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View Full Version : too many "professionals"


nuclearlemon
10-08-2008, 12:03 PM
and it's driving me crazy. i don't know how many "professional" mechanics i deal with all day long that have no clue what the part they need is called or does, but they know they need it. people don't test things anymore...they just buy a part to fix what it might be, then return it when that's not the problem. our own shop did this on an abs ecu and now on a flasher! how f'n hard is it to test the light circuit before saying they need a flasher, only to return the flasher five minutes later saying that's not the problem.

i just got a phone call from a "tech" in wyoming that says he's having problems with his fan clutch. he replaced the solenoid, but it's still not working, so he called me to ask what could be wrong. hth would i know! you're the mechanic! MORONS

what happened to the true professional mechanics? is the only training guys get now "how to be a parts changer101?":rant::rant:

just had to rant...

RockRunner
10-08-2008, 12:26 PM
They must have come from the IT world. Most items now are FRU's, Field Replaceable Unit. We go to the customer with a $10K motherboard and replace it, no testing what may be wrong on the board, just replace it.

It is faster and easier to do it that way then to test things. We return the old board to Sun and they fix it themselves and send it out again as a FRU.

nuclearlemon
10-08-2008, 12:32 PM
little different when it's just one thing though. fan clutch could be clutch, could be hub, could be solenoid, could be temp switch, could be airline....you get the picture.

i personally wouldn't want them replacing an $80 solenoid and $600 clutch when it was a $27 temp sender.

RockRunner
10-08-2008, 12:37 PM
I understand that but it seems like it is going that way. Parts are cheaper sometimes than the mechanics time.

SteveH
10-09-2008, 12:20 PM
Ige - my TV repairman buddy's term for those folks is 'pluck and chuck' technicians. See if you can weave that into a conversation with one of them.

Steve

Rzeppa
10-12-2008, 11:16 PM
Ige - my TV repairman buddy's term for those folks is 'pluck and chuck' technicians. See if you can weave that into a conversation with one of them.

Steve

Now there's an old timer term: "TV Repairman". LOL! Here's another memory to show how old some of are: Back in the day, they used to have tube tester machines in the drug store. When your TV was on the fritz, you'd unplug the tubes, wrap them up and take them in. Plug them in to the various sockets on the machine, read the dials, figure out which one was bad, buy a new one, go back home and your TV was fixed. Even my mom knew how to do that.

Uncle Ben
10-12-2008, 11:25 PM
Now there's an old timer term: "TV Repairman". LOL! Here's another memory to show how old some of are: Back in the day, they used to have tube tester machines in the drug store. When your TV was on the fritz, you'd unplug the tubes, wrap them up and take them in. Plug them in to the various sockets on the machine, read the dials, figure out which one was bad, buy a new one, go back home and your TV was fixed. Even my mom knew how to do that.

That was the day of re-use not re-place. The country decided it was crazy to have all this untouched land so we decided to produce disposable everything so we could create mountains on which future generations will build houses! :rolleyes:

Hulk
10-13-2008, 01:26 AM
Back when I was a boy, my job was to lug the empty Coke and Pepsi bottles from our car to the front of the grocery store. It got a lot worse when the soda makers started selling "King Size" bottles, which were 16 oz. rather than 10 oz. Much heavier, and the cardboard carriers cut into my fingers. Those old bottles were sterilized and refilled, time after time -- only the bottle caps went into a land fill.

Beer bottles used to be the same way. All "long necks" were refilled. You mostly couldn't get long necks anywhere other than at a bar. If you went to a good liquor store, however, you could buy a case of long necks in a re-usable heavy-duty wax cardboard box. Only the label and the cap had to be replaced (the soda bottles were painted, so only the bottle cap had to replaced on those).

In the 80s, several beer makers got the bright idea that people would pay more for beer in long neck bottles, so they started making disposable long necks -- they looked the same, but the glass was thinner. The first time I brewed my own beer, I went to some liquor stores in search of the old refillable bottles, since they were thicker and supposedly safer to use for home brewing. They were hard to find (this was maybe 1995) -- there were only a few small Wisconsin breweries that were still using the old "bar quality" bottles. They are probably impossible to find now.

Seems like such a waste. We recycle all our glass at my house, but it still has to go through the whole process before it becomes another bottle.

One more thought:
Can you imagine going back in time 40 years ago and telling folks that you were going to start selling water in bottles? "No, not mineral water. Just good tap water, in plastic bottles. Gonna sell it for $2.00 a bottle." You woulda been laughed outta the county. :rolleyes: