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corsair23
04-12-2007, 01:26 PM
Discovered last night that the positive connector for my winch going to the battery is fubar. Connector looked weak and thin to begin with but with all of the pushing and prodding to route the cable to the battery the connector gave up the ghost.

So, now I guess I need to buy a new connector and a crimper, but as usual I know nothing about these. I've got your typical little electrical crimper deal for 14-20 ga wire but nothing big enough to do the 2 ga winch wire.

Is this what I need :eek:

http://www.mytoolstore.com/ideal/ide12-08.html

I read an old thread by Red Chili about relocating batteries to the rear on a 4Runner where he talked about getting a crimper that wasn't too expensive so I'm hoping that means I just don't know what I should be looking for.

TIA

wesintl
04-12-2007, 01:32 PM
Fill the lug with solder 1/-3/4 and insert cable end. Don't burn yourself. Then i put a shrink fit insulator on the end.

corsair23
04-12-2007, 01:40 PM
Hmmm...that holds ok? There won't be much (shouldn't be) stress on the cable but some of the ones for the winch look like the cable was fed in, crimped, and then a hole punched to make the "ring" or eye. I think my positive lead was a PO "redo" as the width of the metal on the ring isn't more than 1/8" wide, and now it is split/broken. HONEST. Tragic really as all the others are nice and thick.

Hants
04-12-2007, 01:57 PM
Here's a variety from DelCity:

http://www.delcity.net/delcity/servlet/catalog?parentid=229&page=1

The Die Cast Terminal Crimping Tool at about $150 (typical price) crimps all the way around and gives a (much) better mechanical connection than the $50 hammer/vice crimpers.

I've been eying it for my upcoming dual-battery/winch project. If you end up wanting to buy one, I'd consider splitting the cost with you :)

wesintl
04-12-2007, 01:58 PM
That's how I do mine.. I havent' had any issues. If your cable is short it might pull on it or if you use really stiff cable with less strands. Othewise that's how I did all my new cable connections for the new used winch and redoing my grounds on the rig.

nuclearlemon
04-12-2007, 03:02 PM
if you want to crimp it also, you can pound it in with a chisel, but the solder and heat shrink has worked for me for years.

trucruiser
04-12-2007, 04:05 PM
I have used the little crimper that they supply when you buy a custom set of ignition wires, tap with a hammer.
If you have never purchased a set of wires you have to crimp the ends on then you may not know what im talking about.

corsair23
04-12-2007, 04:14 PM
Alrighty...I'm going to try the solder/heat shrink trick first :)

I'm also going to run over to that JL Audio distributor just down the road from me as they have some really cool bling stuff that might work for a long term. I want to run the power for the winch, lights, and power center (secodary fuse block for CB, outlets, etc) off there and JL makes something that looks like it would make these connections real slick (see here (http://mobile.jlaudio.com/products_connections_detail.php?cat_id=10)). Of course no idea how much $$ that bling stuff cost :eek:


Hants, as for that crimping tool...That is tempting but I'm got to stay inexpensive for now as the mod fund has taken a serious hit lately :hill:

Hants
04-12-2007, 04:31 PM
... the mod fund has taken a serious hit lately :hill:


I suspect quite a few of us are in that boat right now :bawl:

Seldom Seen
04-12-2007, 05:23 PM
I've been working on mounting my winch in the 4Runner and I decided to mount the control box under the hood, so I'm going to need new cables.

Since the crimpers I had only go up to 6 ga, I figured I'd solder them as well. I did some searching on the marine sites for how-to's. I always defer to the boating crowd, for projects like this, 'cuz I can't think of a harsher environment for electrical connections.

This is what I found out: You must use tinned lugs and cable or be able to tin the lug and cable. Use non-acid flux and non-flux core solder that is formulated for electrical connections. The stuff you would use for soldering copper pipe won't work for making good connections.

All the articles I read DO NOT recommend soldering alone. Soldering, if done right, will make a good electrical connection but will not make a mechanical connection.

All of the how-to's I read highly recommend crimping 1st and then soldering!! Most of the articles stated that if crimping is done right, there is very little room for the solder to flow into anyway and there is little benefit to soldering other than increased water tightness. Dielectric grease and heat shrink will give equal weatherproofness.

Per Red Chili's recommendation I got me one of those hammer crimpers to finish the project and it works great. you are welcome to use it if you want.

I went over to Westmarine, on County Line, this week to pick up more cable and lugs and got to talking to one of the guys in there. Lo-and-behold they have an entire work bench set up for customers to use to make their own cables !!!!! Buy your stuff there and you are welcome to use it. Cutters, strippers and a bench mounted compound leverage crimper, every thing a gearhead would need to get-er-done right!!!!

RockRunner
04-12-2007, 05:23 PM
Take it to a stereo shop, they will do it ussually for free. I did that with my last truck, now I did buy a bunch of stuff from them in the past but I don't see them saying no.

RockRunner
04-12-2007, 05:25 PM
I suspect quite a few of us are in that boat right now :bawl:


I could not even buy my wife :Princess: a B-day present:o How do you think she took that :rant: Now I have to let her drive the 4Runner everyday for a month:( Plus I am still broke............

corsair23
04-12-2007, 05:49 PM
I went over to Westmarine, on County Line, this week to pick up more cable and lugs and got to talking to one of the guys in there. Lo-and-behold they have an entire work bench set up for customers to use to make their own cables !!!!! Buy your stuff there and you are welcome to use it. Cutters, strippers and a bench mounted compound leverage crimper, every thing a gearhead would need to get-er-done right!!!!

SWEET! That is super close to me. I'll have to swing by and check it out!

RockRunner
04-12-2007, 06:38 PM
SWEET! That is super close to me. I'll have to swing by and check it out!


Lookout for the price, I buy some of my boating items there but only when they are on sale.

corsair23
04-12-2007, 06:44 PM
Lookout for the price, I buy some of my boating items there but only when they are on sale.

Thanks for the heads up...Unfortunately they've got me while I'm in a hurry and can't spend too much time searching out the best price :hill:

Red_Chili
04-12-2007, 08:36 PM
Gee, I didn't even have to make a post!

+1 on Seldom Seen's advice BTW...

leiniesred
04-13-2007, 09:37 AM
Here is how I do it.
Use a propane torch to heat up the 2 gauge end you got at the car parts store. (hold it with pliers)
Tin the inside with solder.
Put heat shrink tubing on wire a couple of feet away from the end.
Stick cable in end.
Crimp by putting the end in the vice with the little craftsman screwdriver in the middle of the end so it smashes down the middle of the end to try to force the cable to seperate.
Test mechanical connection. Crimp a little more if it wiggles.
Heat up the crimped end and fill that sucker with solder. Go ahead an tin the outside if you want to. It seams to reduce corrosion.

Let cool. Then slip heat shrink tubing on. Use to torch one last time to do the heat shrink tubing.

Hants
04-13-2007, 10:52 AM
SWEET! That is super close to me. I'll have to swing by and check it out!


Post up your findings -- it sounds like it'd worth a trip up there (after all the components are acquired & mounted).

corsair23
04-13-2007, 12:21 PM
Post up your findings -- it sounds like it'd worth a trip up there (after all the components are acquired & mounted).

Will do Hants...I'll try to run by after work if they are still open today. If not it will be this weekend :thumb:

corsair23
04-15-2007, 11:42 PM
Post up your findings -- it sounds like it'd worth a trip up there (after all the components are acquired & mounted).

Ok...So I ventured to West Marine Friday evening. Nice guys in the store.

Impressions:

Selection: Pretty slim pickens. Not sure if they were just running low on some stuff or what but there wasn't much variety and they seemed to be out of a lot of items. I found what I need though so I was :D

Price: Tom mentioned in an earlier post that they are pricey. Not having priced out the stuff I needed I can't say for sure but I think I agree with Tom. Price for two 2ga battery terminal lugs/ring was around $8. Came in packages of 2. Crimper deal (actually a swagger?) was ~$25. I looked at price of 4ga cable and it was $5.50/foot but keep in mind this is a marine store so the cable is marine cable (so the guy said).

They do have the "work bench" where customers can put together their own cable (tough for me to do seeing that the cable was attached to the LX). Not much but looked decent enough to get the job done if you had all your cable measured out etc. I'm not sure if you could show up with your own stuff and use the bench.

I inquired about whether or not they offered clubs discounts. NOPE. I explained to the guy about the RS club and that it was through the forum that I heard about the store. It didn't seem to matter.

Anyway, if you are in a pinch and need some cable, lugs, etc. they have the items if you can't find the stuff elsewhere. This week I'm going to run into Quality Auto Sound on County Line just west of Quebec (SW corner next to Le Peep) to see what they have.

:cheers:

Rzeppa
04-16-2007, 08:15 PM
X3 on Wes' and Stephen's recommendations. Crimp connections are fine up to around a couple amps on a non-critical application. Having been in electronics design and manufacturing for over 25 years, including over 15 years of quality assurance, I would NEVER recommend a crimp connection for that application.

A proper soldered connection will be many times more reliable and many times more efficient (from I2 losses calculation and measurement) than a crimp connection. They do not use crimp connections in satellites and other flight-approved and space qualified connections, you shouldn't either!

As Stephen wrote, you must preheat the connector (after sliding the heat-shrink up onto the cable, well past the heated area of course!), then tin it and the cable strands generously with rosen core solder. I use a propane torch for sufficient heat for 2 AWG to 00 AWG thickness applications, a regular solder gun can't make enough heat. Apply the solder to the cable strands at the interface between the connector and the strands, feed it in until it's filled. Wait until it's cooled to the touch, then slide the heat shrink over the exposed joint, heat and shrink. Voila! A mechanically and electrically sound joint that will last as long as your Toyota!

PS, while waiting for the molten solder to solidify, do not allow the joint to move even the slightest, or else you end up with a "cold" solder joint, negating the reliability advantages of a soldered joint over a crimped one.

Seldom Seen
04-17-2007, 02:04 AM
They do not use crimp connections in satellites and other flight-approved and space qualified connections, you shouldn't either!

Humm....:confused:

SkyLab
Space Shuttle x2
Hubble
Rocket scientists who don't know the difference between feet and meters.
Last and by no means least, it was the electrical connections that caused the cryO-tanks to explode on Apallo 13

Yea that really inspires confidence :rolleyes:

Crimping is good enough for Mr. Toyoda it's good enough for me.

Red_Chili
04-17-2007, 07:44 AM
Ya, actually, I used to inspect crimp connectors on flight avionics for Peacekeeper and Titan missiles/launch vehicles.
Mind you, there were exceptionally well crimped, and I looked at them at 30X. But they were crimped.

RockRunner
04-17-2007, 08:52 AM
Ya, actually, I used to inspect crimp connectors on flight avionics for Peacekeeper and Titan missiles/launch vehicles.
Mind you, there were exceptionally well crimped, and I looked at them at 30X. But they were crimped.

Bill, if you want I can find some of your old tested items laying around here :D They have so much crap in storage it is amazing.

Red_Chili
04-17-2007, 09:51 AM
Naw, I saw all I needed to!!!
The funny part was, when LM (then, MM) contracted with Motorola to set up a line to produce transistors to 1960s standards - cuz that's what was qual tested! 5lb. 'NOT' gates, welded ribbon assemblies... antique row!

Rzeppa
04-17-2007, 07:15 PM
I stand by my assertion that in this particular application, a properly soldered large gauge wire will be more reliable and have smaller I2R losses than a crimped one - mind you I am a big fan of crimped connections for certain applications, this just isn't one where crimped is better!

Several decades of failure analysis under my belt on this :-)

Uncle Ben
04-18-2007, 12:31 AM
I stand by my assertion that in this particular application, a properly soldered large gauge wire will be more reliable and have smaller I2R losses than a crimped one - mind you I am a big fan of crimped connections for certain applications, this just isn't one where crimped is better!

Several decades of failure analysis under my belt on this :-)


For winching, starting and other high load applications crimp(swagged) is better! Solder will melt right out unless your using silver! With standard lead you will create a fusible link.

Hants
04-18-2007, 08:57 AM
I don't hear any wizened recommendations for solder & crimping???

For winch & other high-amperage, heavy gauge situations, would solder (silver?) and crimping be recommended? I'm thinking get it hot, solder it up, crimp it while its still HOT.

In the marine world, they swear by crimping and using high-quality, sealing, heat-shrink. Would this be because it is more difficult to get a good solder joint? I've heard that mechanical/vibration failure is the big concern with solder-only joints.

Keep in mind that I have NO real-world experience with this, just a bunch of web & book lern'n.

Uncle Ben
04-18-2007, 09:57 AM
I don't hear any wizened recommendations for solder & crimping???

For winch & other high-amperage, heavy gauge situations, would solder (silver?) and crimping be recommended? I'm thinking get it hot, solder it up, crimp it while its still HOT.

In the marine world, they swear by crimping and using high-quality, sealing, heat-shrink. Would this be because it is more difficult to get a good solder joint? I've heard that mechanical/vibration failure is the big concern with solder-only joints.

Keep in mind that I have NO real-world experience with this, just a bunch of web & book lern'n.

Crimp and solder would be fine. The key to any long lasting wire termination is heat shrinking! Solder (especially standard soft lead) will corrode in a moisture environment if it is not sealed. If you look at factory heavy gauge wire ends they are either swagged or molded but not soldered. When doing small gauge wiring connections the best (permanent) way is soldering and heat shrink sealing. The worse kind of connection is aluminum crimp connectors. The cheap aluminum used has very little memory and of course you are using aluminum on copper which is a catalyst for dissimilar metal corrosion. These standard type of crimp connectors are considered temporary or only intended for non critical connections.

Rzeppa
04-18-2007, 08:06 PM
For winching, starting and other high load applications crimp(swagged) is better! Solder will melt right out unless your using silver! With standard lead you will create a fusible link.For winching, starting and other high load applications SOLDERING is better. Solder will not melt unless it is subject to the heat caused by I2R losses from an improper connection.

A PROPER solder joint will ALWAYS have lower resistance (that's the "R" in I2R, it doesn't appear that the forum text editor will allow the superscript for the square sign) losses, resulting in less heat than ANYWHERE else in the circuit, including the wire itself.

When designing and building 50,000 watt laser power supplies, we were taught to always solder the 00 AWG, but a few engineers thought that crimping might save a few bucks when manufacturing thousands of units. After a few mishaps in the lab, it was empirically evident that the soldered terminal made virtually no heat, while the crimped ones melted and burned up.

Crimping is fine for certain types of low amperage applications, but for high amperage applications a PROPER solder joint is ALWAYS better.

Seldom Seen
04-18-2007, 08:12 PM
that's the "R" in I2R, it doesn't appear that the forum text editor will allow the superscript for the square sign

IČR ?

Uncle Ben
04-18-2007, 08:41 PM
After searching the web I will concede as all engineering experts seem to agree with what you say. I was always taught high amperage and soft solder were a no no. This is definitely your field of expertise so I will read and learn! In the early days we fixed alternators and starters in shop and we had to use high temp silver solder as a loaded alternator will "throw" soft solder in a heartbeat.

:thumb: :)
For winching, starting and other high load applications SOLDERING is better. Solder will not melt unless it is subject to the heat caused by I2R losses from an improper connection.

A PROPER solder joint will ALWAYS have lower resistance (that's the "R" in I2R, it doesn't appear that the forum text editor will allow the superscript for the square sign) losses, resulting in less heat than ANYWHERE else in the circuit, including the wire itself.

When designing and building 50,000 watt laser power supplies, we were taught to always solder the 00 AWG, but a few engineers thought that crimping might save a few bucks when manufacturing thousands of units. After a few mishaps in the lab, it was empirically evident that the soldered terminal made virtually no heat, while the crimped ones melted and burned up.

Crimping is fine for certain types of low amperage applications, but for high amperage applications a PROPER solder joint is ALWAYS better.

Rzeppa
04-18-2007, 08:48 PM
Yeah, that's the one:

I*I*R=P=heat

Less R=less heat :-)

In all due respect, it is not easy to get a PROPER solder joint on something like large diameter wire and a huge copper terminal without a fair amount of practice and experience. The result for someone who doesn't have a lot of experience in soldering may well be a connection worse than a crimp, which normally doesn't require as much expertise, resulting in larger R :-)

WARNING! Proper application of heat shrink can also require some experience, and improper installation can actually make corrosion worse from gaps allowing moisture intrusion!

To whoever posted the question about crimping plus soldering: Storage Tech tried this during the 80s on their minicomputer power supplies that we used to build and saw zero improvement in reliability over crimped-only connections. These were applications that saw no adverse environmental conditions such as in automotive or other transportation related applications. They were also only in the 2-20 amp range so losses weren't as important as reliability.

To whoever posted about space-qualified reliability: No spacecraft with soldered connections have been lost due to failure of a soldered electrical connection. All of the examples listed were due to other causes.

There are many other engineering concerns in electrical systems besides whether a connection is crimped or soldered. Kevin's warning about aluminum is an example, but insulation material and thickness, wire routing, cable stranding, strain relief and many others must be considered in overall system design.

Rzeppa
04-18-2007, 08:52 PM
After searching the web I will concede as all engineering experts seem to agree with what you say. I was always taught high amperage and soft solder were a no no. This is definitely your field of expertise so I will read and learn! In the early days we fixed alternators and starters in shop and we had to use high temp silver solder as a loaded alternator will "throw" soft solder in a heartbeat.

:thumb: :)No doubt, that's a totally different application! A loaded alternator will generate tons of heat on it's own due to producing power and it's inefficiencies producing heat, just as any engine produces heat as an inefficiency from converting power. The heat is conducted to everything, including the connections inside the alternator or starter. It isn't the solder joint which is making the heat, but it is subjected to heat nonetheless and must withstand it, hence the silver solder, which has a higher melting point than convention alloys of tin/lead.

Uncle Ben
04-18-2007, 09:32 PM
No doubt, that's a totally different application! A loaded alternator will generate tons of heat on it's own due to producing power and it's inefficiencies producing heat, just as any engine produces heat as an inefficiency from converting power. The heat is conducted to everything, including the connections inside the alternator or starter. It isn't the solder joint which is making the heat, but it is subjected to heat nonetheless and must withstand it, hence the silver solder, which has a higher melting point than convention alloys of tin/lead.

Sooooo....wouldn't the battery terminals under that same hood be subjected to that same heat? They would be very close to the 220 degree radiator, and the starter leads are most likely in close proximity to 500 degree exhaust headers. I've seen winch cable with melted insulation when the operator didn't know what they were doing and continued winching despite the smoke. :confused:

Hants
04-18-2007, 09:43 PM
I think part of the concern with solder-only joints in automotive/marine environments is vibration & mechanical stress.

But, then again, I don't build military lasers or space gear... maybe they have the same issues?

Seldom Seen
04-19-2007, 12:17 AM
No spacecraft with soldered connections have been lost due to failure of a soldered electrical connection. All of the examples listed were due to other causes.

Not yet anyway, given their track record, and the commonality of the thought process amongst every flavor of rocket scientist, it's only a matter of time.

I think it was the dOOd in Apollo 13 that said it best, "We are going to the moon sitting on top of a pile of parts sold to the government by the lowest bidder"

Anyway adding IČR instead of I2R to my searches yielded far more relevant hits. I have yet to find any source that backs Jeff's claim. Seems the debate as to whether a soldered connection has less resistance than a swedged electrical connection is akin to the debate between Gulliver's Lilliputians and Blefuscuans over whether to open an egg at the big end or at the little end. The argument may never be settled. The only thing that can be agreed on is the only sure way to decrease R is to increase the cross sectional area of the conductor and terminal.

I did find several sources that state soldering does NOT make an adequate mechanical connection in automotive apps. Soldering will not withstand vibration the way crimped connections will. As far as the heat situation w/ solder that UB pointed out "...for temperature cycling.. anything where there's a coefficient of expansion mismatch you can get little stress cracks leading to increased thermal and electrical resistance". When a lug is crimped on the process cold works the copper so the lug is actually welded to the wire making an incredibly strong connection. Think about how a hook is connected to a winch cable. I don't think any one would solder a winch cable.

Hants, I found one source the stated that adding solder to a crimped connection can actually weaken it. Solder can interfere with the copper bonds created during swedging. If the joint is tight very little solder will flow into the lug but it will be wicked up the cable, away from the lug, making the cable stiff and the joint less resistant to vibration.

Red_Chili
04-19-2007, 08:06 AM
In the marine world, they swear by crimping and using high-quality, sealing, heat-shrink. Would this be because it is more difficult to get a good solder joint? I've heard that mechanical/vibration failure is the big concern with solder-only joints.

This is the method I used. Solid crimp on welding cable (not just 1/0), finer strands. Then meltable heat shrink. Then polyolefin heat shrink. Thoroughly sealed.

I'm thinking get it hot, solder it up, crimp it while its still HOT.
Not good. In MM solder school (based on NASA training) I learned just what such a joint looks like under 30X! If you are going to solder it, tin it, then crimp it, then flux it (with electronic flux, not acid flux used in plumbing :eek:), then flow solder into the joint.

Solder will melt under very high current applications but only if the joint is ohmic (resistance due to corrosion or other causes).

Red_Chili
04-19-2007, 08:12 AM
I think part of the concern with solder-only joints in automotive/marine environments is vibration & mechanical stress.

But, then again, I don't build military lasers or space gear... maybe they have the same issues?
Like none other.
Lots of crimped connections were used in flight electronics on the launch vehicles I inspected. Lots of soldered connections. But then they were potted. Everything was sealed, and everything was completely immobilized one way or the other.
I am satisfied with a solidly swaged, completely sealed connection. YMMV.

Hants
04-19-2007, 09:56 AM
I'm back to where I started, then: welding/marine cable with swaged connectors and triple-seal heat shrink.

Now, where does one find a high quality mechanical-advantage (or hydraulic) swager for less than an arm and a leg? I'm talking the ones that are 2 feet long, not the hammer/vice/cold-chisel method.

Earlier in this thread, it was mentioned that West Marine has a work bench with a good swager... but the component supply appears sketchy.

I can justify in my mind affording the connectors & cables from West Marine if it saves spending $150+ on a swager that I'll likely only use once or twice in my lifetime. But going up there to find that they're out of supplies would be a big waste of time...

Red_Chili
04-19-2007, 10:54 AM
Letcher finners do da walkin'...

corsair23
04-19-2007, 12:59 PM
Now, where does one find a high quality mechanical-advantage (or hydraulic) swager for less than an arm and a leg? I'm talking the ones that are 2 feet long, not the hammer/vice/cold-chisel method....

Hants, I didn't pay a lot of attention to the crimper that West Marine had attached to the work bench (on account that I couldn't use it for my application) but it looked pretty heavy duty...Big red sucker with probably a 2' handle so I imagine it would put a pretty good crimp on the cable.

I went ahead and purchased the swaging tool (looks exactly like this - nicopress swaging tool (http://www.aircraftspruce.com/catalog/topages/swagingtool.php)) 'cuz I was running out of options. It seemed to put a serious crimp (swag ?) on the terminal/cable. Then ('cuz I was thinking this was a temp deal) I quadruple coated the ends with some liquid black tape stuff I had (you can see it here - pic #4 (http://www.risingsun4x4club.org/forum2/showpost.php?p=32404&postcount=2)). If I leave it this way then I'll go ahead and put some heat shrink tube on there as well.

Earlier in this thread, it was mentioned that West Marine has a work bench with a good swager... but the component supply appears sketchy.

I can justify in my mind affording the connectors & cables from West Marine if it saves spending $150+ on a swager that I'll likely only use once or twice in my lifetime. But going up there to find that they're out of supplies would be a big waste of time...

If you need me to, I can run by there for you to see if they have what you need before you make the trip up. I would just need a list/description and a few days notice. And, you're more than welcome to try the swaging tool I bought to see how it would work for you. I'm not sure if it will do 1/0 ga cable but it handled the 2ga winch cable reasonably well. Just let me know how I can help :)

Hants
04-19-2007, 02:47 PM
Hants, I didn't pay a lot of attention to the crimper that West Marine had attached to the work bench (on account that I couldn't use it for my application) but it looked pretty heavy duty...Big red sucker with probably a 2' handle so I imagine it would put a pretty good crimp on the cable.

I went ahead and purchased the swaging tool (looks exactly like this - nicopress swaging tool (http://www.aircraftspruce.com/catalog/topages/swagingtool.php)) 'cuz I was running out of options. It seemed to put a serious crimp (swag ?) on the terminal/cable. Then ('cuz I was thinking this was a temp deal) I quadruple coated the ends with some liquid black tape stuff I had (you can see it here - pic #4 (http://www.risingsun4x4club.org/forum2/showpost.php?p=32404&postcount=2)). If I leave it this way then I'll go ahead and put some heat shrink tube on there as well.

If you need me to, I can run by there for you to see if they have what you need before you make the trip up. I would just need a list/description and a few days notice. And, you're more than welcome to try the swaging tool I bought to see how it would work for you. I'm not sure if it will do 1/0 ga cable but it handled the 2ga winch cable reasonably well. Just let me know how I can help :)
Thanks, Jeff, for the additional info and the generous offers. :thumb::beer:

The crimper you describe at WM sounds like what I need. As I get closer to needing it, I'll touch bases with you. :)

I'm working on 4 projects concurrently -- ain't I clever! :hill:

1. OBA
2. Dual batteries with auto-paralleling
3. Auxiliary power distribution with ability to add/consolidate accessory relays
4. Winch

They're somewhat interrelated (at least the way I'm trying to do them), and I really hate doing something, then un/re-doing later.

Right now, its *possible* that I'll have OBA operational by CM. I doubt I'll get the dual batteries installed by then. The power distribution & winch projects will definitely be after CM.

:cheers:

Uncle Ben
04-19-2007, 04:24 PM
My cable swagger looks like a bolt cutter except the jaws have differant crimp molds. It puts an incredible swag on things! On my synthetic winch rope I pulled the original drum anchor off the first time I tried to wind it tight. I used my crimper an the old end that I reopened and it held the next time I wound it tight...no problem! When I do a winch cable or batt cable I slip on the appropriate color of heat shrink, crimp on the terminal, coat it with liquid tape then contract the heatshink. I have never had a terminal fail yet and I have been doing it that way for about 20 years!



I went ahead and purchased the swaging tool (looks exactly like this - nicopress swaging tool (http://www.aircraftspruce.com/catalog/topages/swagingtool.php)) 'cuz I was running out of options.



If you need me to, I can run by there for you to see if they have what you need before you make the trip up. I would just need a list/description and a few days notice. And, you're more than welcome to try the swaging tool I bought to see how it would work for you. I'm not sure if it will do 1/0 ga cable but it handled the 2ga winch cable reasonably well. Just let me know how I can help :)

Seldom Seen
04-19-2007, 04:45 PM
Figured repeated blows with a hammer might do more harm than good

Necessity being the mother..................

Uncle Ben
04-19-2007, 05:12 PM
Figured repeated blows with a hammer might do more harm than good

Necessity being the mother..................


Now thats REALLY COOL! Any book techs out there wanna figure the pounds per square inch of force involved? That's bad arse! Guess now I'll have to get one of those style crimpers and put it in the 50 ton vice and so on.....and so on....and..... ;) :lmao: :thumb: