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Rogue Leader
09-15-2008, 05:02 PM
So after applying to several colleges, I am probably going to choose University of Alaska In Fairbanks. One of the reasons is their geology and ice sciences department are pretty good and they have crazy amounts of research. I also wouldn't mind living in Alaska. My conundrum is what to do with my cruiser? I would love to keep it with me but a 3000 mile trip seems pretty daunting in a 35 year old 40. If I were to drive I would probably take at least a month visiting different places. Even the idea of driving to Bozeman for my second choice college scares my mum. So i guess what I'm getting at is, do I spend the next 9 months prepping and convincing my mum to drive up, or should I sell my cruiser here and try to find one when I get to Fairbanks

MDH33
09-15-2008, 05:19 PM
I would get it running perfect and drive it. That would make for some good memories. I'll never forget loading up my 78 FJ40 and heading to the UP of Michigan to go to MI Tech my freshman year. Only 900 miles one way, but a great trip that I did many many times in my 40.

If you don't think it would make it, or if you are a wuss and can't handle that many miles in a 40, then get someone with a tow rig to haul it and all your gear. (just kidding about the wuss part) ;)

Alaska sounds pretty cool. I think I wouldn't get much studying in though with all the exploring to be done, and having a 40 up there would be :cool:

Hulk
09-15-2008, 06:07 PM
Having the 40 in Alaska would be awesome. Taking the road trip to Alaska in the 40 could be awesome -- or not, depending on how reliable it is. What's the furthest distance you have driven it?

I wouldn't hesitate to rely on my 40 to get me to Alaska -- although I would certainly prefer the comfort of the 80 for such a long journey.

What's your gut say?

You might try looking at the Alaska Craigslist and seeing what you can buy up there, rather than hauling your 40 all the way up. Here's a good-looking 40 (http://anchorage.craigslist.org/cto/837465536.html) for $5500.

Rogue Leader
09-15-2008, 06:37 PM
I would love to fix it up and drive it. the only thing that I would have trouble is convincing the female paternal unitto let me go

Uncle Ben
09-15-2008, 07:09 PM
I would love to fix it up and drive it. the only thing that I would have trouble is convincing the female paternal unitto let me go


Just tell ma that this opportunity will support itself and she won't have to give you any money! Be careful though she might tell he friends and you'll end up hauling a buss load of young adults with you! ;) :lmao::lmao:

Seldom Seen
09-15-2008, 08:27 PM
After spending to many "long nights" in Fairbanks, I'll tell ya if you want a 40 in 4 years leave it here!! Alaska winters take their toll in very short order. Student parking on the UAF campus is at a premium and being a Freshman you'll be at the bottom of the pecking order for spaces with a "head bolt heater" (you'll discover what they are real soon) . Without one your rig will sit, unable to start, from Oct to May and you won't be able to dig it out until possibly June.

You won't need a car for at least your 1st year there. The UAF campus is on the South edge of every thing the town has to offer, night life (hockey games mostly) eateries, Safe-way, Freddy Meyers and The Botel (http://www.barflydirectory.com/bar/14721.html) are all with in walking distance even in winter. For longer forays about town, Mt bike in summer and take advantage of the cities network of x-c ski/dog sled trails in winter.

Taxi service is great and $5 will get you from one end of town to the other. For getaways there is regular bus and train service between Fairbanks and Anchorage. The train is cool as you can make arrangements to have them drop you off and pick you up at any spot along the route, even in the middle of nowhere.

With the turn over of Army, Air Force and North Slope workers used cars are easy and cheap to come by. Keep an eye out for bank and credit union repos
also check the secure lots next to the pawn shops on 2nd Street.

Rogue Leader
09-15-2008, 09:08 PM
Seldom,

Thanks for the insight. I haven't been able to go visit the campus so all i know about the campus is from the internet and phone calls to admissions and teachers. I was wondering about the cold and what people did to keep them running in -50.

farnhamstj
09-15-2008, 09:32 PM
I also suggest not having a car/truck in college. I've always wanted to drive to AK. But, I sugest you go w/o a rig for at least your freshman year. Scope it out and if you choose, drive it there next summer. Mom will respect you more if you concentrate on school and you'll be a year wiser when you try to persuade Mom, "I know what I'm doing, I'm driving this rusty old truck all the way to Alaska and you can't stop me." Besides, save your pennies for heli skiing in May. It's $700 a day but worth it.

Seldom Seen
09-15-2008, 09:57 PM
I was wondering about the cold and what people did to keep them running in -50.

You start it when it drops below 40 and leave it running till it warms back up NO J/K :eek:

Head bolt heaters aren't effective much below 40 so if it looked like the bottom was going to drop out we would fire up the truck and leave it running. When it got to 50 below the truck stop on the Steese Hwy would serve free coffee. so we'd head down and sit around and shoot the bull with the other sardoughs. It was a great way to ward off cabin fever.

*edit* forgot to mention, hitchhiking is a time honored tradition in Alaska. Completely safe. It's considered a violation of social mores if you don't offer a ride to a hiker. I don't know the legalities but I have accepted ride from a State Trooper w/o repercussions.

leiniesred
09-16-2008, 08:34 AM
Wow, Alaska!
I say leave the 40 here.
My Friend Verne bought a BJ70 up there while he lives/works in Alaska.

I think your best bet is a heavily undercoated minitruck 4x4 pickup with a topper. Able to haul more crap. Possibly more reliable/eaiser to get parts for. Probably easier to start in the cold. Save the 40 for sunny visits at the homestead.

nuclearlemon
09-16-2008, 09:33 AM
my advice in a nutshell....
go to alaska
don't take the 40
buy a cheap beater up there, but only if you need to
if you do buy a beater, skip the headbolt heater and get a good block heater (if you can find a recirculating one for cheap, that would be best).

nakman
09-16-2008, 09:52 AM
+1 for leave the 40 here, and don't have a car your first year in college (Alaska or anywhere). Good reasons are all stated above, hth..

Seldom Seen
09-16-2008, 09:10 PM
I think your best bet is a heavily undercoated minitruck 4x4 pickup with a topper. Able to haul more crap. Possibly more reliable/eaiser to get parts for. Probably easier to start in the cold. Save the 40 for sunny visits at the homestead.

Almost made that mistake. Glad I listen to my cousin, who had already lived there a few years. Mini's, Taco's and 'Runners aren't real popular in Fairbanks. CV boots, at 40 below, freeze solid as a rock and when you drive away they shatter like the flower you dipped in liquid nitrogen in science class. A friend of my spent over $1000 on CV replacement on his 1st gen during one particularly cold winter. Yea, I've hear it all before, "I'm a manly man and I can change them my self" I've also taken care of the manly men, in the hospital, with severe frostbite on their hands from attempting to change them their-selves. Lock-out's help but the boots still shatter when the suspension cycles.

Fairbanks has an entire cottage industry devoted to replacing CV's.

My cousin suggested, like others here, get thought your 1st winter and learn what works then take that info and figure what will work best for you.

I ended up with a Bronco II and it worked out well. Twin Traction Beam has no CVs to worry about. Broncos (big and baby) Rangers, Explorers and F150 were the norm. Full sized Jeeps and Cherokee's were next. 60's seemed to out number all other Toyota on the road. There were a few 80's and the Tercel AWD wagon had a loyal following. Subaru's were the choice for cars and seemed to have the lowest CV boot failure rate of any thing on the road.

Rogue Leader
09-16-2008, 09:43 PM
Interesting about the CV joints. So the consensus seems to leave it here for several years and if I need a car find one cheap up there. Looks like my brother wont have to buy a car.

Seldom Seen
09-16-2008, 10:38 PM
Oh, 1 more reason to leave the car behind. If I had been driving my truck instead of hiking I would never have seen her. That ain't no stray dog