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treerootCO
02-12-2013, 12:57 PM
Who can enlighten me on the difference between generic and non-generic milk? Both are from plant 8-24 and of Colorado origin. I thought I had it figured out that only the non-generic was rbST free; however, both have the pledge not to treat cows with rbST label. I do find it odd that the regular has a stamp indicating no artificial hormones are added and the generic does not. I assume both are homogenized even though the regular doesn't state that. The agent at the 800 number said generic was for their low income customers and that was the only difference. As of 12/2, the current market price is $3.19 for regular and $1.99 for generic.

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Shark Bait
02-12-2013, 01:02 PM
You now have a lot of milk to drink! :eek::D

Uncle Ben
02-12-2013, 01:13 PM
Generic refers to packaging only. Apparently the addition of color ink jumps the price by a heavy buck!

treerootCO
02-12-2013, 01:27 PM
There is no discernible taste difference. The generic is on the left and the regular is on the right.

31998

subzali
02-12-2013, 02:05 PM
What are you Napoleon Dynamite in an FFA competition?






:lmao:

treerootCO
02-12-2013, 02:12 PM
What are you Napoleon Dynamite in an FFA competition?






:lmao:

31999

I could drink whole if I wanted to :(

smslavin
02-12-2013, 02:13 PM
did you know that humans are the only mammal to continue drinking milk after we no longer need it? kinda makes you wonder...

subzali
02-12-2013, 02:18 PM
31999

I could drink whole if I wanted to :(

I was actually thinking about this one but no youtube videos were to be found...:(

Napoleon Dynamite: (drinks a glass of milk) The defect in that one is bleach.
FFA Judge No. 1 That's right.
Napoleon Dynamite Yes!
Napoleon Dynamite (drinks another glass of milk) This tastes like the cow got into an onion patch.
FFA Judge No. 2 Correct!
Napoleon Dynamite Yes!!.

did you know that humans are the only mammal to continue drinking milk after we no longer need it? kinda makes you wonder...

I've thought about that too. Actually had a discussion with the wife about that a couple nights ago...

smslavin
02-12-2013, 02:25 PM
Napoleon Dynamite kicks all kinds of ass. :thumb:

I've thought about that too. Actually had a discussion with the wife about that a couple nights ago...

We totally cut it out a couple of years ago. Watching Food Inc just reinforced the decision. The :Princess:'s don't miss it and have gotten most of their friends hooked on almond milk.

Sorry for the tangent. :)

Uncle Ben
02-12-2013, 04:55 PM
Quit playing with your milk and get to work in the garage...slacker! :rant: :p:

066wally
02-12-2013, 10:26 PM
Generic milk comes from black and white cows.

Corbet
02-12-2013, 11:14 PM
I just wish milk was that cheap in Durango. We buy generic for myself and M. Bridger gets the organic stuff probably for no real reason other than it makes us feel good.

Jacket
02-13-2013, 09:38 AM
I just wish milk was that cheap in Durango. We buy generic for myself and M. Bridger gets the organic stuff probably for no real reason other than it makes us feel good.

It'll help to prevent Bridger from starting puberty at age 9. :eek:

RockRunner
02-13-2013, 10:06 AM
Same stuff just drink it and safe money

PabloCruise
02-13-2013, 12:32 PM
did you know that humans are the only mammal to continue drinking milk after we no longer need it? kinda makes you wonder...

I think that is based entirely on access.
If my Maine **** cat could walk into King Soopers and throw down for a gallon of milk, he would be outside their doors waiting for them to open every morning (even they the sign says "24 Hour Savings").
That kitty drinks a lot of milk!

PabloCruise
02-13-2013, 12:33 PM
I think that is based entirely on access.
If my Maine **** cat could walk into King Soopers and throw down for a gallon of milk, he would be outside their doors waiting for them to open every morning (even they the sign says "24 Hour Savings").
That kitty drinks a lot of milk!

Funny that the forum replaces the last 4 letters of the word "racoon" with "****" :D

nuclearlemon
02-13-2013, 12:40 PM
Funny that the forum replaces the last 4 letters of the word "racoon" with "****" :D

more of the way too pc world we live in:rolleyes:

nakman
02-13-2013, 01:29 PM
**** ** *** *** *** ** ***** ** **** **:rolleyes:

what?? sorry, I think I've got mine turned up too high..

As for milk, we get ours delivered. Agreed on the hormone comments, and watching Food Inc. is enough to really startle you. Just wish organic wasn't so synonymous with smaller, more expensive, and more perishable.

rover67
02-13-2013, 01:34 PM
does organic even mean anything anymore?

Corbet
02-13-2013, 01:44 PM
does organic even mean anything anymore?

Yes Tim just defined it for us.

smaller, more expensive, and more perishable.

akingf5371
02-13-2013, 01:48 PM
what?? sorry, I think I've got mine turned up too high..

As for milk, we get ours delivered. Agreed on the hormone comments, and watching Food Inc. is enough to really startle you. Just wish organic wasn't so synonymous with smaller, more expensive, and more perishable.

For what it's worth a lot of organic milk dairies have to ultra pasteurize their milk due to scarcity of distribution centers. To quote a website:

Two types of pasteurization processes are practiced in the United States. The first, traditional pasteurization, heats the milk to at least 165°F for 15 seconds. This is commonly referred to as "High Temperature, Short Time," or HTST pasteurization. Heating the milk removes 99.9% of the bacteria in the milk, which gives HTST milk a printed shelf life of 16 - 21 days from the date it was packaged.

Ultra pasteurization, the most widely used pasteurization process for milk in Europe and throughout the world, is a more recently developed process. The ultra pasteurization process is often referred to as “Ultra High Temperature,” or UHT pasteurization. The UHT process heats the milk to 280° F for only two seconds, and eliminates a larger percentage of bacteria than HTST pasteurization.

So, most of the organic milk I've seen in the grocery store, unless from a local dairy has been UHT, and stays fresher longer.

DaveInDenver
02-13-2013, 04:40 PM
does organic even mean anything anymore?
In general it is the only label that has any meaning. Natural, pure, etc. are undefined beyond what the supplier agrees it means. Often products can be as good or better than the USDA. It requires a lot of paperwork to stay compliant so smaller firms often don't pursue it simply because of the red tape. To carry an 'organic' label according to the USDA requires that pesticides, herbicides, hormones, ionizing radiation and GMO are not used. Some companies do things differently than the USDA requires and won't carry the term 'organic' but do fulfill other certifications, such as the Non-GMO Project, that might be a better choice and actually be pretty much otherwise organic and just can't say so legally.

There is some question with respect to GMO because 95% of the corn grown in this country is genetically modified, so even if the strain used was supposed to be heirloom or non-GMO, it's almost certain to have been contaminated at some point. This is one place where the USDA organic might not be as good as a Non-GMO Verified label. The Non-GMO is likely to actually have a lower percentage or zero contamination. To do this the company will reduce or eliminate corn (and soy BTW) completely.

The USDA just says producers must attempt to avoid GMO contact via process and not fall below 70% organic for multiple ingredients, so if 30% of the product is GMO corn and the producer otherwise follows the requirements it could still be called organic. But specifically testing for the absence of GMO is what the Non-GMO project requires even if some other non-organic process happens.

We get our milk directly from the dairy, we're cow share owners at Windsor Dairy. That is a whole different situation, though.

subzali
02-13-2013, 04:47 PM
Dave, what do you not know about? ;)

DaveInDenver
02-13-2013, 05:11 PM
Dave, what do you not know about? ;)
A lot I don't know. I just happen to have read about all of this since we've started up a small farm. A very, very small 1 acre farm, White Rose Farm, LLC. Plus over the past few years we've taken a lot more care in what we eat.

subzali
02-13-2013, 05:18 PM
A lot I don't know. I just happen to have read about all of this since we've started up a small farm. A very, very small 1 acre farm, White Rose Farm, LLC. Plus over the past few years we've taken a lot more care in what we eat.

Oh yeah I forgot about that. Hope that venture is going well! :cool:

wesintl
02-13-2013, 05:28 PM
generic comes from any cow. non generic comes Holstein, Guernsey, Brown Swiss etc. ;)