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RicardoJM
06-22-2008, 10:53 PM
After researching various sources for new front cylinders for my drum brakes and realizing that it would be about $300, I decided to move in the direction of getting disc brakes up front. Drum brakes work just fine and if it were not for my odd build date and front cylinder sourcing issues I would have stayed with the drum brakes. As I tally up the conversion costs, they will definitely exceed $300, but I am looking forward to getting my 40 back on the road and having the "upgraded" brakes. :D

I looked into a couple of front axles from late 70s FJ40s and a couple of front axles from mid-80's FJ60s. As things turned out Thursday evening, I picked up an 60 series axle that was just a mile from the house. Here is is after we unloaded it from the 100. These things are heavy.

http://www.risingsun4x4club.org/uploads/ricardojm/disc_brake_conversion/w_01_axle_at_home.jpg

We pulled it out of a weed patch and it is a little dirty, but so far the only issue I found is one of the hubs must have taken a real shot to have caused the dial to break like this.

http://www.risingsun4x4club.org/uploads/ricardojm/disc_brake_conversion/w_05_broken_hub.jpg

Looks like for some time someone used pliers to lock and unlock. The tell-tale signs of scoring are real clear on the cleaned up dial. I'm on the look out for a new dial (or hub) so that I can make it good as new. If you have one or can point me in the right direction to find one, I would appreciate it.

Today I started to strip off the parts that I will need for the conversion. Everything from the knuckles on out will need to be removed. This includes the steering arms. By the end of today I managed to get this far along on the tear down.

http://www.risingsun4x4club.org/uploads/ricardojm/disc_brake_conversion/w_02_hub_rotors_off.jpg

Lest, you think I am the slowest wrench in the club (ok - I likely am the slowest:snail:) I've also been using the parts the washer to clean them up as they come off. The cleaning of the parts takes the most time on this job but it is quite nice to be able to just toss them in and go to town getting all the grime and grease off.

http://www.risingsun4x4club.org/uploads/ricardojm/disc_brake_conversion/w_03_parts_in_the_tub.jpg

Even with a washer, the calipers and rotors could not be cleaned up enough to go back on. Even if they would clean up, I will be much more confident in new parts for these components. From that perspective, here is today's bounty in cores.

http://www.risingsun4x4club.org/uploads/ricardojm/disc_brake_conversion/w_04_cores_for_new.jpg

I'll continue to post updates on my progress and will likely need some help with aspects of this before it is all said and done. My wheel bearing packing party experience yielded big dividends today. I was very comfortable with all of the wrenching needed to get this far.

Mendocino
06-23-2008, 07:49 AM
Cool Ricardo:thumb: Disc brakes are good.:D

Cresso
06-23-2008, 02:34 PM
I'm just about to button up this same exact swap, although I used a minitruck axle donor. I need to put in the pads and bleed the brakes and I'm done. I was pulling a few parts that I missed down at Pull-n-Save and saw good Aisin hubs on just about every 4runner down there.

wesintl
06-23-2008, 03:18 PM
I have a dial you can have off an ifs rig. The dial is not raised (the thumb turn dealyo's) like the 60 ones but will work fine until you get a matching one or I think i have a pair and they can be matched. I'll look tonight

Rzeppa
06-23-2008, 07:36 PM
Nice write up Ricardo and thanks for sharing! No kidding loaded axles are heavy, especially with the 3rd member still attached!

I'm like you as far as taking my time cleaning everything up as I go along. Makes for much easier re-assemble. Don't forget a good coat of rattle-can paint!

Glad the WBPP was helpful. My first one was to me too, and helps take the scary away from diving into stuff with little more than a manual and some hand tools.

The locking hub looks like normal rock-rash. Nothing a little cleaning up with a dremel won't cure :-)

You might consider pulling the 3rd and the sway bar off the axle just to make it a little easier to heft around. OTOH, you needed a new set of free weights to work out with anyway, right?

subzali
06-23-2008, 07:46 PM
Jeff, did you see the crack in the dial of the hub?

I've gotten good at loading fully built axles out of my red truck with my dad's tractor and fork :D

Rzeppa
06-23-2008, 07:50 PM
Jeff, did you see the crack in the dial of the hub?

It's just a flesh wound :-)

No I didn't - JB Weld? =-O

Okay, time for a new dial...

wesintl
06-23-2008, 09:03 PM
Ricardo, I did a quick check in the garage and I could find any. I might have given my last set to TJ. If no one else posts up the yota yard usually has a box of em. I'm sure you can get one for reasonable.

RicardoJM
06-23-2008, 09:25 PM
Wes, thanks for looking. Sounds like a trip to Yota yard or the Pull-n-Save is in my future.

This evening I pulled out both birfields and axles. After wiping the grease off of them I realized I did not pick up a pickle fork to separate the steering arm from the steering rod:o - guess I'll get the pickle fork tomorrow. My progress was limited to removing all of the nuts, bolts and washers and starting them soaking in the washer.

Tomorrow evening I should be complete with the tear down process and able to take the next couple of evenings to clean parts and rattle can the iron. Thanks for all the warm thoughts and help. :)

wesintl
06-23-2008, 09:32 PM
I guess you don't need to save the tre but a bearing puller does a nicer job and doesn't ruin the boots. I have both if you need to use...

I'll do a more through look for you. I swore I had a least one. I'll let you know if I find it.

Rzeppa
06-23-2008, 11:33 PM
Totally agree with Wes about the puller versus pickle fork. Used both and there's no comparison. OTOH, all I own is a pickle fork so that is what I do most of my TREs with. TRE puller's on the list along there with a press, plasma cutter...gotta keep prioritizing :-)

Bit of advice: Often one of the most difficult parts of this job are getting the steering arms off the knuckles. Factory (or work-alike) SST would rock for getting that sucker off. I will say that a couple I have done came off (relatively) easy, but once they've been on there for a couple decades they can be some work.

Do the bottom retainers first, for whatever reason they always come off easier, then you can pound a drift up on the underside of the steering arm seat. Like I wrote, sometimes they come off reasonable, other times they can be a bear.

Cresso
06-24-2008, 09:50 AM
The technique recommended in the Toyota manual worked really well for me. Use a brass punch and hit the tops of the steering arm studs, like you're trying to pound them down through the arms. A few good whacks and the conical washers will pop out. Also works well for the conical washers on the hubs.

RicardoJM
06-24-2008, 11:48 AM
I have a gear puller that should work in place of the pickle fork. We'll find out tonight just how easy/hard the cone washer come out on the top and bottom caps. I think I'm in good shape on the bottoms as they easily seprated 1/8" once the nuts were removed.

I just got off the phone with Kurt at Cruiser Outfitters and have part number FA7590 (front axle kit, including trunion bearings) and new Timken wheel bearings and the Marlin heavy duty inner axle seals on the way. They should arrive on Friday.

Still need to order the new calipers and rotors, but expect to also have them on Friday.

I'm not too excited about all the pounding to seat the new bearing races in the hub and seat the wheel stud bolts. Does anyone know of a shop on the south end with a press that would do this?

wesintl
06-24-2008, 12:06 PM
Just use the old race to set the new race and be careful not to get it too off center when it goes in or score the race surface. Otherwise your fine. I've always set mine like that.
Toyota usually has equivelant $ on reman calipers. rotors can be turned by carquest or napa unless they are too thin.

I can stop by one day after work and show you how to set the races if you want

oh.. the knuckle studs cone washers use a brass punch to tap on the studs. The cone washer will loosen right up.(you know, right before they shear ;) )

are you using a knuckle centering tool to put the new knuckles on your 40 housing?

RicardoJM
06-24-2008, 01:25 PM
are you using a knuckle centering tool to put the new knuckles on your 40 housing?

I've used the old races to put on the new ones while listening for the distinctive ping for when it fully seats. In a moment of weakness while writing the thought of doing it 4 times and then having to deal with another 12 rounds with the bfh on the studs brought out the wimp in me. I suppose I'll "Toyota man up" and get it done. :D

Regarding the knuckle centering tool, I've not tried to get access to one. In my research the prevailing consensus has been that I'll be close enough reusing the shims from the FJ60 provided I am very careful about putting each one in the same location and orientation as it came off. As an added measure, I will be using the inner axle seal from Marlin that has a reputation for providing a better seal in those cases where the centering may not be exactly perfect. Seems like a good idea now, of course I'll be saying "what was I thinking?" if next year I'm jumping back in there because the seal starts leaking.

This might make an interesting poll question, for others that have done the disc brake conversion - did you use a knuckle centering tool or re-use the shims as they came off?

wesintl
06-24-2008, 01:35 PM
This might make an interesting poll question, for others that have done the disc brake conversion - did you use a knuckle centering tool or re-use the shims as they came off?

If you are just rebuilding the knuckle on the existing housing reusing the shims or replacing them with new ones with the same thinkness's is fine (at least IMHO) if you are putting the 60 knuckles on a different housing (like your 40) you need to measure it or build your own tool so the knuckle is centered properly. Last thing you want to do is rebuild the whole thing over again if it's causing seal failure because it's not shimmed properly. The marlin seals are better but if it's off enough they can fail. I wouldn't risk it esp when subzali has a tool.

subzali
06-24-2008, 02:01 PM
I haven't done a knuckle conversion yet, but if/when I do I will be using the tool to recenter the knuckles (since I now own it, but have it loaned out right now). But in your case it'd be easier to use the current shims like you said. My inner axle seals lasted about two years before they started leaking, and that was with a lot of wheeling, standard seals, and 0.012+ off to one side. I think you will be good for a few years.

Just pound the races in with a lead shot rubber mallet, using the tip Wes gave. With the studs you can tighten the lug nuts and it will suck the studs into place.

Rzeppa
06-24-2008, 03:29 PM
The technique recommended in the Toyota manual worked really well for me. Use a brass punch and hit the tops of the steering arm studs, like you're trying to pound them down through the arms. A few good whacks and the conical washers will pop out. Also works well for the conical washers on the hubs.

I've never had any trouble getting the cone washers off. It is getting the steering arm seat out of the knuckle bearing inner race that often gives me fits.

subzali
06-24-2008, 04:21 PM
The last time I did my front axle service was the first time that was an issue for me - ended up breaking the knuckle bearings to get the things out...

Cresso
06-24-2008, 04:23 PM
I've never had any trouble getting the cone washers off. It is getting the steering arm seat out of the knuckle bearing inner race that often gives me fits.

Ohhh, I see. Mine lifted right off once the cone washers were out. Didn't realize I got lucky there.

wesintl
06-24-2008, 05:47 PM
I've never had any trouble getting the cone washers off. It is getting the steering arm seat out of the knuckle bearing inner race that often gives me fits.

I've always used a brass drift to knock out the bottom one out throught the side of the knuckle then use it vertically through the bottom of the one just removed to knock out the top one.

RicardoJM
06-24-2008, 09:46 PM
So here is my disc brake knuckle goodness getting ready to be cleaned up. The shims are on the posts right where they were. For me it will be easier to keep the orientation and placement correct - just have to make sure they don't accidentally slip off through the cleaning process.

http://www.risingsun4x4club.org/uploads/ricardojm/disc_brake_conversion/w_knuckle_goodness.jpg

Thanks for all the tips on getting the cone washers off. The bottom ones loosened up with a couple of taps on the knuckle body. I basically used the wesintl method to tap out the bottom and then pop out the top.

I tried using my puller but could not get the puller arms and bolt to line up straight enough to stay centered as the puller engaged. I'm thinking I may really need a pickle fork to get them separated. This is how the passenger side one currently looks. The driver side is just the same, just on the other side of the long pole.

http://www.risingsun4x4club.org/uploads/ricardojm/disc_brake_conversion/w_steering_arms_stuck.jpg

On the good news side, the pile of parts that have gone through the washer is growing. The dust covers may need a bit more work to get the hazy dust off before hitting up with some spray paint.

http://www.risingsun4x4club.org/uploads/ricardojm/disc_brake_conversion/w_cleaned_up.jpg

Martin, you expressed a need for the 3rd member, it's yours for the taking:cheers:. PM me to arrange getting it, only thing is I (my wife) would appreciate it if you also take the axle housing as well. It should be a bit lighter than when I picked it up, but it is still heavy enough to hold down those jack stands.

http://www.risingsun4x4club.org/uploads/ricardojm/disc_brake_conversion/w_martins_stuff.jpg

Rzeppa
06-24-2008, 10:01 PM
Wow Ricardo! I've seen a lot of rear steer setups over the years but this one is pretty unique!

http://www.risingsun4x4club.org/uploads/ricardojm/disc_brake_conversion/w_steering_arms_stuck.jpg

wesintl
06-28-2008, 03:51 PM
found em ricardo, let me know if you still need em.

RicardoJM
06-28-2008, 08:48 PM
The front axle rebuild kit and bearings arrived. It is going to be nice to have all the new innards. The old bearings would be ok to put back in but as they likely have fewer good days ahead of them than new ones - it seemed reasonable to go ahead and put in new ones at this time. The old ones will make good spares. Here are all the parts that arrived today.

http://www.risingsun4x4club.org/uploads/ricardojm/disc_brake_conversion/w_front_rebuild_stuff.jpg

I also started painting the iron and should complete that in the next couple of days. Wes, I may reach out and take you up on the puller and dials. That said, I should be able to make it out to the yard this week for a dial(s). I stopped by a place on S Santa Fe Thursday evening. They had a 60 but someone had already pulled the dials.

My plan is to remove everything from the front of the 40 this week and to put all the new stuff on this Saturday. I've put in an inquiry on the knuckle centering tool thread to see if I can borrow the SST. Better to measure and be sure than that to just re-use the old and not really know it it is off. :D

Shark Bait
06-28-2008, 09:40 PM
Ricardo, what are you using for steering arms again? :p:

MDH33
06-28-2008, 09:59 PM
Martin, you expressed a need for the 3rd member, it's yours for the taking:cheers:. PM me to arrange getting it, only thing is I (my wife) would appreciate it if you also take the axle housing as well. It should be a bit lighter than when I picked it up, but it is still heavy enough to hold down those jack stands.



Yes sir, I'll take it along with the housing. I'll try to set something up for early this week. Thanks! :thumb:

RicardoJM
06-29-2008, 12:44 PM
Ricardo, what are you using for steering arms again? :p:

I found this thread (http://forum.ih8mud.com/40-55-series-tech/137225-minitruck-front-axle-disc-brake-conversion-dummies-faq.html) to be particularly valuable in doing the swap. In post #36, there are three options listed. I will be using the steering arms from the 60 and going with option #2, using the starter bushing part # SBO to account for the different taper. This post (http://www.pirate4x4.com/forum/showthread.php?s=&threadid=136579&highlight=bushing) shows how to get the bushing in place.

RicardoJM
06-29-2008, 12:53 PM
After researching a bit more, I found that I may have been expecting too much from my puller. It really won't pull the steering arm off, it is best used to put pressure on the connection so that when you tap the side of the steering arm it "pops" right off. This morning I went out to try this technique and one side came right off. The other side took a bit of work, but it also came off. The steering arms are in the parts washer soaking a bit. :D

RicardoJM
06-29-2008, 10:18 PM
Progress continued today with separating the steering arms from the rod, banging out the old bearing races and getting some paint on the iron parts. Here are the knuckles, steering arms and inner hubs.

http://www.risingsun4x4club.org/uploads/ricardojm/disc_brake_conversion/w_painted_parts.jpg

The right knuckle.

http://www.risingsun4x4club.org/uploads/ricardojm/disc_brake_conversion/w_painted_right_knuckle.jpg

The left knuckle.

http://www.risingsun4x4club.org/uploads/ricardojm/disc_brake_conversion/w_painted_left_knuckle.jpg

The paint job will not win any awards, but it is nice to see these shine versus the grimy patina they had when removed. If nothing else being able to clearly see the R and L minimize the chances that I'll put them on the wrong side. ;)

RicardoJM
07-01-2008, 09:07 PM
Wes and Cresso, thanks for the lead on where I could find new caps:thumb:. I found these from an IFS 4-runner at the pull-n-save for $4.45. Wes, thanks for the offer of your dials, but I am set. Here are the "new old caps" on the locking hub body.

http://www.risingsun4x4club.org/uploads/ricardojm/disc_brake_conversion/w_newold_caps.jpg

Granted, they are not much to look at but with a bit of scrubbing and some new paint and they will be lookers - most important they work. They are smooth and solid in the rotation. For the technical content, most of the components of the Aisin locking hubs are interchangeable across the years. There is a bunch of information out there, but I found this article (http://www.off-road.com/offroad/article/articleDetail.jsp?id=399668)to be very educating.

I still need to pick up a proportioning valve, but new calipers and rotors are in place and ready to go.

http://www.risingsun4x4club.org/uploads/ricardojm/disc_brake_conversion/w_new_hardware.jpg

Rzeppa
07-01-2008, 10:46 PM
Hey Ricardo, are you going to rebuild that center arm or did I miss that?

RicardoJM
07-02-2008, 07:13 AM
Hey Ricardo, are you going to rebuild that center arm or did I miss that?

Did you mean "knuckle centering tool"? I do intend to use a knuckle centering tool. There are two people on our forum that have this tool. Essentially the conversion to disc brakes up front includes a full knuckle rebuild. In most full knuckle rebuild cases people are not changing any of the major (axle, knuckle, shims) parts involved - and it makes sense that reusing the shims and being careful to put them in the same location will work. The difference here is that one of the major parts (axle) is new. In this circumstance, it is worth the time and effort to check that all the parts are in harmony and balance. :)

RicardoJM
07-08-2008, 08:48 AM
Almost a week and no update has been posted but that does not mean no progress has been made...

Jeff, I now understand about the center arm. It has not been done yet and is on the short list of projects but definitely needs to wait until after I get through with this one.

Thanks to Subzali, I will be using a knuckle centering tool to make sure I get the correct shims for the 60 series knuckles.

My birfield/axle separating tool worked. The long side axle was really smooth, two drops and it was out. The short side was not soo smooth, but it eventually separated as well. The ends of my pipe are a bit deformed from the ordeal. In my enthusiasm to use the tool, I neglected to really clean out the grease from the birfield housing. That first drop was a messy one. :p:

http://www.risingsun4x4club.org/uploads/ricardojm/disc_brake_conversion/w_birfsst.jpg

The FJ60 birfields have been cleaned up. Putting the cage and balls back in is one of the things from the WBPP that Crash helped me with. I took them apart and put them together several times after they were cleaned up so that I am now very familiar with how they go together. Hopefully, it just like learning the rubics cube, i.e. by the next time I have to do it again I will have forgotten.

The new wheel bearing races have all been put in place. I used the old races to get them seated. I also have the wheel studs in place. They still need to be fully seated as they have about 1/8" gap. For the last little bit, it will be a two person job; one to hold the housing while the other works the socket to seat the studs firm.

While the knuckle studs on the FJ60 doaner were all in good shape, I went ahead and replaced them with new ones purchased from Toyota. It is one of those things that didn't need to be done, but as long as I was in there it makes sense to go ahead and do. The new studs are nice and shiny and have a torx head so getting them installed was a breeze. A 11/32 socket is just the right size for the torx head.

http://www.risingsun4x4club.org/uploads/ricardojm/disc_brake_conversion/w_newknuclestuds.jpg

A technical note here, all threads are being coated with anti-seize as they go back in. Having dealt with snapped bolts because they have frozen in place has made me a firm believer in making sure whatever goes together will also come apart (if needed) without breaking.

I cleaned up the hub dials, sanded off the old paint, taped them off and put on some new color. It is not a standard issue color scheme, but I like it just fine as the outer ring is color coordinated with my bumper:hill:. While I was at it all the hub internals were taken apart cleaned, greased up and put back together. New o-rings were installed. The hubs are like new.

http://www.risingsun4x4club.org/uploads/ricardojm/disc_brake_conversion/w_paintedhubs.jpg

Last night I removed the knuckles and components from the drivers side axle on the FJ40. I'm having a bit of trouble getting the steering arm seperated from the tie rod, so I may end up borrowing Wes's puller. I just can't seem to get my puller to stay in place as it tightens up. Tonight I finished up the passenger side. Here it is ready for the FJ60 parts.

http://www.risingsun4x4club.org/uploads/ricardojm/disc_brake_conversion/w_readyfordisc.jpg

For all that are following and have lent a hand so far, thanks.
:risingsun

wesintl
07-08-2008, 10:18 AM
A technical note here, all threads are being coated with anti-sieze as they go back in. Having dealt with snapped bolts because they have frozen in place has made me a firm believer in making sure whatever goes together will also come apart (if needed) without breaking.

I'd be careful as to what your applying anti seize to. you don't want it on wheel studs and I can't think of anything else on the knuckle you want it on. I certainly wouldn't use it on your steering arm studs

RicardoJM
07-08-2008, 10:24 AM
I'd be careful as to what your applying anti seize to. you don't want it on wheel studs and I can't think of anything else on the knuckle you want it on. I certainly wouldn't use it on your steering arm studs

That is a good point, would not want the lug nuts to work their way off. I put it on the knuckle end of the steering arm studs where they seat down into the knuckle but will not use it on the top side.

subzali
07-08-2008, 12:38 PM
EDIT: use a real tie rod end puller..

BTW I think I have a center arm or two that I tried on my truck, thinking they were the culprit of my loose steering. Turns out it's my steering box, so these center arm(s) are probably in good shape. You can have one (or both) if you like, though a rebuild is easy and cheap too.

subzali
07-10-2008, 07:49 PM
Check out part #60 on This SOR page (http://www.sor.com/sor/cat086.tam?xax=18088&page%2Ectx=cat086%2Etam). What we were looking at IS a proportioning valve, though not seemingly adjustable and designed to have Toyota discs up front with the 7/8" bore wheel cylinders in the back.

I'm looking through the May/June '05 issue of Toyota Trails, and found this in the tech section (I'm chock full of these today :D)

...You will want to swap in a dual circuit master cylinder as well, and a vacuum booster too. This is where it gets a little more complicated. The clearance between the brake and clutch master cylinder was increased when the vacuum booster for power brakes was introduced. There is not quite enough room between them to install the booster in the older rigs like yours ('68 in this case). Solutions include: carefully fitting it in there with a little tweaking and (minimal) offsetting of the M/C...an adapter mount which is available from one or even two of our TLCA associate members (I (Mark) saw one on Ebay the other day as a matter of fact) which moves the brake booster and M/C further into the engine compartment to clear the clutch M/C...grafting a firewall section and pedal assembly from a later model rig into your vehicle (this is a lot of work but is fairly straightforward)...or maybe even using a hydro boost brake system adapted from one of the American rigs which used this approach (a bit complicated and requires a power steering pump to be mounted, but the booster is much small than the vacuum booster). I have had good luck with some careful fitting and minimal repositioning of the brake booster and M/C, and also with grafting a new section of firewall onto the rig. You are going to need to run some new hard lines and plan on doing some flaring and installing/swapping of line fittings...

:thumb:

RicardoJM
07-13-2008, 09:25 PM
Thanks to Subzali, I spent the afternoon working with the knuckle centering tool. My total shim need is 4.35 mm. This seems to be high, but I redid the measurements a couple of times. The new shims package total 2.8mm (4 .5mm and 4 .2mm) in size but Crash has a stash of shims he has collected over the years and thinks he may have the additional ones I need. Researching when Subzali did this he needed a total of 1.93mm (98 mm on the drivers side and .95 mm on the passenger side) of shims. The old shims from the FJ60 totaled 3mm, which is still more than what would come in a new shim package anyway.

For those of you that have put 60 knuckles on a 40 and used the SST to figure your shim needs - what did you end up needing?

As mentioned I rechecked all my measurements a couple of times and here is where I am at, on the drivers side my total shim need is for 2.37 mm (1.9 mm upper / .47 mm lower) and on the passenger side my total shim need is 1.98 (.97 mm upper / 1.01 mm lower).

Ideally, I will get 4 1mm shims from Crash's stash when I meet him for lunch tomorrow. With these and what I have in the new shim package, the following will go on the knuckles

Drivers Side
Need 1.9mm upper - use 2 1mm shims
Need .47mm lower - use 1 .4mm shim

Passenger Side
Need .97mm upper - use 1 1mm shim
Need 1.01mm lower - use 1 1mm shim

I'll likely go through the numbers one more time, it should go pretty quick the 3rd time around:p:. In any event I am feeling really good about taking the time to use the knuckle centering SST. Without it, I would have reused the shims from the FJ60 and been way off from what is needed for the combination of my old FJ40 axle housing and the new (to me) FJ60 knuckles and new trunion bearings. Of course, the pre-load test would have kept things from getting too far out of whack, but it is good to know it will be right.

Thanks Subzali, and it was great to catch you on the radio this morning. You were coming in full quieting on the repeater. :thumb:

RicardoJM
07-27-2008, 07:20 PM
After 3 weeks without knuckles, the FJ40 now has them again. I took last weekend off to do some fishing up in RMNP and got back around to working on the conversion this weekend. Yesterday, I grounded out the bell, put on the knuckles and tested the preload. Today, I got the axles and birfs put together only to find I should have grounded out the bell a bit more on the drivers side. No worries, took the knuckles off and hit it with the grinder just a bit more. Things are progressing, here is how it looks as of right now.

http://www.risingsun4x4club.org/uploads/ricardojm/disc_brake_conversion/w_going_back_together.jpg

As of this evening (07-28) the spindle and dust cover are back on and yes, I packed that bell and them knuckles with grease:D. I picked up a whole new tub for when my WBPP tub ran out.

http://www.risingsun4x4club.org/uploads/ricardojm/disc_brake_conversion/w_spindle_dustcover_on.jpg

The evening of 08-04, I got the hubs, rotor and caliper on.
http://www.risingsun4x4club.org/uploads/ricardojm/disc_brake_conversion/w_hubs_halfway.jpg

http://www.risingsun4x4club.org/uploads/ricardojm/disc_brake_conversion/w_all_done.jpg

RicardoJM
08-14-2008, 11:16 PM
With the exception of installing the proportioning valve, I finally have the conversion buttoned up. I did have a challenge regarding my wheel bearing preload. When I put the hub and rotors on my pre-load was well over 20lbs. The spec should be much closer to 12. I took the rig for a short ride (maybe 5 miles) and when I put my hand to the hubs they were hot, very hot. I was very certain that I had all the parts in the right place, I had checked and rechecked everything when I encountered the high pre-load.

I was a bit stumped, but the more I thought about the parts involved it occured to me that I had reused the claw washer and nuts from the FJ60. At one point I had considered getting new ones, because it was clear someone had used the chisel method of removal/tightening - but decided they were ok. In retrospect, it should have been obvious these needed to be replaced with new. Here is a picture of the old claw washers.
http://www.risingsun4x4club.org/uploads/ricardojm/disc_brake_conversion/w_badclaw.jpg

Notice the groove made by the old bearings. This groove is what was causing my tight bearing pre-load. The groove allowed the washer to put more inward pressure on the bearings. After replacing the claw washer and nuts with new ones, my pre-load is right on spec. If you do a front axle job and replace your wheel bearings, I would recommend you also get new claw washers.

Rzeppa
08-15-2008, 10:09 AM
If the groove was only on one side you could have just turned them around so the non-grooved side was against the inner race. But new ones never hurt. Glad you got that sorted out.