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rover67
01-06-2014, 10:50 AM
Howdy folks!

We pulled up some carpet at our place and found decent wood floors so were gonna refinish them. Any experience here with that? I was thinking about tackling it with a hand held belt sander instead of renting a big drum sander... Is that a bad idea? It's a small room.... Only about 9' x 8'.

Then I am assuming a clear polyurethane with some polish on top??

http://img.tapatalk.com/d/14/01/07/a6u6yhez.jpg

http://img.tapatalk.com/d/14/01/07/4a4y6ypu.jpg

http://img.tapatalk.com/d/14/01/07/etahyzan.jpg

rover67
01-06-2014, 10:58 AM
i was thinking something like this:

http://www.lowes.com/pd_76366-70-352VS_0__?productId=1209509&Ntt=belt+sander&pl=1&currentURL=%3FNtt%3Dbelt%2Bsander&facetInfo=

DaveInDenver
01-06-2014, 11:40 AM
Rent the floor sander. You'll leave a wavy surface with a hand sander. Otherwise, it ain't rocket surgery. Sure, there's a small possibility you'll screw it up but it's a small room and you gotta learn some how.

Pull or set any high nails, fill large holes or gaps, light sand, stain (if you wish), seal, light sand, seal, wait, light sand, wait, seal done. I'd pull off the baseboards to prevent them from being dinged and plus you can then sand all the way to the wall and cover the edges when you're done. Might take a weekend on account of the waiting between coats.

You'd need a hand or disc sander for inside of the closet(s) if you have them. You are welcome to borrow my cheap old belt sander if you don't want to buy one, but the floor sander is worth renting I thought. I also have a random orbit sander for the edges and corners if you need it.

You probably don't need to take off much material unless you want zero hint of the current color, so you're really looking for a floor polisher/buffer and not a sander. The first pass is with a mildly aggressive screen at most then the intermediate passes are with fine grit (essentially like a Scotchbrite).

Oh, do start in the middle of the room the first time you turn on the sander so you don't put a hole in a wall... Don't ask.

AHorseThief
01-06-2014, 11:53 AM
Even with that small of a room, I'd think about renting an orbital floor sander. You're going to end up sanding that 9' x 8' area at least 5 times. My knees liked sanding standing up. The orbitals are way more forgiving than the drum sanders.

The big keys are to keep everything clean in the room, and mask off the room from the rest of the house as best as you can. Then keep your sanding even.

We used the Varathane water based sealer. It goes on easy and has held up really well.

Keith
01-06-2014, 12:06 PM
I also have a random orbit sander you can borrow for areas the big sander can't get to. I would definitely rent a standing disc sander... But I can totally see you getting it done with a belt sander.

60wag
01-06-2014, 12:18 PM
Any chance you will be doing the rest of the house in the future? If the rest of the place has the oak flooring in place, you might want to get a bid from a pro company. The finish they use is much better than any polyurethane I've found in a can.

It's a pain to prep the whole house for the job but the results make it well worth it.

MDH33
01-06-2014, 12:19 PM
I wouldn't do it with a belt sander. Those can leave some serious grooves and are pretty aggressive. Either rent the floor sander or hire someone. If it was me, I would just hire a pro. They could be in and out in short order and you'd be done with no mess to deal with.

PhatFJ
01-06-2014, 12:41 PM
Oh, do start in the middle of the room the first time you turn on the sander so you don't put a hole in a wall... Don't ask. :lmao:

Marco, we just moved into a 1917 victorian and refinished our maple floors. Well, to make a long story shorter, do not use a belt sander! You will be very disappointed the results! I bought a Silverline drum sander with all stages of paper, an Alto edge sander and a Clarke orbital sander as I will be refinishing lots of flooring. Refinishing floors is an art and it takes practice to do it right but there is no reason not to give it a try as long as you know you can live with the results. The proper equipment makes all the difference in the world.. I don't know what your timing is, but I will be coming to Denver in the next few weeks and would be happy to let you borrow these units if you will just pay for the supplies you use.. I used an oil based Poly and they turned out fantastic..
:thumb:
Let me know,
Brian

Caribou Sandstorm
01-06-2014, 01:07 PM
Any chance you will be doing the rest of the house in the future? If the rest of the place has the oak flooring in place, you might want to get a bid from a pro company. The finish they use is much better than any polyurethane I've found in a can.

It's a pain to prep the whole house for the job but the results make it well worth it.

x2 if you can do the whole place at once it looks fantastic.

Jacket
01-06-2014, 01:22 PM
I agree with everyone else regarding the floor sander for consistency. The only other thing I'll mention is doing it on a warm day so that it'll dry a bit faster and you can open windows to air the place out. The polyurethane will stink pretty bad.

wesintl
01-06-2014, 01:30 PM
find local kid in karate training.. sand the floor. :D

simps80
01-06-2014, 04:03 PM
x2 if you can do the whole place at once it looks fantastic.

x3
with older floors the larger the canvas the less 'mistakes' look like mistakes.

Corbet
01-06-2014, 05:02 PM
Rent the sander

wesintl
01-06-2014, 05:23 PM
Normally i'm a do it yourselfer but i found 2 guys that refinished our floor for a price it wasn't worth my time, renting the equip, or the learning curve. I'll see if I have their card somewhere.

smslavin
01-06-2014, 06:20 PM
find local kid in karate training.. sand the floor. :D

http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-BP2dPgo36_w/T1Trj_6Wd6I/AAAAAAAAH2I/v6r8tkF9DAE/s1600/wax%2Bon%2Bwax%2Boff.jpg

rover67
01-06-2014, 11:19 PM
wow thanks for all the input you guys, I am now thinking either rent the sander or just get somebody to work the whole house when we are done with the kitchen.

If we could find a karate kid that'd probably be the easiest solution :)

Corbet
01-07-2014, 04:37 PM
If your looking at the whole house now just pay the guy. Its like drywall IMO. Yes I can do it, but I sure don't want to.

LARGEONE
01-08-2014, 04:22 PM
If your looking at the whole house now just pay the guy. Its like drywall IMO. Yes I can do it, but I sure don't want to.

Corbet...I'm with you. I swore I would never sand drywall again...unless its just a hole my kid puts through it, and even then I might pay someone! I helped my brother do all his hardwood floors back in KY. I won't do that again either!!!

rover67
01-08-2014, 04:43 PM
Rented a big a$$ orbital and went for it. 5 hrs later 1st coat of poly down and it looks pretty good.
BUT, now i kinda want to just do the whole house....

Jenny Cruiser
01-08-2014, 06:10 PM
Do it!:)

RockRunner
01-08-2014, 06:54 PM
Do it Marco you won't be disappointed. I do this for a living and Jeremy can attest that you want a big sander, did his floor matching old to new and can't tell. Once you are ready to apply the finish LMK there are some real good products out there that you can apply yourself. Just like painting a car it is an art too, takes a steady hand and feel for the product.

If you have any questions call me.

rover67
01-09-2014, 11:19 PM
http://img.tapatalk.com/d/14/01/10/9eheju5a.jpg

http://img.tapatalk.com/d/14/01/10/evenahu7.jpg

http://img.tapatalk.com/d/14/01/10/4y4umaza.jpg

I think they turned out ok.

Also, I think when we pull the rest of the carpet up we might just get it all done pro as suggested... Well see. Total time invested was 6 hrs and about $120 in rental and materials.

farnhamstj
01-10-2014, 08:38 PM
looks good to me. nice work.

Woodsman
01-10-2014, 10:24 PM
They look great and much, much better than the before shots that is for certain !

Even as a professional woodworker, I elected to have my floors professionally refinished last year. Two man team with heavy drum sander and edge sander. They did a great job and applied three coats. Two left the grain a little "hungry". Like anything else it is the details that make the difference . . . specifically the time spent sanding between coats and wiping/vacuuming the dust before applying the next coat.

I had originally planned to do it myself with the orbital rental unit, but my oak floor was stained cherry and I wanted the cherry color gone. Cherry stain on oak is just wrong. I was told that to sand the stain away the big dog drum sander with a pro operator would be the ticket. Now that the stain is gone, if it needs refinished down the road I'll probably do it with an orbital sander.