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Red_Chili
10-20-2006, 11:24 AM
So I have a branny new garage floor, and I want to keep a clean shop (for once...).

Advice on garage floor sealers and finishes? One-part epoxy, two-part epoxy... tons of brands and some horror stories from what I see. How expensive is it to contract that out? (I'm thinking, way more than DIY, as usual).

Any club members do that sort of thing as a side biz?

CardinalFJ60
10-20-2006, 11:57 AM
I did that many years ago with my Dad for my Grandparents garage. They are out in Buffalo, NY. What we ran into was ground moisture wrecking the coating from underneath. That is, it began to peel and bubble pretty quickly.

I'm sure the products have improved since then, and we did prep the floor properly...etc

One trick I heard was to duct tape a piece of a garbage bag to the floor, let it sit for a couple days...see if moisture seeps up and discolors the concrete. We probably don't have as much of an issue here as in NY. Just a thought as you're moving toward sealing the floor.

Red_Chili
10-20-2006, 01:06 PM
I have seen that trick too. Our soil is pretty sandy and drains exceptionally well, so I'm hoping...

Red_Chili
10-20-2006, 02:35 PM
More questions in addition: I'm hearing that 3-4 weeks is not enough time for the concrete to have cured, and that doing it this time of year is iffy due to the cold. True?

I was really hoping to not have to pull out everything while I coat the floor... :( That's why I wanted to gitterdun before I move in.

I guess I could do 1/2 at a time, next spring...

ScaldedDog
10-21-2006, 09:40 AM
This site needs one of those This Thread is Worthless Without Pics smilies that CO4x4.org has. I wanna see that new garage!!

Mark

Tch2fly
10-21-2006, 05:15 PM
After reading and hearing about the problems people were having with owner applied epoxy floors I went the pro route in my new garage. I had them do a textured finish to limit slipping and they also did the base of tha walls where the concrete meets the drywall. It was about $2000 but it has a 5 year warranty. It has proven very durable and chip resistant, oil/grease spills are a breeze to clean and it is nice to be able to hose out the mess after all the mud flakes off from 4 wheel'n. This is the only pic I have

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v108/livnletdie/snow003.jpg

Red_Chili
10-23-2006, 09:28 AM
Mark, you'll just have to drive by!!!

I *think* your double-wide will still skinny down the alley...

Tch, thanks for the suggestion. $2K is a bit out of my range, that sure does look sweet though.

wesintl
10-23-2006, 09:45 AM
sherwin williams tile clade. Do it right.

if you have to do a sealer it's schofield concrete sealer 3 coats with the 3rd being shark grip

HTH

ScaldedDog
10-23-2006, 11:12 PM
Mark, you'll just have to drive by!!!

Are you guys in the house? My "double-wide" (you knew I was from WV, didn't you? :hill: ) is stored for the winter, but I'm sure the Taurus will fit.:D

Mark

Red_Chili
10-24-2006, 08:04 AM
Not quite just yet. I'm there most afternoons and evenings (this week excepted). The first-ish of November we will be in. Our lease on the rental is done on Nov. 30, so we will CERTAINLY be in by then!!

Tch2fly
10-24-2006, 10:03 AM
Mark, you'll just have to drive by!!!

I *think* your double-wide will still skinny down the alley...

Tch, thanks for the suggestion. $2K is a bit out of my range, that sure does look sweet though.


I understand....it was an unusual set of circumstances that led to my being able to justify the expense.

I did talk at length with the guys who did it and the key to any install is the prep. They didn't use any sort of special epoxy but they did several days of prep prior to the coating and I was able to stay off of it a week longer than they requested. As I understand the worst thing you can do is rush getting back onto the new surface and park on it with hot tires. It can cause the coating to peel.

Good luck:cheers:

Red_Chili
10-25-2006, 09:38 AM
I heard from a former coworker who does garage floor coatings as a sideline. Two-coat sealing by him will run over $700. Hmmm, how bad do I really want this?

I guess I have environmental reasons to procrastinate. The floor is 4 weeks old, and the garage is not heated.

Shark Bait
10-25-2006, 10:05 AM
I used the stuff you get at Home Depot and have been pretty happy with it. The paint does start to peel up after a while under where your tires go, due to them being hot when you pull into your garage. My father-in-law's trick to deal with that is to mask off the area where the tire track will be and not paint it.

HTH

SteveH
12-09-2013, 11:04 PM
Thread revival!

How does these coatings hold up to metal jacks and engine hoists being dragged around on them? I use my floor pretty hard!

Steve

ScaldedDog
12-10-2013, 06:04 PM
The answers to all garage floor questions can be found on The Garage Journal (http://www.garagejournal.com/forum/forumdisplay.php?f=20). I'm not a huge fan of epoxy coatings for working shops.

Mark

Woodsman
12-10-2013, 07:35 PM
Many people try to skip the job of acid etching the concrete with muriatic acid prior to application of the coating. Just like sanding metal or previously coated surfaces before painting, you need to etch the concrete for a good bond.

Inukshuk
12-10-2013, 08:17 PM
The standard easy moisture test is a piece of clear plastic taped down for a few days. If you see moisture, its too wet, A new home may dry out, and old one is probably as dry as it will get.

I did the one-part stuff from home dept and acid etched. 6-8 years ago maybe. Has come off in some places but held up remarkably well.

SteveH
12-10-2013, 11:27 PM
Good link to the Garage Journal - thanks. No real easy answers for how to keep a floor cleanable, if you're a gear head.

teamextreme
12-11-2013, 02:04 AM
Yup, Garage Journal has more info on this subject that you can hope to absorb, and you can also follow along with Marc's garage tile project :)

I'm starting my own epoxy job in my new garage as soon as it warms up enough. I was going to do it last weekend but the weather and a missed epoxy shipment screwed me. Should be warm enough by the weekend to get it done (along with a heater).

Brucker
12-11-2013, 02:43 AM
I have tried quite a few different coatings over cement floors. Best I have found is Armor Seal. It is a two part epoxy. Here is a link: http://protective.sherwin-williams.com/detail.jsp?A=sku-26303%3Aproduct-6878 It is VERY pricey, but WELL worth it.

I did this in my current shop about 7 years ago before I moved in. And it is still holding up well. As others have stated, proper prep is key. I power washed, then scrubbed entire area with muriatic acid, then rinsed clean, and then did 2 heavy coats.

I expected I would need to refinish the floors every one to two years based off other floors I had done and the nature of my work, but I haven't had to touch it. Direct heat will burn it, and it will flake up where previous oil stains were if the area isn't prepped perfect, but holds up awesome to the majority of scratches, hot tires, chemicals, and other abuses it sees. Spills easily wipe up and don't soak in, and general cleaning is fast and easy with a broom then quick mopping.

SteveH
12-11-2013, 12:42 PM
Called Sherwin Williams - ArmorSeal 1000 is $109/gal x 2 (1 gal. each of base and hardener). Covers 500 square feet. When summer rolls around, I may try this out.

Brucker
12-11-2013, 02:01 PM
Called Sherwin Williams - ArmorSeal 1000 is $109/gal x 2 (1 gal. each of base and hardener). Covers 500 square feet. When summer rolls around, I may try this out.

Sounds about right, though that is 500 sqft once. Really need multiple coats. 2 minimum with dry time in between. Took me about 6 gal of each to do just under 1700 sqft. with two coats. With all other supplies needed (cleaners, muriatic acid, respirators, rollers, trays, etc) I was in it about $1200-1500 when all was said and done. But it was truly one of the best improvements I have done yet to the shop.

Tramontana
12-12-2013, 10:17 PM
I'm starting my own epoxy job in my new garage as soon as it warms up enough. I was going to do it last weekend but the weather and a missed epoxy shipment screwed me. Should be warm enough by the weekend to get it done (along with a heater).

...watch what type of heater you choose for this! Most (if not all) epoxy coatings will "flash off" very volatile organic compound vapors.

DO NOT USE a flame based space heater!!!

Also, if you happen to have heating equipment or gas fired water heating equipment within the space, you will want to turn these completely off so that there is no chance of a pilot light or electronic ignition lighting off these vapors.

I've installed Sherwin Williams Armor Coat in two different garages and in a portion of my (now) finished basement. The fumes will collect and become overwhelming in an enclosed environment. You need a certain amount of fresh air, and the protection from any ignition source when installing this type of project. Don't become a statistic.

Cheers and good luck with the project. :cheers:

SteveH
12-13-2013, 01:10 PM
The SW paint guy told me to thin the first coat slightly, so it soaks in. They sell a special thinner for this product.

David (Tramontana) - were you happy with the durability of the Armor Coat?

Brucker
12-13-2013, 01:33 PM
The SW paint guy told me to thin the first coat slightly, so it soaks in. They sell a special thinner for this product.



Interesting. Wasn't even mentioned or, I assume, available when I did it as it isn't on the original product sheet I have for them. But if it helps. I would do it in a heart beat. I am amazed at how well the flooring has held up without using a thinner with the first coat, and not even sure if it could hold up any better.

74fj40
12-13-2013, 02:24 PM
I say tile it! Go big.

Tramontana
12-14-2013, 09:17 PM
David (Tramontana) - were you happy with the durability of the Armor Coat?

...yes I've been happy with it, but it is not a "perfect" solution.

It can scratch off if abused. I don't typically park in the garage, so it hasn't been heavily tested for hot wheel pick up, or severe mechanical abuse. It has served for motorcycle maintenance/repair work and general wood working but no heavy jacks, grinding, welding etc.

It does clean up well, and can be touched up as needed.

I put this in our basement "hobby room" and have had one small place that the epoxy has failed by spalling/blistering up, but this seems to be likely due to extreme moisture drive through the floor slab or perhaps a spot that did not get prepared perfectly?

Cheers! :thumb: