batteries as often there is no distinction made between models and older style batteries will be sold as fitting all radio models. BTW, charging is different for the "+" model too. Unlike earlier models, this one has a charging stand, which is powered by a USB-type 5V supply (would any USB supply work? I haven't checked). I don't particularly like charging stands (though it will accept a loose battery for a "dumb" unregulated charge), but hope that USB power will make charging less dependent on the supplied wall adapter.

Some notes on programming. With only 19 menu items and a two-line display, manual programming of frequencies and setup for repeaters is easy and intuitive once you figure out the order to use the 3 buttons primarily involved (plus the selector knob on top). There are tip sheets easily found online if the manual's stilted description is too opaque. One thing missing: no alphanumeric channel descriptions, so you'll have to remember the channels by order entered and frequency. I made a point of setting them up to match my other HT, and I'm used to that order and channel numbering. Grouping them by repeater, non-repeater and area helps too, as you'll see the repeater offset indicator go on and off on the display as you move through sets of repeaters. An unused channel here and there to break up the list will help you keep track as well.

I hate connecting everything I own to a computer, so want my HTs to be fully programmable stand-alone if necessary (there is serviceable after-market/freeware programming software - easily found online). About the only thing you can't do through the keypad is set up cross-band operation (using repeaters that receive UHF and transmit VHF, or vice-versa). Most people won't need that, but if they do, there is the programming software, which I THINK can do that (this doesn't impress me as a unit particularly fit to work satellites, one use of cross-band communications).

The lack of a numeric keypad doesn't impede programming too much (it helps that a function button puts the frequency selection into 1 MHz steps to move rapidly across the band). Of course, with no keypad you can't output DTMF tones to access repeater features such as phone or internet patches. If you are that into using repeater networks, then you know you need the keypad, and will step up to one of the many models that have one (such as Baofeng's UV-5R).

Like some other inexpensive Chinese HT's, this one has a very slow scan function and makes a poor scanner. If you don't have too many channels programmed it is OK in channel scan. Its "dual watch" feature is hinky (monitor a frequency on VHF and another on UHF), because you can get confused about which you are talking to if you key down to respond. Be careful scanning not to key down on a channel that you've programmed to monitor where you have no authority to transmit.

I've not even tried the FM radio feature - makes no sense to me, but it's there for those who want it - VHF or UHF channels being monitored will reputedly interrupt the FM programming if they break squelch.

I've only had the UV-3R+ a few days, but from my limited experience, and what I've read, I can say that FOR WHAT IT IS, it is a good deal. With only 2 watts power you aren't going to reach very distant repeaters as well (though antenna size and height make more difference than power). I can get a scratchy signal through some pretty distant mountain-top repeaters, but you'd not want to talk long with that kind of signal irritating the poor guy at the other end. The audio seems OK, both send and receive, so long as you aren't working too distant a repeater. The receive sensitivity is good - and you can get good clear reception of repeaters that you can barely open, or not open at all.

The squelch is reputed to only have 3 levels, including off, though there are 10 choices in the menu (0, 2 and 5 are distinct, the rest are equivalent to either 2 or 5). I've found that the lowest level will squelch most frequencies, even in an urban area, though to keep it quiet across the band the higher squelch level is needed in some spots. A knock on this unit online is that it gets overloaded in urban settings. Being an SDR (software defined radio), it is dependent on receive bandwidth to keep the digital stages from getting overwhelmed. In areas with a lot of transmitters active, this unit lets in too many extraneous signals over too wide a range for either the input stage or the SDR to handle. I believe those people who have reported this. However, in a built up suburban/commercial area, I've not seen this happen over several days use. It might in certain dense urban areas with lots of local radio traffic.

Battery life seems good, though I've hardly gotten the battery broken in (avoid recharging too soon or too late - with full bars or no bars - recharge at one or two bars). The digital report of battery voltage at power-up is a nice touch.

So, if you want a tiny little HT to cover both VHF and UHF (2 meters and 70 cm for Hams), can accept that it isn't going to have the punch of a base unit, and might choke in the occasional urban or repeater-cluster "radio alley", and you don't need DTMF keying, then this is an incredibly inexpensive way to monitor a few channels in a big swath of VHF and UHF, talk on local simplex, and work nearby repeaters. This gets you "in the game" for very little $, in a cute and easy to use package.

P.S. A note on band coverage: This thing will transmit anywhere in the broad swath of VHF and UHF that it can tune. Most of that range is not legal for you (or me) to transmit. Some of it is used by police, fire, EMS, or military who will NOT take kindly to us chattering on their frequencies. Just because a frequency sounds quiet doesn't mean that it isn't in use by someone using a transmission mode that you can't hear or on a low duty cycle. If you have an amateur licence (very easy to get these days with a little study) then much of the 2 meter and 70 cm bands are open to you (though take a look at a band plan - it is surprising how much of these big wide bands are dedicated to uses other than FM voice, especially simplex (unit to unit with no repeater). Though it will tune some licensed and unlicensed bands such as MURS, FRS and GMRS (here in the USA), and can be set up to meet their emission requirements (power and FM deviation), it doesn't meet various legal requirements (certification for those bands). I've programmed in some of those frequencies to monitor on occasion, but plan not to key down on them unless it is an emergency (when even the law gives some latitude for communicating in life-threatening situations). If you want to monitor a frequency that you can't transmit on, consider programming an offset to somewhere you can (I don't know if transmission can be prevented with an odd-ball transmit frequency or offset - that's worth checking!).

If you buy one of these little things, take a look at the legal requirements for transmitting on various bands it covers and how you can obey them - not so much because the FCC would be beating your door down if you key down on the wrong frequency with the wrong settings or paperwork (though they might if you do it egregiously enough!), but as a courtesy to other legitimate public and private users of the spectrum.

A final warning: If you've not researched this radio elsewhere, and are the kind who starts messing with tech items before reading the instructions, this little beauty has a trap: The selector knob on top LOCKS. Pull it up to unlock it, snap it down to lock it. A few people have reported breaking the knob mechanism trying to turn it while locked!

nakman
04-09-2013, 10:43 PM
Alright, call me Feng Shui of the Baofeng. I've spent the past 2 hours downloading drivers, software, and then hand entering about 50 channels into the Baofeng programming software. The positive is, I got it to finally work! I also ordered my own cable, which means I can give Brad's back.. :o


So in channels 1-5 I have the RS simplex frequencies. In channels 6-10 I have a few of the more common local repeaters- 145.145, 145.460, and 147.225, also the 145.310 (Boulder/Denver area) and 145.355 (Grand Junction) Colorado Connection machines.

I left some space for others.. .then in 25-39 I put all of the Cruise Moab simplex frequencies. I didn't double up on the ones already captured in 1-5.

Left some more space, and then in 50-71 entered all of the USA FRS channels. I also defaulted that output power to LOW, keeping you on the straight & narrow.

Scanning takes about 10-12 seconds to get through the entire loop. Which means you should be able to hear your buds, hear the other runs, and hear the kids & quads, all with the touch of a button. And best part according to the forums I read tonight, the same software and driver should also work with the UV-3's, as I was only uploading both of my UV-5R's tonight with good success, my UV-3 won't be here until next week most likely as I cheaped out on the shipping. but I'll test this on a 3 as soon as one hits my hand.

I'll bring it all to Ham & Eggs this Saturday, hope to be there by 11:00, need to leave by 1:00, but it takes about 1 minute to dump the data once the laptop is fired up. Good times..

Caribou Sandstorm
04-10-2013, 12:04 AM
Done just got the 5r also not the plus. 43.00 free shipping, arrives Friday!

Just realized the 3r I bought is also dual band....

nakman
04-10-2013, 08:57 AM
One last point with the programming is that it'll put the exact same stuff on both bands. I actually prefer it this way, but on other dual band radios (Vx-7, etc.) you can have separate programming on the Main and Sub bands. On my FT-8800 mobile rig I tend to put all the repeaters on the left, and simplex on the right.. just makes it a little more intuitive, that's all.

So just know that if you have me dump the programming to your radio that you're going to have clones on both bands. Also know that from my experience if you attempt to modify one of the channels, that you'll potentially influence all of the other saved channels- that was my experience at least initially. I will test that theory later this week.

timmbuck2
04-10-2013, 09:02 AM
My UV-5R plus radios are coming tomorrow, look forward to having Nakman do his magic on them. :) Never thought about monitoring the kiddos on them....what radios do your kids have? On our 15 acres, I bought them a couple of the cheap FRS/GMRS radios to play with. A wrist mounted radio sounds super cool, like real spies! :)

OilHammer
04-10-2013, 09:06 AM
And just for the heck of it, I ordered a 3R plus so that we can compare it to Wes' unit first hand. Here's to dumping the family style walk-talkies on ebay unless someone with kids wants them.

DaveInDenver
04-10-2013, 09:12 AM
Do these radios transmit on FRS?

And you as good hams know that this is frowned upon, legally at least.

nakman
04-10-2013, 09:20 AM
Do these radios transmit on FRS?

And you as good hams know that this is frowned upon, legally at least.

Yes, and yes. Legal to monitor, but illegal to transmit. One of the many features of this radio. :rolleyes: I defaulted the power down to "low" for the FRS channels, just to get closer to legit, but it's still too high by FCC standards. Here's your power output:


Power output VHF:
136.000 MHz: High=3.4 Watts, Low=1.6 Watts
155.000 MHz: High=4.0 Watts, Low=1,75 Watts
175.000 MHz: High=3.8 Watts, Low=1,8 Watts
Power output UHF
400.000 MHz: High=3.0 Watts, Low=1,75 Watts
440.000 MHz: High=3.1 Watts, Low=1.1 Watts
480.000 MHz: High=2.3 Watts, Low=1.0 Watts



Here are your rules from the FCC, where you can learn that the limit is .5 watts: http://www.fcc.gov/encyclopedia/family-radio-service-frs.

And more to the point on band plans, and a more serious issue IMO, is that these can also allow transmitting outside the normal 2m band plan for amateurs. Which means you could interfere with police, fire, other emergency channels. One would think it's only a matter of time before the big clamp comes down on the import here, and in the mean time partially why I'm stock piling a couple of these. Not that I want that function, more because I just want a cheap HT for legit purposes- but that's a much more serious deal here, and to transmit on those channels, even accidentally, goes directly against one of the fundamentals of amateur radio. Be careful.

DaveInDenver
04-10-2013, 09:31 AM
Part 95 FRS radios are also required to have fixed (that's non-detachable) non-gain antennas and be Part 15 compliant for EMI and RFI susceptibility and compatibility. Ham radios often have some of this but are only required to keep RF energy inside our bands, if they cause interference it's only your fellow hams to whom you have to answer and at your best operation and engineering practices.

Outside the ham bands radios can't be setting off car alarms or upsetting vehicle computers. Just be sure if you do chose to use these radios for FRS that you aren't screwing stuff up. There are a lot of UHF devices out there, not just radios. Medical RFID devices for example, there is some logic behind the rules in this case since the spectrum around 400-500MHz is probably the most used and sought other than the cell phone bands.

We have quite a lot of spectrum in the band that is under constant threat and finding hams transmitting illegal is one major red flag that will bring the FCC hammer down. It's easy for them to tell, FRS radios have the tailing tones where ours don't and GMRS users have to be licensed just like us. Some of it is already allocated on a secondary user basis, so complete loss is not a remote possibility.

nakman
04-11-2013, 11:45 PM
So I'm talking on the 145.145 today on my way home. The QSO started out with the Baofeng, but the gentleman with whom I spoke gave me a very weak signal report, so I then switched the HT off and continued the conversation on the mobile rig. To start, I vowed to change the default power on the local repeaters from "low" to "high," which I have just completed.

the other tip I received was a free software called Chirp. check out http://chirp.danplanet.com/projects/chirp/wiki/Home where I also downloaded it. This software appears to be far and away superior to the pseudo-Chinese UV-5R_newold program from Baofeng. For one I can export the file now to .csv, which means I'm a save away from an .xls file, I'll post that here.

the other thing I was able to do was toggle on "dual watch" function, which makes the dual band radio actually behave like a dual band radio, picking up from both channels yet giving priority to the one you're selected to transmit on. I tried to get that working from the menu setting in the radio, and it just wasn't doing it, so happy to force that through the software.

We'll see if I learn any more tricks tomorrow night..

nakman
04-12-2013, 12:21 AM
Wow, Chirp also has downloads for all the repeaters, FRS frequencies, dang there's an hour I'll never get back. :doh: cool software though.

DaveInDenver
04-12-2013, 05:49 AM
I mentioned CHIRP before, recently here. Getting to be decent software, but I have scrambled radios with it some time ago. I have it working on Mac OS X with some of my RT Systems cables. They use FTDI and Prolific chipsets but set custom VIDs and PIDs so you have to tweak kexts (Mac equivalent to Windoze drivers). CHIRP also works with Linux, which is where it really shines.

Crash
04-12-2013, 09:41 AM
Damn, you guys are making me wonder what the heck I'm getting into. Life is too short to make it so complicated. Vinyl, biplanes, CB, 50's Mercuries are where I'm at! Gotta be hip though, so see you tomorrow morning, with Dean in tow. Talk about anachronisms.

DaveInDenver
04-12-2013, 09:49 AM
Says a guy with power windows & in dash navigation. W'all have our toys.

Caribou Sandstorm
04-12-2013, 10:39 AM
So I'm talking on the 145.145 today on my way home. The QSO started out with the Baofeng, but the gentleman with whom I spoke gave me a very weak signal report, so I then switched the HT off and continued the conversation on the mobile rig. To start, I vowed to change the default power on the local repeaters from "low" to "high," which I have just completed.

the other tip I received was a free software called Chirp. check out http://chirp.danplanet.com/projects/chirp/wiki/Home where I also downloaded it. This software appears to be far and away superior to the pseudo-Chinese UV-5R_newold program from Baofeng. For one I can export the file now to .csv, which means I'm a save away from an .xls file, I'll post that here.

the other thing I was able to do was toggle on "dual watch" function, which makes the dual band radio actually behave like a dual band radio, picking up from both channels yet giving priority to the one you're selected to transmit on. I tried to get that working from the menu setting in the radio, and it just wasn't doing it, so happy to force that through the software.

We'll see if I learn any more tricks tomorrow night..

Guessing I can down load this to my 3R also?

nakman
04-12-2013, 10:41 AM
Steve we're doing the grunt work here so once you pass that Technician's test you can just flip it on and press the easy button. There are some fundamentals that you must learn, but the detailed rigors of programming shouldn't be one of them right off the bat, IMO.

My quick soap box is everyone should know how to set a repeater in manually, and how to get to those menu options. You should be able to access the Colorado Connection. And you should be able to read a repeater handbook from a foreign land (like Utah) and dial up & key in on a now local repeater. This ability not only proves your manly geekness, but could ultimately be the difference between just a long day and a much longer extended camping trip, depending on the situation- one of the core benefits that drives so many people to this hobby.

Go rent 127 hours, then imagine if that guy had passed a $14 test, and tossed a $40 radio in his backpack already programmed to the Hanksville repeater, what a difference that would have made for him (maybe even a better movie). Just swap out pinched arm and replace with fried ECU, broken U Joint, kid with allergic reaction, etc. until it feels relevant. Well after tomorrow, at least one of those will be true for you- I stuck the Hanksville & Moab repeaters in the programming. All you need to do is pass a quick test and there's a big world of benefit out there.

nakman
04-12-2013, 10:43 AM
Guessing I can down load this to my 3R also?

yes, the documentation to the Chirp software says it's the same for the 3R and 5R. you can be the first!

timmbuck2
04-12-2013, 11:34 AM
you rock Tim....great points, and thanks in advance for all the hard work! Amazon just dropped off 2 shiny new 5R's! :)

Crash
04-12-2013, 01:40 PM
you rock Tim....great points, and thanks in advance for all the hard work! Amazon just dropped off 2 shiny new 5R's! :)

Tim, what Timm says, and I hear what you are saying about the benefit of a little work now making future trips that much better, safer and fun. My brain can always use more exercise and this will be a good way of getting some.

nakman
04-16-2013, 08:51 PM
Got my UV-3r in the mail today, you guys get yours? At first glance it's a very close approximation to the Yausu VX-3, not exact as it has less buttons, not quite as intuitive, etc. but heck, it's dang close. And it's got a flashlight.

What else is cool is the threads are normal for the antenna, which means my other HT antennas will screw right on. Still not sure why they had to reverse the threads on the UV-5. Also it takes the same charger as the Yaesu, which means one less charger to bring along. It's got a cradle, but it's not a charging dock like the 5, really just a holder, that will also charge the battery if you remove it (like a digital camera battery charger).

I will fire up the laptop and see how the programming goes..

nakman
04-16-2013, 09:46 PM
Well, shoot. My programming cable doesn't fit. :doh: I realize now that I bought the cable for the 5V and 3V "plus," but I only got the 3V radio, not the "plus." Other than the different plug config, I'm not sure the difference between a plus and a non-plus.

So I just ordered another cable, the non-plus cable. In hindsight, I should have got the 3V-r plus, so I could have used the same cable for it and the 5.

daveIT
04-17-2013, 07:20 AM
Dang, these have come down a bit...might need to grab a couple extra to leave in car, work bag, etc. Have to sort out all the "plus" and "5A" stuff though...seems to be multiple versions out there. Is it just firmware or are there added features? I currently have the plain ol' UV-3R and 5Rs (and a Yaesu FT2900R.)

rover67
04-17-2013, 09:04 AM
I got the UV-3R the other night, it seems like it will be a nice little radio for around camp and while wheeling. Due to the low power and my non willingness to figure out repeater programming it's functionality will be limited around town I think. I haven't had a lot of time to play with it yet.

I certainly don't mind a tiny radio for $35 though. It'll be nice to have around.

OilHammer
04-17-2013, 11:26 AM
Well, shoot. My programming cable doesn't fit. :doh: I realize now that I bought the cable for the 5V and 3V "plus," but I only got the 3V radio, not the "plus." Other than the different plug config, I'm not sure the difference between a plus and a non-plus.

So I just ordered another cable, the non-plus cable. In hindsight, I should have got the 3V-r plus, so I could have used the same cable for it and the 5.

I have the Plus Tim. Case design, mic design, battery, and antenna mount are supposedly different. I need to meet up with someone with a 3R to compare them beyond that though.

LARGEONE
04-17-2013, 06:32 PM
Just got my UV-5R Plus

Tim...can you help me get it programmed so I can listen on the trail. Won't have my license for a bit. Test is tonight and I won't make it. Will have to wait until May.

nakman
04-17-2013, 08:29 PM
Just got my UV-5R Plus

Tim...can you help me get it programmed so I can listen on the trail. Won't have my license for a bit. Test is tonight and I won't make it. Will have to wait until May.

Can you do next Saturday night in Northglenn? :D

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Sponsor: Ares D- 27
Location: LDS Church
Time: 8:00 AM (Walk-ins allowed)
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but yeah, I can program you up, lmk

nakman
04-18-2013, 08:27 AM
So far I'm not at all impressed with the UV-3r. I can't get it to transmit or receive, it literally just sits there. I spent 2 hours fiddling with it last night trying to reach another HT 3' away on simplex, to no avail.. .it's like it's already keyed up somehow? And no sound comes out of the speaker, not even in FM radio mode. Tried in VOX mode and without, tried with the headphones and without, tried an "all reset," nothing.

The flashlight works. Once my programming cable comes in I'm hoping that'll kick it into action somehow, I know there are more settings within the software than you can get to through the radio. So far though, pretty unimpressed... anyone else able to send/receive simplex with their UV-3?

rover67
04-18-2013, 08:31 AM
mine worked out of the box.. I simply programmed the simplex freq. I wanted and keyed up and was talking to myself in the truck in no time.

maybe something is wrong with yours?

DaveInDenver
04-18-2013, 08:56 AM
If you did an all reset to defaults, twirling to a frequency and just receiving should be so easy even a mechanical engineer could get it to work.

rover67
04-18-2013, 09:03 AM
Ha! :D

OilHammer
04-18-2013, 10:05 PM
Mine worked out of the box too. I just changed the frequency and baddabing. Even chatted with Marco on it tonight. Range is not super impressive, but it works.
I can also confirm that the Plus is pretty different than the base 3R now that I compared the two side by side.

Fishy
04-18-2013, 10:09 PM
So, do you guys recommend the basic, plus or 5?

nakman
04-18-2013, 10:13 PM
I am liking the functionality of the 5 over the 3, but then again not sure how much I'll use the additional menu items that much. But it's a little more intuitive to navigate the menus on the 5. I'm looking forward to fiddling with a 3+ for a bit...

Haven't messed with the 5+ much, but I think that's what Brad has? We're hooking up on Monday to program his.

daveIT
04-19-2013, 07:16 AM
I'd recommend the UV-5 over the 3R...haven't played with the 3+

OilHammer
04-19-2013, 09:23 AM
I should correct my post. Somehow when Marco and I were chatting, I bumped the dial and changed the frequency ever so slightly. I guess I didn't have it locked down, but it was dark and I was shifting and driving. :)
My guess is that would account for why it got static so quickly. I'll plan a more thorough test of it in Moab. I will say, I've had it ON during the day since Tuesday and the battery is only at half, and that's on the factory charge. Holy smokes!

daveIT
04-20-2013, 08:10 AM
I've found the 3R I found that the battery last quite awhile while monitoring...it's the transmit that kills it. Kind of a moot point though, because the batteries (NP-60) are so cheap that it's easy to have a bunch for backup.

Does the 3+ use the same battery? I'm not sure how battery life compares to the small Yaesu, etc models.

OilHammer
04-21-2013, 08:54 PM
No, completely different battery. The 3R uses a common camera battery, but the plus uses a proprietary battery that's got half the case bonded to it.

daveIT
04-22-2013, 08:38 AM
Ah, like the UV-5R then. Thanks for the info!

Caribou Sandstorm
04-24-2013, 09:58 AM
Testing distance with the 3R yesterday afternoon with Barry.

He was on University and Hampden and I live on Fillmore and Buchtel. I cold hear him really clear and then I added an aftermarket antenna and could hear him on Exposition and Gaylord area..

Pretty good distance and range even with the small OEM antenna. Guessing the range on the 5V would be a bit better by maybe a few miles.

nakman
04-24-2013, 02:21 PM
I must have a bad 3. I got my cable, and was able to upload programming to it, but to no avail it still just sits there unresponsive. I can't get it to transmit or receive on any frequency... just odd.

But hey I also confirmed I can send programming to the UV-5r+, Paul brought his over and no problem at all. Barry hopefully we run into each other this weekend, would be cool to try your 3+, I'll have the cables with me.

nakman
06-04-2013, 03:59 PM
Anyone else need their Baofeng HT juiced up? I am thinking OTB at 6:00- Brad you want to meet before?

daveIT
06-05-2013, 06:49 AM
I broke out my UV-3R yesterday, but it doesn't seem to be working. Not sure if maybe the charger isn't charging the batteries...it shows a constant green light when it's plugged in. I can't remember if the light changes on that one when charging, finished, etc. I'll have to RTFM. I've tried both batteries after letting them charge overnight and when I put them in the radio and try to turn it on, nothing happens.

Another tip...on my 5R, I programmed some El Paso County SAR and a couple other public service channels in and wanted to prevent accidental transmit.

In CHIRP, in the duplex field I selected SPLIT and in the OFFSET field I entered 0.0. If you happen to hit PTT it'll show 000.000 on the display and no RF is generated.

I've been playing so much with my new Kenwood TH-D72A that my Baofengs have been a bit neglected!

nakman
06-05-2013, 08:44 AM
Interesting, sounds a lot like my UV-3r experience. :confused: And I too have been neglecting the Baofengs recently... and couldn't be happier. :) good tip on the accidental transmit- I'd imagine use tones on their end to the same end? never hurts to be double protected though.

Jacket
12-16-2013, 10:20 AM
UV5RA on sale on Amazon for $29.79

http://www.amazon.com/Baofeng-UV5RA-136-174-Dual-Band-Transceiver/dp/B009MAKWC0/ref=lp_8158714011_1_3?s=electronics&ie=UTF8&qid=1387214219&sr=1-3

Sleepy
01-09-2014, 08:31 PM
Has anyone taken a look at this new HT from Baofeng?

http://www.radioddity.com/us/baofeng-gt-3-two-way-radio-dual-band-uhf-vhf-136-174-400-480mhz-2014-latest-version.html

Sounds like a few improvements over the UV-5r.