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Uncle Ben
02-08-2007, 10:29 PM
Just a check on who in the club is into making thier own barley pop?
My sweet wife and kids set me up for my birthday with a very deluxe setup. Tonight I just cooked up my first batch. I enjoyed the process very much! Gotta add the yeast when it cools another 10* and then the wait will be on! :thumb: PS....house smells great! ;)

Hulk
02-08-2007, 10:51 PM
I've brewed a couple of batches. It's fun, and the best part is enjoying the results! I quickly found that the 24 oz bottles were a good investment, since I always shared anyway, and they were easier to clean. Cheers!

bh4rnnr
02-08-2007, 10:58 PM
Just a check on who in the club is into making thier own barley pop?
My sweet wife and kids set me up for my birthday with a very deluxe setup. Tonight I just cooked up my first batch. I enjoyed the process very much! Gotta add the yeast when it cools another 10* and then the wait will be on! :thumb: PS....house smells great! ;)


Ah ha!! So that's why you had me drink all that beer. Gave you empty beer botles. And here I thought you were just tryin to take advantage of me:hill: :beer:

Vitesse_6
02-08-2007, 11:01 PM
Ah ha!! So that's why you had me drink all that beer. Gave you empty beer botles. And here I thought you were just tryin to take advantage of me:hill: :beer:

I say run what brung ya!
I do the cheap "Mr.Beer" stuff, I dont have much time to do the good stuff.

But perhaps, I have no say, Im not in the club :blah:

MDH33
02-09-2007, 07:37 AM
Right on, I love that smell too. :)

I've been brewing since college (~10 yrs). Nothing too hardcore, usually a mix of malt extract and specialty grains. Haven't tried all-grain brewing yet. I have all the ingredients for a batch of Imperial Stout ready to go. My next investment is going to be a kegging system, washing and sterilizing bottles is the worst part of the whole process. I use growlers with reusable pressure caps for part of each batch, works good. Most worthwhile peice of equipement I've picked up is an immersion wort chiller. It will cool the wort from boiling down to 75 degrees in about 10 - 15 minutes. Here's a great website for supplies:

Northern Brewer (http://www.northernbrewer.com/)

:beer: :drink: :beer:

leiniesred
02-09-2007, 08:34 AM
I'm a beginning beer maker trying to fill a family hole in our home alcohol product line. My grandma makes about 20 gallons of wine/year and once in a while my grandpa will fire up his OEM Prohibition era still.

He is an active member of a Pheasant Club where they raise and release birds so people have something to shoot at like in the old days. I've seen the operation.
A row of incubators in a barn: eggs, eggs, chicks, tub of mash? eggs....He uses an incubator for a temperature controlled environment to work his mash.
He keeps his kit in straw filled wooden crates tucked away in a truck trailer out to the pole barn. When the time comes, he boils off his mash in the woods. "I switched to propane." oh yeah, why? "Less smoke." (The revenuers must still be out there after him.) The remains after boiling are fed to the pigs. The good stuff is stored in ball jars. I've shared some of his product with him. Sometimes, we cut it with scotch to "take the edge off." Wicked stuff.

nakman
02-09-2007, 08:39 AM
I've gone to one of those "U Brew It" places several times, they had one in Boulder in Table Mesa until about a year ago when he closed. It was exactly the amount of involvement I wanted to have with this hobby- you get 3-4 guys together, set the date then you all go in and brew a batch. They have evertything there, you just have to find & weigh out all the ingredients, grind up the grains, then do the cookin'. Drinking beer was encouraged while you did this.

The brewing process lasted about 2 hours, when you're done they drain it all into a big plastic carboy & add the yeast. You go back with your same group 2 weeks later and your beer is in kegs, then you work the bottles for about 2 hours, sampling everything in the process. Batches were usually $100-$150 each, we'd always just split the cost so everyone paid the same, then divide the beer up at the end, so you walked away with about 6 cases of bombers, 3-4 different flavors.

Maddmatt
02-09-2007, 09:28 AM
This thread is reminding me that I'm not drinking enough beer these days. Although this extended winter has made me rediscover stouts. I'll make sure I drink some this weekend to catch up.

Oh yeah, back on topic - I've always been interested in brewing but never actually done it, space, time and $ constraints have always scared me away, but I have read Michael Jackson's book several times, and several years ago I did force my way through a few cases of Grolsch to get the cool bottles in anticipation of brewing. Finally took 3 cases of those big bottles to recycling when we moved this last summer. :beer: :beer: :beer:

Turtle60
02-09-2007, 10:11 AM
A friend of mine has the Brew Hut (15108 E. Hampden Ave. Aurora, CO 80014). They sell all kinds of equipment and they brew lots of their own beer in the attached brewery (11 flavors on tap) and they give great advice. I'm far too lazy to brew my own, but they make some awesome beer. They won a gold medal at the 2006 World Beer Cup. I just buy the growlers.

IanB
02-09-2007, 11:25 AM
Just a check on who in the club is into making thier own barley pop?
My sweet wife and kids set me up for my birthday with a very deluxe setup. Tonight I just cooked up my first batch. I enjoyed the process very much! Gotta add the yeast when it cools another 10* and then the wait will be on! :thumb: PS....house smells great! ;)

I did years ago and loved it, but I don't have time now. I do have time to help you consume the results of your efforts though ;) :lmao: :bowdown: :beer: :hill: :cheers:

IanB
02-09-2007, 11:26 AM
This thread is reminding me that I'm not drinking enough beer these days.

I tell myself that every day... :D :bowdown: :beer: :boozer: :drink: :beer2:

Bobzooki
02-09-2007, 01:37 PM
I tried making beer once, and it turned out OK, but making wine is SO MUCH EASIER, that I stick with what I'm good at. Besides, now that I'm a Diabetic, beer is pretty much off the menu. Dry red wines won't spike my blood-sugar. I just had a batch of Merlot go crazy on me - I now have Sparkling Merlot. Totally unexpected. That stuff sat in the carboy for three months, without so much as a bubble - then after it was bottled, obviously, the yeast "woke up" and consumed the rest of the sugar. Very strange.

Uncle Ben
02-09-2007, 02:12 PM
For about 10 years I was a home brewer. I had a 5 gallon, all grain setup going. My brew kettle was a 7 gallon turkey fryer, which worked pretty good. But the novelty finally wore off a few years ago, really when we moved into the new house in '02. It wasn't convenient to do anymore. I didn't want to fire up a 100,000 BTU propane burner in the basement, so I used to work in the garage in the old house. It was attached and so I could work pretty easily between the kitchen, garage and finally into the basement. See I would steep the mash and lauter in the basement, take the wort up to the garage for the boil. I used a big coil of copper tubing to cool the wort and back down stairs to rack to the primary vessel (I used a big plastic tub for the primary ferment and carboys for the secondary). Well, at the new house the garage is detached, not to mention it's more snug in there than the old garage. So it got to be a PITA (particularly in the winter, best time to brew) and I just sort of stopped doing it. It's too bad this didn't come up earlier, I sold all that stuff about 6 months ago for like $200. I mean, it was a full end-to-end full grain system. The burner, a couple of brew kettles (the 7 gal big one and a 5 gallon stainless one that I fitted out for extract brewing), two 6 gallon glass carboys, a 7 gallon plastic fermenter, a false bottom mashtun with a cool sparging arm that rotated on the top, a heated sparge water tank (I stuck a water heater element into a bucket with a little Fujitsu temp controller), the wort chiller, bottle capper, a few bags of caps, a few cases of bottles. The whole shootin' match.

WOW! Nice setup! I have discovered I need a coil for chilling and I have also decided to do the multi tap Keg cooler because I can already tell that bottles are a PITA! I have the turkey fryer, 7 gal plastic fermenter and two carboys + all the brushes, funnels, hydrometer, thermometer, capping tool and misc. Just checked my Irish Red I made last night and it's flocking (pun intended) excellant, so far so good! I think this could be a fun side hobbie for a while. :drink: :thumb:

Uncle Ben
02-09-2007, 02:21 PM
I've gone to one of those "U Brew It" places several times, they had one in Boulder in Table Mesa until about a year ago when he closed. It was exactly the amount of involvement I wanted to have with this hobby- you get 3-4 guys together, set the date then you all go in and brew a batch. They have evertything there, you just have to find & weigh out all the ingredients, grind up the grains, then do the cookin'. Drinking beer was encouraged while you did this.

The brewing process lasted about 2 hours, when you're done they drain it all into a big plastic carboy & add the yeast. You go back with your same group 2 weeks later and your beer is in kegs, then you work the bottles for about 2 hours, sampling everything in the process. Batches were usually $100-$150 each, we'd always just split the cost so everyone paid the same, then divide the beer up at the end, so you walked away with about 6 cases of bombers, 3-4 different flavors.

Very cool! My first batch, excluding the hardware, cost $24 and some change. Next batch will be a tad cheaper as several items I bought with this batch will last for several batches. The hardest part is going to be the wait! I plan on making a second batch right after I transfer the first batch out of primary to secondary! I'm thinking an IPA will most likely be the next 5 gallons I make. :cool:

wesintl
02-09-2007, 05:09 PM
I used to hombrew alot in va because you couldn't get alot of good colorado or oreygun beers back east. Although just as I was leaving there have been some really good ones to say the least victory, dig fish head.

My best concauctions have been a true german wies beer and heavily dry hopped pales and IPA's

I need to get brewing again one of these days... My only tips are use wyeast or whitelabs... Yeast is everything in flavor.

Subscribe to BYO (http://byo.com/)

Uncle Ben
02-09-2007, 05:54 PM
I used to hombrew alot in va because you couldn't get alot of good colorado or oreygun beers back east. Although just as I was leaving there have been some really good ones to say the least victory, dig fish head.

My best concauctions have been a true german wies beer and heavily dry hopped pales and IPA's

I need to get brewing again one of these days... My only tips are use wyeast or whitelabs... Yeast is everything in flavor.

Subscribe to BYO (http://byo.com/)

I used Whitelabs. "What's Brewing" in Boulder is an excellant full service brewing store. Very helpful and huge selection of grains, malts and everything else. :drink:

MDH33
02-09-2007, 05:56 PM
Very cool! My first batch, excluding the hardware, cost $24 and some change. Next batch will be a tad cheaper as several items I bought with this batch will last for several batches. The hardest part is going to be the wait! I plan on making a second batch right after I transfer the first batch out of primary to secondary! I'm thinking an IPA will most likely be the next 5 gallons I make. :cool:

My recommendations:

Double the amount of malt in most recipes or add a pound or so of specialty grains and steep the water with them before the boil. It really adds body and gives the beer more substance. All of my latest recipes, like Pale ale, use at least 8 lbs of malt. The Wyeast smack packs Wes recommended work great.

Another trick is to always use whole hops, loose, in the boil. When you pour off the wort through a funnel with a screen, the hops act like a natural filter and help the final clarity of the beer. Plus, whole hops smell, taste, bitter, sooo much better than pellets.

I've also started double fermenting every batch. Meaning I let it ferment initially for about 10 days in a glass carboy with a blow off tube, then when it slows, I rack it off the sludge and into a second carboy with an airlock and let it ferment for as long as it needs depending on the type of beer. Extra malt will require some extra time, but it's worth the wait for the extra gravity. :thumb:

wesintl
02-10-2007, 09:48 AM
I can't wait to taste one :thumb:

What did you brew UB?

Uncle Ben
02-20-2007, 05:09 PM
Title says it all....gonna cook up a new batch tonight that should be done just in time for St. Patty's Day! This is fun! :thumb:

bh4rnnr
02-20-2007, 05:43 PM
Good to know your thinking of me:hill: :brick: :drink: :beer:

Uncle Ben
02-20-2007, 05:59 PM
Good to know your thinking of me:hill: :brick: :drink: :beer: Perry who? :confused: :hill: