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Hants
03-10-2008, 05:52 PM
I've assembled most of the components, and I'm soon going to be doing a bunch of heavy-gauge wiring on my LX.

Does anyone have (or know where I could "use") a bench crimper for #4 and 1/0 gauge wire?

I've heard that West Marine has them for use (if you buy "stuff" from them), but I'm not sure if the one off the 470 does?

TIA! :beer:

nuclearlemon
03-10-2008, 06:00 PM
bfh and a punch.

Tch2fly
03-10-2008, 06:06 PM
I've assembled most of the components, and I'm soon going to be doing a bunch of heavy-gauge wiring on my LX.

Does anyone have (or know where I could "use") a bench crimper for #4 and 1/0 gauge wire?

I've heard that West Marine has them for use (if you buy "stuff" from them), but I'm not sure if the one off the 470 does?

TIA! :beer:

I drive by everyday, I can stop and ask if you want.

Why not solder?
I have have always been told it is the preferred method. I did it on all my heavy duty wiring (dual batts, rear power, etc) and I have had zero issue.

Hants
03-10-2008, 06:18 PM
Thanks, Mike. Yes, please.

All of my research led me to conclude that high-quality crimps (all the way around with high pressure) are the way I want to go.

I've got the cable & all of the accessories, except for the lugs.

My options in preferential order:

1. "Borrow" a bench crimper from a club member (with all of the 80's & 100's in the club, I figure its likely SOMEONE already has one).

2. Buy my lugs from West Marine and spend a day up there doing the final install.

3. Pony up for one (not attractive, as it is for basically one-time use).

corsair23
03-10-2008, 11:10 PM
Hants....

Remember this thread? --> 2 ga Cable/Wire Crimping (http://www.risingsun4x4club.org/forum2/showthread.php?t=3534) :D


West Marine does in fact have the bench and tools needed to do the job and I believe Matt put the stuff to use when he did his winch install recently.

For me, I went ahead and bought a "swager (http://www.aircraftspruce.com/catalog/topages/swagingtool.php)" that seemed to have done the trick for me and my issue I had (see the above thread). Not sure it will do 1/0 cable but it handled the 2 ga no problem. You're welcome to borrow it but its likely to cost more in gas than just picking one up. IIRC it was ~$35 and the only negative really was that it takes awhile to get it all lined up and tighten down the bolts. At the time I did the repair I considered it a temporary fix but it has been like this since last year. There is little to no stress on the connection and the liquid black tape stuff works perfectly to seal out moisture etc.

HTH

Hulk
03-10-2008, 11:44 PM
West Marine has a crimper that I have used on several occasions.

Location: County Line Road between Quebec and Holly.

Beater
03-11-2008, 06:36 AM
2nd vote for solder. get a pencil tip for your propane, a tub of flux and heat, dip, heat, solder, repeat

RockRunner
03-11-2008, 08:11 AM
So I'm not much of an electrical person so please correct me if I am wrong.

What I have done in the past has been to crimp on the part and then solder it afterwards. Then either shrink or the liquid goo. Is this overkill or ????

I am going to be adding a second battery soon and will need to do the same.

DaveInDenver
03-11-2008, 08:15 AM
I feel you really need to crimp and solder the connection. I use the dull center punch and hammer method for crimping (that's exactly what an hammer indentor tool is doing) and solder for the corrosion protection. But it's important to crimp for the mechanical connection and the soldering is secondary and wrapping the crimp with Coax Seal or using shrink wrap is an alternative. If you solder, using shrink is redundant, but does look nicer.

BTW, you can make your own die-style swaging crimper using a set of bolt cutters and an old 6 point socket. Cut the socket in half long-wise and weld it to the jaws of the bolt cutters. This is how we made our crimpers at a panel shop that I used to work, we had a set of swaging crimpers that cost us $150 for all 4 (6mm, 8mm, 10mm, 12mm). IIRC, for 4AWG lugs you would use a 6mm or 8mm socket for 1/0 lugs, a 10mm socket.

Uncle Ben
03-11-2008, 08:20 AM
All smaller gauge wiring I do is soldered and heat shrank. High amp load wiring should be swagged. This is an old argument.....Google is your friend!

Red_Chili
03-11-2008, 08:36 AM
I have a bench crimper. Does far better than a hammer and punch. But I have no 80 nor 100 so I guess that leaves me out!
:lmao:

This week is jammed, but if you swing by next week (late-ish in the week) I should have time. To finish you should use meltable liner, and heatshrink over that.

DaveInDenver
03-11-2008, 08:42 AM
All smaller gauge wiring I do is soldered and heat shrank. High amp load wiring should be swagged. This is an old argument.....Google is your friend!
Just FWIW, most codes (MIL-STD, UL, NEC, etc.) don't allow the use of solder only without crimp unless you add mechanical support, like a cable clamp, terminal wrap or connector back shells. Most flight hardware relies on crimped connections, no soldering. So I suppose good enough for satellites, good enough for old white Toyotas. Still, I prefer to solder as well, since here on Earth we have an atmosphere (and mag chloride!) and corrosion resistance is important. If you really want to be bored, read NASA-STD-8739.3 (soldered) and NASA-STD-8739.4 (crimped interconnects) on how interconnects must be made for flight systems. Snooze. The old question of swaging verses dimple crimps, both achieve similar goals and one may or may not be preferred over the other. Swaging is generally better because it's more uniform, but some lugs are designed for an indention crimp and that might be the right method. Sorry for the brain dump, feel free to ignore if you want.

Uncle Ben
03-11-2008, 08:44 AM
I have a bench crimper. Does far better than a hammer and punch. But I have no 80 nor 100 so I guess that leaves me out!
:lmao:

Hate it when your bench gets crimped! Great quote!


To finish you should use meltable liner, and heatshrink over that.

100% agreement!!

Red_Chili
03-11-2008, 10:32 AM
FWIW, my bench crimper is hammer driven and not swage. WFLLT

Hants
03-11-2008, 03:50 PM
Thanks, Guys!

Jeff - Yes, I shuffle way too much through my brain -- doesn't seem to hold as well as it used to. :bawl:

Matt - I'll stop by (again -- see comment above), and chat them up. Probably the easiest solution to schedule. I'll be passing by tomorrow on the way to the CM meeting. :grinpimp:

Dave - Now you're telling me I need to learn to weld & get a welding rig so I can wire up my LX. :dunno: :weld:

Bill - Thanks for the offer. My schedule from here to CM is pretty crazy. If I can't get to it before CM, I'll see if we can coordinate some time. :thumb:

Kevin - Yup, got the triple-wall stuff. :)

DaveInDenver
03-11-2008, 04:05 PM
Dave - Now you're telling me I need to learn to weld & get a welding rig so I can wire up my LX.
Huh?

Hants
03-11-2008, 04:15 PM
BTW, you can make your own die-style swaging crimper using a set of bolt cutters and an old 6 point socket. Cut the socket in half long-wise and weld it to the jaws of the bolt cutters.


:hill:


:beer:

DaveInDenver
03-11-2008, 04:49 PM
:hill:


:beer:

:doh:

corsair23
03-11-2008, 05:05 PM
Jeff - Yes, I shuffle way too much through my brain -- doesn't seem to hold as well as it used to. :bawl:

:lmao:

Well if you want to borrow the swager let me know. Chances I'll get around to using it between now and CM08 for what I want to do are slim to nill :o.

I'd bet West Marine would let you use their stuff no questions asked :thumb:. Pretty nice guys despite the overpriced parts. When I was there last time I inquired about the possibility of them offering the club a discount which the guy quickly dismissed...Chris seems to have an in with them though :D