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View Full Version : To ham or not to ham, that is the question....


Uncle Ben
12-20-2007, 08:50 AM
This is a private poll so folks can vote freely and honestly and only the vote will show. :thumb:

Shark Bait
12-20-2007, 09:03 AM
Really private, I guess. :thumb:

I Ham, and I think you should if you can. I'm not enough of a Ham bigot, yet, to say "Dump the CB". I will probably run both in my 40 just so I can talk to the CBer's as well as Hams when on runs.

Is Ham better? The short answer is yes. With essentially similar components you have much longer range with 2m than CB. And the Ham repeater system adds a whole dimension not available with CB. It's a lot harder to sit in my garage and talk to, say Farnham, in Vail over a CB than it is a 2m Ham radio. And if you decide to build on the Ham hobby you can literally talk around the world from your back yard. Again, a lot harder if not impossible with CB.

Romer
12-20-2007, 09:15 AM
I have both and will keep both. What is it Cheesman says? he doesn't need a winch because someone he wheels with always does.

Lots of folks will keep running CBs and as trail leaders in Moab we need to keep the CBs as most folks there have one. The HAM comes in useful to talk to base or other members on other trails. Or you can have a conversation with someone without talking to the entire group on the trail.

DaveInDenver
12-20-2007, 09:34 AM
The poll has a bit of a hole. There's no option for keeping the CB only because of the dinosaurs. ;-) I don't plan to rip it out, but it pretty much only gets used on club runs. Most of the non-4WD people I hang out with use ham or at least FRS. But in fairness we're talking about cyclists, skiers, hikers, etc. So a CB is just impractical to keep in a backpack. Not impossible, just less good.

Jacket
12-20-2007, 09:47 AM
The added range and benefit of Ham is indisputable, but CB is still the LCD on the trails. Having both makes the most sense, but for someone who can't even figure out where to put on radio in his truck, installing two becomes a real challenge.

And it sucks to be the only guy out on the trail with a Ham if everyone else is talking on CB.

Uncle Ben
12-20-2007, 10:03 AM
I'm really enjoying these debates on radios! I think it is an important subject for the club to think about. We have other bogus debates like my truck is better because.... but this is a real topic that will come up a lot in the future. If you look at other club forums this issue is obviously wide spread. There is at least one club in TLCA that this subject has got way out of hand and folks are taking hard sides. The more we communicate these real issues the better and stronger our club will be from it as we know and respect each others feelings! Keep it going and please be honest about how you feel! :thumb: :risingsun

treerootCO
12-20-2007, 10:18 AM
Trichinosis is no longer a threat from American ham and pork :lmao:

wait....what were you talking about? :p:

leiniesred
12-20-2007, 10:25 AM
My CB is also a compass, and weather radio.

Is there a cheap ham/CB radio/compass/weather radio? What's the difference in hardware between a HAM radio and a CB radio?

Should I hold out a little longer with just a CB until we are all talking via bluetooth headsets linked to a satelite based VOIP system?
Isn't the internet based on packet radio technology anyway?

Red_Chili
12-20-2007, 10:34 AM
No one I wheel with outside Rising Sun has ham. Trichinosis or not. It's usefulness is beyond dispute particularly in an emergency. But as stated, CB is still the LCD, and useful for highway trips for road info.

A radio may be technically superior but it has to reach a critical mass of users and ease of casual operation to be useful for chit-chat, spotting instructions, etc. One of ham's limitations seems to me to be one of its strengths: the signal travels a LONG way. A CB signal stays pretty much within the group. Unless I am missing something, which seems likely since I know nothing about ham really.

DaveInDenver
12-20-2007, 10:35 AM
My CB is also a compass, and weather radio.

Is there be a cheap ham/CB radio/compass/weather radio? What's the difference in hardware between a HAM radio and a CB radio?

Should I hold out a little longer with just a CB until we are all talking via bluetooth headsets linked to a satelite based VOIP system?
Dunno about a compass, I just carry one of those. But just about every single 2 meter ham radio can receive the weather bands. There's only 9 frequencies and the one in Denver is 162.550 MHz. Beyond, most radios made in the last decade or so will do what's call wide band receive, which means they can pick up frequencies way beyond where they can transmit. The radio I have is sort of lower middle quality and can receive aircraft bands, weather, commercial, public safety (even hear the National Park Service, BLM and USFS radios), FRS, GMRS. I can only transmit on the ham bands, but I can listen to just about every radio that transmits from 108MHz to 999MHz (with a handful of off limit bands, like cell phones).

Ask the people down in New Orleans how counting on stuff like VoIP and cell phones worked out. Only the ham guys were getting messages in and out...

Uncle Ben
12-20-2007, 10:59 AM
Dunno about a compass, I just carry one of those. But just about every single 2 meter ham radio can receive the weather bands. There's only 9 frequencies and the one in Denver is 162.550 MHz. Beyond, most radios made in the last decade or so will do what's call wide band receive, which means they can pick up frequencies way beyond where they can transmit. The radio I have is sort of lower middle quality and can receive aircraft bands, weather, commercial, public safety (even hear the National Park Service, BLM and USFS radios), FRS, GMRS. I can only transmit on the ham bands, but I can listen to just about every radio that transmits from 108MHz to 999MHz (with a handful of off limit bands, like cell phones).

Ask the people down in New Orleans how counting on stuff like VoIP and cell phones worked out. Only the ham guys were getting messages in and out...

Dave,
I don't think other than by friendly taunting anyone disputes the utility of ham radio. They play an important role in worldwide communication on both surface and air. The debate for us as "responsible off-highway enthusiasts" is whether every rig out there needs to have 2 meter communication in addition to OR instead of Citizen band radios. I think it is a no-brainer that most all agree that EVERY rig needs some type of communication!

DaveInDenver
12-20-2007, 11:00 AM
No one I wheel with outside Rising Sun has ham. Trichinosis or not. It's usefulness is beyond dispute particularly in an emergency. But as stated, CB is still the LCD, and useful for highway trips for road info.

A radio may be technically superior but it has to reach a critical mass of users and ease of casual operation to be useful for chit-chat, spotting instructions, etc. One of ham's limitations seems to me to be one of its strengths: the signal travels a LONG way. A CB signal stays pretty much within the group. Unless I am missing something, which seems likely since I know nothing about ham really.
No argument, CB isn't at a point where we can just throw it out. It's too prevalent in the 4WD community to consider it. But it's usefulness overall is pretty limited to us and OTR trucks. I think when the FCC dropped the Morse requirement for ham, it became much more attractive to casual users. I'm not a big time ham hobbyist like a few of the guys, I just use it as a tool since we travel alone a lot and CB is all but useless since no one with authority monitors it. At least with ham you have the option of an autopatch or getting another ham with a phone. But that's really the key, ham can scale from just a glorified CB to the most complex installation you want. Really, in its most basic form, a 2m single band radio, the only difference on the trail will be that you technically need to say your call sign every 10 minutes and your radio requires a bit of programming. It's seriously no tougher than programming a phone or something.

Dave,
I don't think other than by friendly taunting anyone disputes the utility of ham radio. They play an important role in worldwide communication on both surface and air. The debate for us as "responsible off-highway enthusiasts" is whether every rig out there needs to have 2 meter communication in addition to OR instead of Citizen band radios. I think it is a no-brainer that most all agree that EVERY rig needs some type of communication!
I know, just saying that maybe it's time that we stop telling new guys to install a CB. If there's a better option, you gotta make a break from the old ways at some point and so if we get a few more guys off the dime maybe we won't need to have newbies even bother with a CB.

Just thinking about 2009 when the old way of TV will stop working. I dunno, it's possible I'm the only goofball still using rabbit ears, but I won't have a choice when the old FM transmitters are turned off and digital TV is the only option. I figure it's like that with hams in 4WD trucks. Personally I think GMRS makes the most sense, but it seems ham has sort of become the next thing, which is fine.

Uncle Ben
12-20-2007, 11:19 AM
I can't edit the post questions but the 4th one should read "Someday I might go ham but I will still keep my cb."

I tried to cover all true bases but I screwed up that verbiage.

Corbet
12-20-2007, 11:56 AM
I will install a HAM as soon as I remove the 80 from company service. Until then I'll have to live with my handheld CB. But in the end the CB will always still be in the truck too.

Groucho
12-20-2007, 02:40 PM
My CB is also a compass, and weather radio.

Is there a cheap ham/CB radio/compass/weather radio? What's the difference in hardware between a HAM radio and a CB radio? CB radio is rigidly regulated by the FCC in what can be part of a CB transciever. They have a limit of 5 watts. They can utilize primarily the following modes:AM, USB or LSB. HAM will be superior technology and all modes avaialble.

Amateur Radio Service is more centered around the tinkering and experimental, so less regulation on equipment is present. Power is limited to 1500 watts, and RF exposure levels can be things of debate as well as show stoppers. Those are primarily for safety.

Should I hold out a little longer with just a CB until we are all talking via bluetooth headsets linked to a satelite based VOIP system? Yaesu makes a dual bander that is bluetooth compatible. Many repeaters today use VOIP in the form of either Echolink or IRLP(Internet Radio Linking Project). That means that anyone who can befirend a member of a VOIP node can talk to austrailia if they want to, with the same radio as we're talking about putting in the trucks.

Isn't the internet based on packet radio technology anyway?Yes. Email primarily. Cell Phone technology can be traced back to Amateur tinkering as well.


One of ham's limitations seems to me to be one of its strengths: the signal travels a LONG way. A CB signal stays pretty much within the group. Unless I am missing something, which seems likely since I know nothing about ham really.Both are exactly the same in how they work. CB is limited due to its frequency in relation to the size of antennas commonly used. For a more efficient setup, the antenna should be upwards of 120" for a vertical(whip). That is primarily why CB is limited in its distance. VHF(2M) Ranges from 30 to 100 miles depending on terrain and atmospherical conditions. Both CB and HAM distances are directly related between wavelength and frequency. This relation, mixed with the antenna setup is what gives each their limitations in terms of distance between stations.


Just thinking about 2009 when the old way of TV will stop working. I dunno, it's possible I'm the only goofball still using rabbit ears, but I won't have a choice when the old FM transmitters are turned off and digital TV is the only option. I figure it's like that with hams in 4WD trucks. Personally I think GMRS makes the most sense, but it seems ham has sort of become the next thing, which is fine.

I just got done installing an Air antenna in the attic. Not rabbit ears, but it shows you where you stand when everybody is talking about their MTV Road Rules Survivor Challenge. I did hear that those of us who have non-HD reciever ready TVs will get coupons toward buying a converter box in 2009 to offset the expense. This is so that the Gubment can justify taking away a technology and replacing it with another.

Red_Chili
12-20-2007, 02:46 PM
Yabut, don't things get cluttered with a bunch of 4x4 groups doing their inane chatting on the trail and somebody across town trying to use the same frequency gets irritated? CBs fall off pretty quickly, keeping things more private and less intrusive in such a situation, no?

nakman
12-20-2007, 03:31 PM
Yabut, don't things get cluttered with a bunch of 4x4 groups doing their inane chatting on the trail and somebody across town trying to use the same frequency gets irritated? CBs fall off pretty quickly, keeping things more private and less intrusive in such a situation, no?

That's why you have so many channels, and also why you limit your transmit power to the lowest necessary to still communicate. There's a National calling frequency for simplex (146.520) that is similar to CB's channel 19... there are the repeaters around town that are more popular and allow you to talk across town & beyond, and there are the repeaters that are tied into the Colorado network that allow you to talk across the state, especially on the I-70 corridor.

When on the trail, we wouldn't use any of these. The "official" Rising Sun simplex frequency is 146.460, which we borrowed from the Norcal80's guys. But if that channel was busy for some reason, no reason for the group to not pop up to 146.475, or 146.490, or whatever until we didn't run into anyone. It's going to be fun at the Rubithon this summer on 2m, since Norcal will no doubt be on 146.460, RS will be on another frequency, another group on another, etc. We'll be talking back & forth among groups all day, even when miles apart.

Hulk
12-20-2007, 05:55 PM
I can't edit the post questions but the 4th one should read "Someday I might go ham but I will still keep my cb."

I tried to cover all true bases but I screwed up that verbiage.

Fixed it for you in the poll.

Uncle Ben
12-20-2007, 06:00 PM
Fixed it for you in the poll.

Thank you!

ginericLC
12-21-2007, 08:07 AM
I can tell you that the HAM is very useful when you get out and about and away from the rest of the world and need some help.

Expense is no longer an excuse. $14 license, $120 Yaesu 2M, $35 mag mount antenna, and you have a basic set up. That is less than the cost of 3 tanks of gas.

No more crackling garbage messages, no more half of the radios not working, no more having to worry about the local trucks interrupting your transmissions.

And best of all, unlike most of the CBs out there, you can buy radios that are not made in China :)

DaveInDenver
12-21-2007, 08:20 AM
And best of all, unlike most of the CBs out there, you can buy radios that are not made in China :)
That is an interesting point, both of my Yaesu units were made in Japan.

Seldom Seen
12-21-2007, 08:38 AM
Yabut, don't things get cluttered with a bunch of 4x4 groups doing their inane chatting on the trail and somebody across town trying to use the same frequency gets irritated? CBs fall off pretty quickly, keeping things more private and less intrusive in such a situation, no?

1)go QRP, decrease your power to the min required to keep contact. When Groucho and I went to Mt. Bross we were talking between trucks with as little as 1 watt and still had better performance than CB but weren't bothering any one else on freq (at least until we got above tree line)

2)Attenuate incoming signals, tighten up your RF gain. Essentially you are DECREASING your radio's receiving distance. Some radios have this option some don't.

3)CTSS, Continuous Tone Squelching System. Basically a sub-audible tone that is sent with YOUR signal. I set MY radio to only accept transmissions that contain the tone (and visa-versa)

Groucho
12-21-2007, 09:59 AM
3)CTSS, Continuous Tone Squelching System. Basically a sub-audible tone that is sent with YOUR signal. I set MY radio to only accept transmissions that contain the tone (and visa-versa)

I totally spaced that one! What that means is that in a way, the transmission is basically encripted with a sub-audible tone. When you transmit, that tone says to other radios "If you aren't set up to hear me(the tone) then you won't get the rest of the transmission". That way, only others in the group with the tone will hear you. And it is not hard to figure out the tone if you know the freq and don't hear anyone. Most radios have a tone search to figure it out.

Nice call, Brian!:thumb:

Red_Chili
12-21-2007, 10:08 AM
Brian, right after you teach me to field strip my AR-15, you gonna hafta skool me in da ham arts.

Groucho
12-21-2007, 11:12 AM
Brian, right after you teach me to field strip my AR-15, you gonna hafta skool me in da ham arts.

Are you saying you don't know how to field strip your AR-15? Is it just that the hand guards are difficult to get off, is the bolt hard to put back together or is the trigger where you just can't figure it all out?:hill:

Red_Chili
12-21-2007, 11:56 AM
I ain't done it since new. I wanted to sit at the feet of an ex-Army guy and learn the dark arts. It's just that... that... he is so SeldomSeen.

Groucho
12-21-2007, 12:22 PM
I qualify. Don't tell the neighbors. Had Top Secret clearance while on active duty due to my responsibilities in ordering, issuing, transporting and handling ammunitions. Nuthin special, just had enough different kinds of ammo right be hind me most of the time to make a crater out of Berthoud.
Was an armorers asst for 3 mos. HATED the handguards. But I got to carry a 9MM instead of an M-16A2, so I felt like dirty harry instead of GI Joe.
I don't think I remember the difference between th AR-15 and the M-16A2 trigger mechanism to enable me to adapt the AR-15 to semi-auto or even full-auto(M-16A1 style:D).

Red_Chili
12-21-2007, 12:51 PM
Mine is semi auto out of the box. Oly. Full auto, though fun and expensive, would net me a permanent retirement plan I'd bet.
Gee, another one stop shop. Field stripping and hamming it up mentoring. You're on.

Seldom Seen
12-21-2007, 01:32 PM
Groucho, do you remember, "Shoot, Communicate, Move"? I think we got'er covered X3 !

Groucho
12-21-2007, 02:25 PM
No, I remember:
"Is there anyone downrange? Is there anyone downrange? Range 216 is about to conduct a live-fire exercise. If there is anyone downrange please indicate to the tower by sight sound or signal." (PAUSE)
"Ready on the left?"
"Ready on the right?"
"Firers rotate your selector switch from safe to semi."
"and firers, watch your lanes!"

Seldom Seen
12-21-2007, 04:10 PM
But just about every single 2 meter ham radio can receive the weather bands. There's only 9 frequencies and the one in Denver is 162.550 MHz.

I've noticed that my 2mtr works better receiving NWS broadcast than my CB. NWS transmits on VHF and 2mtr is VHF so the antenna and radio are optimized for receive in this band. CB's are HF with the VHF receiver thrown as a marketing gimmick.

My mobile does not have an alert but I do have it set up for 1 touch access.

During last years blizzard I volunteered to bring people into work. in a 12 hour period I made 17 trips between Swedish, Porter, Skyridge and Littleton along with picking people up at their homes. While I was on the road I monitored one of the Skywarn nets. Skywarn is a group of trained volunteer on the ground weather observers. Skywarn feeds information directly to the NWS, guess how the get their info to the weather guys? Yep 2 meter radio. Throughout the storms they fed hourly info in to the NWS. Accurate, concise and timely 1st hand info, instead of the homogenized generic NWS broadcasts.

Uncle Ben
01-06-2008, 10:51 PM
Found this on Mud while snooping around....interesting!

http://bb.bc4x4.com/showthread.php?t=122797

DaveInDenver
01-07-2008, 09:00 AM
I've noticed that my 2mtr works better receiving NWS broadcast than my CB.
BTW, I made a mistake, there are only 7 NWS frequencies (the 7800 has the WX alert, the 8800 required them to be programmed in).

162.400
162.425
162.450
162.475
162.500
162.525
162.550

Uncle Ben
01-07-2008, 09:17 AM
BTW, I made a mistake, there are only 7 NWS frequencies (the 7800 has the WX alert, the 8800 required them to be programmed in).

162.400
162.425
162.450
162.475
162.500
162.525
162.550

More specifically...

162.475 - Alamosa(P)
162.475 - Colorado Springs
162.550 - Denver
162.550 - Grand Junction
162.400 - Greeley
162.550 - Longmont
162.400 - Pueblo
162.400 - Sterling


And still even more specifically...
http://www.weather.gov/nwr/CntyCov/nwrCO.htm

DaveInDenver
01-07-2008, 09:55 AM
More specifically...

162.475 - Alamosa(P)
162.475 - Colorado Springs
162.550 - Denver
162.550 - Grand Junction
162.400 - Greeley
162.550 - Longmont
162.400 - Pueblo
162.400 - Sterling

True, thanks Kevin. You put these 7 frequencies into memory and you can scan them no matter where you might be located in the USA. If there's a NWS station close, it will be on one of these.

Uncle Ben
01-27-2008, 01:14 PM
New question that I'm surprised has not come up yet. I am already tired of yaking with the same old folks that sit in the basement in their tightie whities! :rolleyes: It would be awesome if we as a club chose a "home" frequency that we would all monitor when we are in our vehicles besides 145.145 (the tighty whitie freq! :rolleyes:) I know it has been said that we would use the 146.460 freq when 4 wheeling and if .145 is busy .310 as back up. I would like to ping in on a freq that others in our talk circle might also be on when they happen to be in their vehicles or HT's and possibly rag chew at un-scheduled times! Monday nights just don't always work for me! What say the masters? :confused: ;)

Seldom Seen
01-27-2008, 01:43 PM
I understand and agree. 145 became the default 'cuz its the designated "rag chew" freq for the Denver area. It's a good place to go when starting out, but gets old fast.

310 is is OK to monitor but not a place to rag chew. You have to remember that if using it for local comms your QSO will be heard through out the state. If someone in Durango is trying to contact someone in Glenwood they might get miffed, nothing 'wrong' with it, just not good practice

340 is the IRLP CQ machine so not good for local use,

225 is the local "net" freq so it only is used for comms between net times.

805 is IRLP enabled, but the machine seems under used and might be a good home.

Uncle Ben
01-27-2008, 02:09 PM
I understand and agree. 145 became the default 'cuz its the designated "rag chew" freq for the Denver area. It's a good place to go when starting out, but gets old fast.

310 is is OK to monitor but not a place to rag chew. You have to remember that if using it for local comms your QSO will be heard through out the state. If someone in Durango is trying to contact someone in Glenwood they might get miffed, nothing 'wrong' with it, just not good practice

340 is the IRLP CQ machine so not good for local use,

225 is the local "net" freq so it only is used for comms between net times.

805 is IRLP enabled, but the machine seems under used and might be a good home.



You bring up another good point Brian. When I first started using my FT-8800 that at that time was borrowed from a friend I had no idea of what transceivers were differant than others. I assumed all radios had two freq monitoring. Later when I learned more I leaned towards buying a 7800 because the backlit buttons made sense. Nakman was the one who opened my eyes and pointed out the luxury of two freqs vrs one (8800 vrs 7800) I went ahead and bought my buds 8800 at that point! Right now my machine is set at 5.145 and 5.310 so I monitor both freqs when I'm in my Cruiser in case one of you all pop up on one or the other. I have rag chewed on 5.310 with a couple wheelers on the western slope that have popped up mainly because of the dual freq monitoring and easily switchable "main" freq. That all just justifies my choices but it relates to my original point that we need a freq we call home as I know we all would chat more if we could ping in during our commute to or from work whenever! I have no desire to become a full time Ham geek but I do enjoy chatting with my friends! I would monitor 5.310 and 6.460 all the time I'm in the truck if I knew others in RS or across the state would do the same! I think we are all capable of DCS too which would really keep the cross chatter off the speaker and only those of us who chime in would play.......something to ponder for sure!

Seldom Seen
01-27-2008, 03:52 PM
I'm not super familiar with the 8800, maybe Tim, Dave or Chris will chime in. Check out your owners manual and see if you can do a split/scan.

ie; you can set 1 side to scan all the active repeaters in the metro area with a chosen (say 805) as your "home" or priority freq. then channelize the other side with the Colo. Conn. machines.

nakman
01-27-2008, 10:29 PM
I hear you Kev, it would be sweet if our little community had its own repeater that worked across the front range, where we could all hang by default and be a little less apprehensive about speaking up. In fact keep your eyes open, if someone were to stumble across the equipment necessary to build our own setup, I'd gladly donate the hillside & power to keep it running. Heck maybe the club will decide to buy all this stuff some day.. still kicking myself that we didn't grab that 40' tower than was available a while back, but alas I didn't own any land then.

But I am like you, I typically monitor 145.145 on one, and 145.310 on the other, though lately I've been listening to 146.805 instead of .310 because that's one of the repeaters that lets people monkey around with the IRLP stuff... like when we do the Expeditions Portal stuff that's the channel you go on, then Ricardo or Blake will push the magic buttons and we're on the Western Reflector. But point being, it's a little more interesting over on 146.805 than .145 or .310.

However, just about every time I start talking with someone on .145 the guy on the other end has been super cool, and half the time they live in Bailey and we'll often discover we know the same people. In fact a couple of them are threatening to drop in on our meeting next month

Uncle Ben
01-27-2008, 10:43 PM
Ya I have talked with a Dan and a Doug from Baily 0n .145 . Dan is on quite a bit in fact. Seem like nice enough fellows but I would rather be chatting with one of you guys! Has any one messed with the DCS encoding yet? Our own repeater would be cool but a little more geeky than I want to get into right now. Michelle might have something to say about the new metal "tree" that popped up in the back yard too!
BTW....I scored a Yaesu VX-7r with extra battery at the pawn shop a little over a week ago! Haven't played with it much but it's pretty cool! I couldn't pass it up for only $150! Guy at the PS said he had it for a while and no one knew what it was! He Googled it and found out it was an HT but thats all he knew! It seems to be in great shape and it does work....in fact I was listening to you guys rag chew last monday while cleaning the garage! I tried to beep in but no one heard me or you ignored me! :rolleyes: ;) I might have not had the tone set correctly either. I ordered a manual and downloaded a PDF manual so I can figure it out. I'll try it if I can tomorrow night at the rag chew.....

I hear you Kev, it would be sweet if our little community had its own repeater that worked across the front range, where we could all hang by default and be a little less apprehensive about speaking up. In fact keep your eyes open, if someone were to stumble across the equipment necessary to build our own setup, I'd gladly donate the hillside & power to keep it running. Heck maybe the club will decide to buy all this stuff some day.. still kicking myself that we didn't grab that 40' tower than was available a while back, but alas I didn't own any land then.

But I am like you, I typically monitor 145.145 on one, and 145.310 on the other, though lately I've been listening to 146.805 instead of .310 because that's one of the repeaters that lets people monkey around with the IRLP stuff... like when we do the Expeditions Portal stuff that's the channel you go on, then Ricardo or Blake will push the magic buttons and we're on the Western Reflector. But point being, it's a little more interesting over on 146.805 than .145 or .310.

However, just about every time I start talking with someone on .145 the guy on the other end has been super cool, and half the time they live in Bailey and we'll often discover we know the same people. In fact a couple of them are threatening to drop in on our meeting next month

nakman
01-27-2008, 10:57 PM
I don't think know them.. ham guys I know in Bailey are Dennis and LJ..


but yeah we'd have to be stealth about it, and put it back in the woods a bit. And hope the kid's hair doesn't stand on end while he's out on the swing set.

Uncle Ben
01-27-2008, 11:09 PM
Ya I have talked with a Dan and a Doug from Baily 0n .145 . Dan is on quite a bit in fact. Seem like nice enough fellows but I would rather be chatting with one of you guys! Has any one messed with the DCS encoding yet? Our own repeater would be cool but a little more geeky than I want to get into right now. Michelle might have something to say about the new metal "tree" that popped up in the back yard too!
BTW....I scored a Yaesu VX-7r with extra battery at the pawn shop a little over a week ago! Haven't played with it much but it's pretty cool! I couldn't pass it up for only $150! Guy at the PS said he had it for a while and no one knew what it was! He Googled it and found out it was an HT but thats all he knew! It seems to be in great shape and it does work....in fact I was listening to you guys rag chew last monday while cleaning the garage! I tried to beep in but no one heard me or you ignored me! :rolleyes: ;) I might have not had the tone set correctly either. I ordered a manual and downloaded a PDF manual so I can figure it out. I'll try it if I can tomorrow night at the rag chew.....

I also want to play with the cross band repeat feature just for fun to see how far this little HT can yak with the Cruiser backing it up! Anybody have a clue how to do that yet?

DaveInDenver
01-28-2008, 01:03 PM
With more people getting into ham, we should have a common repeater and I think the Rising Sun Ham Club is just the huckleberries to do it. We could charge a small fee to other clubs to use it. With Tim's free rent it wouldn't be expensive, although renting space on Lookout or Squaw would provide a ton more coverage.

BTW, that VX-7R was a steal, they are usually about $350.

146.805 is interesting during commutes. I'll get on once in a while when I'm driving at a decent time. Most of the drive-time people are radio and TV broadcast engineers, so that's interesting. They really don't talk about ham, but what broadcast towers they are working on, what stations, etc. They also talk about other stuff, hiking, skiing and just general B.S. It's pretty interest and not really a tighty-whitey crowd. I'd guess most of them are in their 30s and 40s, just working stiffs chatting on the way to work.

FWIW, I think we should designate a simplex channel to call home and then have a repeater progression. It's best to stay off 145.310 for local stuff since it does tie up the linked repeaters with chit-chat relevant only to Denver.

Groucho
01-28-2008, 01:33 PM
We have sort-of "adopted" the 146.460 MhZ freq for trail runs. That came from the NorCal Guys using that freq.

Nakman and I chatted with another HAM on the way home from CM2007 on 146.520 about setting up our own repeater that could be raised and lowered on a trailer for Cruise Moab. That way, we would have a temporary repeater that we would have to coordinate with the local guys on freq and such, put it up on Poison Spider Mesa and viola! Our own CM repeater!

Dave, have you had any experience with those things(repeaters)? I know most guys get second(or third or fourth) hand stuff to start out with to make it less costly. Here is one I found on ebay. VHF Repeater (http://tinyurl.com/3a7f4c)

I would like to do this, but I'd be worried about all of the permission and stuff we'd have to go through to make it all possible.

Anybody's thoughts?

DaveInDenver
01-28-2008, 01:59 PM
Dave, have you had any experience with those things(repeaters)? I know most guys get second(or third or fourth) hand stuff to start out with to make it less costly. Here is one I found on ebay. VHF Repeater (http://tinyurl.com/3a7f4c)

I would like to do this, but I'd be worried about all of the permission and stuff we'd have to go through to make it all possible.

Anybody's thoughts?
Never set up a repeater. I think the biggest issue is getting an open frequency pair, the rest we could figure out. What would be cool is if we could convince Tim to give us Internet access and make the Rising Sun repeater an IRLP node. I think setting one up at one of our mountain member's homes makes sense. Once it's dialed in, moving it to a commercial tower is relatively easier. Don't want to be shaking out a repeater and causing all kinds of interference with Fox31, you know.

I was thinking it probably wouldn't be too tough to find a GE Mastr repeater, that's a pretty standard part. There's probably lots of other controllers, Motorola for sure. Not to mention the Tait you linked to, probably ICOM, Kenwood, Vertex also make repeater parts.

http://www.repeater-builder.com/rbtip/

Crawler#976
01-28-2008, 02:33 PM
If you guy's can pull off a portable club repeater or a dedicated club repeater that would be sweet!

K0FXF is available...

K0RS K0RSC aren't