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CardinalFJ60
07-20-2008, 11:39 AM
I took a stab at replacing the carb, and to my pleasant surprise, it's reeeaaally easy. But here's a little writeup anyway.

Prep and parts:

Started with a cold engine and collected the following parts and tools:

Parts:
replacement Carb
extra Vacuum line
masking tape and Sharpie

Tools:
12mm Stubby for the carb base nuts
12mm socket/rachet for the Air Cleaner brackets
17mm open end wrench for hard fuel line to carb
Phillips head screwdriver for the choke cable screw.

Here's what you get when Jim rebuilds the carb(the pretty carb, and notes on what he did):

CardinalFJ60
07-20-2008, 11:48 AM
1. take lots of pictures from all kinds of angles

2. Start labeling the vac lines. I indicated lines to the Carb with a "C", and to the Air Cleaner with an "A". (1A, 2A, 1C, 2C, etc.).

3. mark the corresponding places on the new carb and on the Air Cleaner



4. Remove Lines being mindful of ones in cruddy condition. Replace as necessary. (hint:there's one hiding under the Air Cleaner)

5. Remove entire Air Cleaner assembly.

CardinalFJ60
07-20-2008, 11:54 AM
At this point, we'll start removing the carb:

1. remove choke cable. It's on the back of the carb.
2. remove linkage from the little snap on ball on the carb. Not sure if this helped, but I removed the little cotter pin further up the linkage to reach it better. Watch out, there's a spring there.
3. remove (4) 12mm nuts from the carb base. Stubby wrench is what you need.

4. pull off carb. (I was conscious of debris and stuff at the bottom. be careful.)

5. grab the gasket between the Air Cleaner and carb for the new one.

I was getting greasy at this point, just a pic of 'no carb'.

CardinalFJ60
07-20-2008, 12:04 PM
now...we put everything back together.

1. Carb back on the 4 studs, choke cable, snap on linkage.
2. snug down nuts
3. replace ALL vac lines in the proper place
4. clean up Air cleaner, re-attach (along with hoses)

start up and enjoy.

Uncle Ben
07-20-2008, 04:19 PM
:thumb::thumb::cool: "Yesterday you didn't even know how to spell mecanick....today you is one!" ;) :)

wesintl
07-20-2008, 09:29 PM
What the Heck man! How does she run?

Nice Job!:cheers:

Do I need to give you an oem wing nut for the carb too?

BTW.. what do the shocks have to do with a carb replacement ;)

CardinalFJ60
07-20-2008, 10:21 PM
Wah-hoo! I'm psyched!

With the original carb, I couldn't get over 3200, maybe 3400 rpms no matter what I did. I also had a little 'flat-spot' around 2000-2100 sometime. NOW...She accelerates smoothly and strongly throughout the entire powerband.

I took a small hill I drive all the time where I'd have it floored just to keep speed to about 40 (speed limit is 45). I accelerated fairly quickly to the speed limit. OK...it's no rocket ship, but a VERY noticeable difference compared to the original carb. :D

Wes, Two wing nuts with big washers fused to them on the air cleaner side, and a 10mm nut for the carb side also with a washer fused to it. IIRC, they've been there since new. although, it was new a long time about, that 10mm nut may not be OEM. ;) yup. I owed that engine since new in 86. :thumb: so, you got one of d'em fancy OEM wingnut deal-ios

thanks again for the advice, you guys gave me the confidence to jump in and do it. If I got stuck, I'd just think, WWND? (what would nakman do?) :lmao:

Hulk
07-21-2008, 12:59 AM
Nice! Great news that it runs so much better. That's my favorite kind of mod!

nakman
07-21-2008, 09:42 AM
Good work, Shawn. :thumb: :cheers:

WWND?

just what you did, dive on in there and take advantage of the resources available to you ;)

:risingsun

Rzeppa
07-22-2008, 08:10 PM
Excellent write-up and photos Shawn! Jim does a heck of a job, he's the best in the business that I know of. Glad to see you took our advice about photographing and labeling, there are approximately 432 vacuum hoses that go to an FJ60 carb, and getting them back is a major trick unless you went about it the way you did. From your other thread about when you were thinking about doing it yourself, and then following up on how it's running great after the job, you know the great feeling of having done a significant job on your rig and it's actually better than when you started. Congratulations!