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View Full Version : Cutting the cord!


akingf5371
05-22-2014, 11:17 AM
I recently canceled my Xfinity cable subscription. We didn't really use it much, and I really only enjoyed 2-3 shows that were on the air this year. Outside of sports (which being from the south I have to go to a Bar to see normally) I don't see too many downsides. I wanted to talk logistics with a few people though, has anyone else done this? I want to be able to watch downloaded content on my tv without directly hooking up my laptop. What I'm thinking is chromecast on the tv(s) with a chromebook using a wireless harddrive for movie streaming. Thoughts?

aprosise
05-22-2014, 11:25 AM
Get a chromecast! They are awesome. Stream Netflix from your Phone, iPad, and Laptop while still being able to surf Rising Sun!

treerootCO
05-22-2014, 11:45 AM
I am interested as well but would like to know the free ones (or how much the others are if reasonable). YouTube has a ton of free shows now and I was surprised to see 4K content as well.

calphi27
05-22-2014, 11:50 AM
We cut the cord 2+ years ago. Still have high speed & stream netflix via apple tv. We also bought a $30 antenna from best buy for the local stations. I don't miss regular tv AT ALL.

MTSN
05-22-2014, 12:18 PM
I have a Samsung smart tv connected directly to my router, and I have no cable or dish. I have a small HD antenna that I use to watch sports, and it works perfect and is invisible. I don't get all the channels sometimes, but if I pull it out of the cabinet and use a suction cup to put it on the window I can get 50+ over the air channels. I only do that temporarily of course, but you could easily find a way to permanently mount one (outdoors is ideal). I live in a condo building, so I don't want to put anything outside my unit. I watch Netflix, HuluPlus, and youtube for basically all my entertainment needs which I find to be MORE than enough. I'm shocked how much cool content there is on youtube, and when I have friends over we pass around the keyboard to pull up funny/cool videos which is pretty entertaining!

I pay roughly $55 a month for my internet and subscriptions which is down from around $150 a month in the past when I had cable. It's pretty easy math to show the savings in the long run. In fact just one year of savings is enough to buy a pretty decent smart tv! Here's a picture of my setup while using the HD antenna. It shows how good the picture is in even locked inside the cabinet!

Corbet
05-22-2014, 12:20 PM
I think we are going to do the same for the summer. But come football season I got to have my Direct Ticket back :)

hard to save money by going to the bar to watch them after food and drinks.

Keith
05-22-2014, 12:20 PM
Haven't had cable in... I can't even remember. We are heavily invested in the Apple ecosystem, so use a Apple TV for Netflix, iTunes movies and shows, and streaming music from phones or computers. Works great. Haven't ever missed cable.

akingf5371
05-22-2014, 12:35 PM
We cut the cord 2+ years ago. Still have high speed & stream netflix via apple tv. We also bought a $30 antenna from best buy for the local stations. I don't miss regular tv AT ALL.

Trying to avoid Apple TV due to not having any apple devices (Besides the GF's iPhone) I want to be able to play downloaded content, not just stream which is the kicker


I have a Samsung smart tv connected directly to my router, and I have no cable or dish. I have a small HD antenna that I use to watch sports, and it works perfect and is invisible. I don't get all the channels sometimes, but if I pull it out of the cabinet and use a suction cup to put it on the window I can get 50+ over the air channels. I only do that temporarily of course, but you could easily find a way to permanently mount one (outdoors is ideal). I live in a condo building, so I don't want to put anything outside my unit. I watch Netflix, HuluPlus, and youtube for basically all my entertainment needs which I find to be MORE than enough. I'm shocked how much cool content there is on youtube, and when I have friends over we pass around the keyboard to pull up funny/cool videos which is pretty entertaining!

I pay roughly $55 a month for my internet and subscriptions which is down from around $150 a month in the past when I had cable. It's pretty easy math to show the savings in the long run. In fact just one year of savings is enough to buy a pretty decent smart tv! Here's a picture of my setup while using the HD antenna. It shows how good the picture is in even locked inside the cabinet!

Very nice! I'm trying to avoid buying a new TV ( I have an older Visio I bought one summer in College) and the built in firm-ware leaves a little to be desired as far as UI and updates.

I think we are going to do the same for the summer. But come football season I got to have my Direct Ticket back :)

hard to save money by going to the bar to watch them after food and drinks.
This is my issues as well, but I'll cross that road when I get there.


Haven't had cable in... I can't even remember. We are heavily invested in the Apple ecosystem, so use a Apple TV for Netflix, iTunes movies and shows, and streaming music from phones or computers. Works great. Haven't ever missed cable.

Apple TV is a great option, but to my knowledge you can't watch anything you dont' buy on iTunes, which is 99.9% of my collection

DenCo40
05-22-2014, 12:53 PM
We cut the cord a few months ago. I really like the costs savings. I was a little nervous at first about missing some of my favorite shows but now not having it I have noticed I don't miss it at the least bit. In fact I like it much more. Broudcast tv has plenty to offer and the picture quality is great.We still have internet with netflix and chromecast so I can still watch just about anything I want to watch. I wish that I would've cut the cord sooner!

Blindranger
05-22-2014, 12:55 PM
I havent had "TV" in nearly a decade. We stream pretty much everything we want to watch on our iMac, tablets, phones, etc through Netflix and Amazon Prime. I also take advantage of grabbing torrents of my favorite shows within an hour or so of them playing live. Going the torrent route also gets you access to the best British and Australian programing. check out Transmission for handle Torrents.


been grabing all of my TV content via torrent

Jacket
05-22-2014, 01:02 PM
Outside of sports (which being from the south I have to go to a Bar to see normally) I don't see too many downsides.

This is the only gotcha from my perspective as well, otherwise its a no-brainer. I grew up in the South too, so come September my brain is pre-programmed to require an influx of college football games.

This thread also has some good info about cutting out cable. (http://www.risingsun4x4club.org/forum2/showthread.php?t=14244)

DanInDenver
05-22-2014, 01:21 PM
For those of you streaming and downloading what are your download upload speeds and cost? Are you doing all of this over WIFI?

I am paying Centurylink $30 a month for ~ 20 down/ 896 up.

I too would like to cut the cord "257 channels and there is nothing on".

DaveInDenver
05-22-2014, 01:46 PM
Stopped paying for TV many years ago, probably around 2007 or so.

At the old house we had a 40Mbps/5Mbps Qwest DSL but up here our neighborhood can't get more than 7Mbps via Centurylink, so we have Comcast cable Internet, 30Mbps/5Mbps at the moment. We pay about $80 a month but that's for business class because when we set it up she was working at home full time. Now that she's got an office I suppose we could go to residential cable Internet, but having one period of about 3 hours when it was out in the last 2 years I'm in no hurry to change it.

We use a Roku box to transverse the Internet-TV link via 2.4GHz WiFi. It has no trouble keeping up with any stream including HD. This handles Netflix, Amazon Prime, Crackle and Hulu. We have an antenna on the roof for local stations.

The only thing I haven't been able to get it to do is stream directly from the Internet, so no live TV or anything. There's probably a way to hack it but in stock form it can't get directly to the web, there's no browser built-in or a 3rd party application that I can find.

So I use an old XP laptop that I connect to with remote desktop. It works but is kind of clunky.

If I was starting fresh I would personally skip the Roku, Apple TV or Chromecast and just build a dedicated Linux streaming box to run the TV. It could serve not only anything from the web with a real browser but could also be a media storage so that music and movies wouldn't consume WiFi bandwidth and it could also be a DVR.

For non-Broncos football, it's the local bar. Since I want to watch the Buffs and they are /never/ on broadcast TV that's not a difficult habit to get into. We usually hit one of our many microbreweries and since they don't serve food they don't mind us bringing food. Everyone shares their salsa and pretzels, anyway.

akingf5371
05-22-2014, 03:18 PM
Stopped paying for TV many years ago, probably around 2007 or so.

At the old house we had a 40Mbps/5Mbps Qwest DSL but up here our neighborhood can't get more than 7Mbps via Centurylink, so we have Comcast cable Internet, 30Mbps/5Mbps at the moment. We pay about $80 a month but that's for business class because when we set it up she was working at home full time. Now that she's got an office I suppose we could go to residential cable Internet, but having one period of about 3 hours when it was out in the last 2 years I'm in no hurry to change it.

We use a Roku box to transverse the Internet-TV link via 2.4GHz WiFi. It has no trouble keeping up with any stream including HD. This handles Netflix, Amazon Prime, Crackle and Hulu. We have an antenna on the roof for local stations.

The only thing I haven't been able to get it to do is stream directly from the Internet, so no live TV or anything. There's probably a way to hack it but in stock form it can't get directly to the web, there's no browser built-in or a 3rd party application that I can find.

So I use an old XP laptop that I connect to with remote desktop. It works but is kind of clunky.

If I was starting fresh I would personally skip the Roku, Apple TV or Chromecast and just build a dedicated Linux streaming box to run the TV. It could serve not only anything from the web with a real browser but could also be a media storage so that music and movies wouldn't consume WiFi bandwidth and it could also be a DVR.

For non-Broncos football, it's the local bar. Since I want to watch the Buffs and they are /never/ on broadcast TV that's not a difficult habit to get into. We usually hit one of our many microbreweries and since they don't serve food they don't mind us bringing food. Everyone shares their salsa and pretzels, anyway.

I thought about building a dedicated computer (linux or otherwise) into each TV as well, but there are a few issues there. 1) I dont' want to have to build 2x computers and the cost is prohibitive. I can get 2x chrome books, and 2x chrome casts for each part of my house and still come out ahead. Then I could watch TV in bed or garage or whatever as well.

Hulk
05-22-2014, 03:25 PM
I have the Roku3 and an old Boxee Box. I use them both all the time. The Roku3 works great for all the streaming content. The Boxee Box will play virtually any downloaded content in any format which is why I still use it.

DaveInDenver
05-22-2014, 03:30 PM
I thought about building a dedicated computer (linux or otherwise) into each TV as well, but there are a few issues there. 1) I dont' want to have to build 2x computers and the cost is prohibitive. I can get 2x chrome books, and 2x chrome casts for each part of my house and still come out ahead. Then I could watch TV in bed or garage or whatever as well.
Understandable. We have just one TV so we don't have this problem. :-) One thing you notice is that when you don't have cable/satellite you start to realize that since there's nothing on there's no point to bothering with the idiot box in the first place. We spend more time cracking books and doing actually productive stuff... Some newer TV can get on your WiFi without any additional hardware so maybe they can see whatever box you build natively and maybe get onto the Internet as well? That might remove some of the need to build boxes for each TV.

MTSN
05-22-2014, 04:21 PM
For those of you streaming and downloading what are your download upload speeds and cost? Are you doing all of this over WIFI?

I am paying Centurylink $30 a month for ~ 20 down/ 896 up.

I too would like to cut the cord "257 channels and there is nothing on".

This is my exact setup with Century like - same plan same cost same speeds. I can stream 1080p movies all day long with no lag or no problems. I don't connect over wifi however I use a direct connection to the back of the tv, but I doubt I'd have a problem using a wifi connection.

akingf5371
05-23-2014, 09:11 AM
Good points made here. I'll will keep you updated with what I end up doing!

Rezarf
05-23-2014, 12:13 PM
We've been done with Cable for 3 years. Netflix, and Apple TV and we have plenty of things to waste time watching.

akingf5371
05-30-2014, 09:44 AM
So, I got chromecast installed on the TV in the upstairs part of the house. It is an older tube tv so I had to buy an adapter (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B008FO7PQA/ref=oh_details_o00_s00_i00?ie=UTF8&psc=1) I know $31 is a little expensive for an old TV, but it's cheaper than buying a new one!. It works great! I had a little issue with wi-fi strength as the modem/router is downstairs, but once I moved it closer to the floor it worked fine. I'm still going to go the chrome/windows book and wireless harddrive for downloaded content, I just need to find a player that chromecasts.