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farnhamstj
01-22-2009, 07:40 PM
I looked a little but the 8800 is a little more than what i can spend at the moment. Nor do I know what features I need? Can someone steer me toward the budget minded set up? Or recomend a site that will take my money and ship me what I need. What am I looking for? What should I stay away from. I guess I'm hopeing to swap to a single DIN stereo and install a HAM in what would have been the remaining hole? What's it really going to cost for a HAM setup? Anyone in the club ready to upgrade? My dash is almost identical to an 80.:o

MDH33
01-22-2009, 07:56 PM
Here's what Wes said in another post:


What's a basic HAM setup cost and will anyone want to sell me one cheap basic set up in vechile can be had for ~$150 (yaesu 1802 and antenna, dual bands will run you more but that is a nice basic set up to run 2m.



I'm going to go with the yaesu 1802. Cheap, tough and effective for trail runs in my 40 which is really the only time/place I'll be using it.

:beer:

nakman
01-22-2009, 10:51 PM
x2 on that, the 1802 or 2800 are both solid, then a decent antenna and a clean power setup. As a club we're pretty bias towards the Yaesu rigs, benefit of which is someone on a run will tell you what button to push if you mess something up by mistake (and we've all btdt).


FWIW, Ige is my current ham hero in the club, she's got one of the most budget rigs of anyone yet has hands down the best performance of any one of our's truck in 2 meters (that's mobile antenna, mind you, the :yagi: on the camper stuff doesn't count). Pretty sure she's running the 2800, and has a good antenna with good ground plane, the swr must be right as well. But it's simple, it works, and I have consistently heard her signal clearer and over greater distances than anyone else in the club.. :bowdown: that's the setup I'd copy.

Where are we at on the mic holder anyway?

farnhamstj
01-22-2009, 11:56 PM
I'll snap some photos of it tomorow and get them to you. Thanks.

wesintl
01-23-2009, 12:28 AM
the 2800 can put out 65w vs 50 with the 1802,so it's a little more powerful. I think our range was pretty similar when we were talking to Bruce while he was in camp on the GTR. We were on the other side of hill on waunita pass.

RicardoJM
01-23-2009, 08:45 AM
I have the 2800 in the FJ40 and Bronco. The antenna in the FJ40 is from the antenna building party and works just fine. The radio was $112 new and the antenna building materials were maybe $10, certainly no more than $15.

My experience with the 2800 has been very good. It bounces around in the 40, gets dusty and has enough volume to be heard over the 40 noise. I picked it over the 1802 because of the additional 15 watts.

I have not put a radio in the LX470 yet. I'd like to go with a detachable unit (7800 or 8800) primarily because the truck is still mall rated.

Jacket
01-23-2009, 09:00 AM
I went through this process recently. I would have been perfectly happy with the (Yaesu) 2800, but ultimately I was sold on the 7800 because of the ability to remote mount the radio, and just have a faceplate and mic up front. I hate cluttering up the front dash and console, so having just a small faceplate (which I mounted in the overhead console) makes it nice and clean.

nuclearlemon
01-23-2009, 09:31 AM
i'm running a 2800 that i picked up at hro for $109 and what's considered a less desireable mount right now, the hood clip on nmo mount (but it appears to work well with my radio;) ). the antenna and base were picked up online, but i can't tell you where. i tried looking for their catalog that they sent, but can't find it and the website is saved on the harddrive from my crashed computer. after root gets over here to transfer my harddrive info, i'll check on that for ya.

Groucho
01-23-2009, 09:44 AM
I looked a little but the 8800 is a little more than what i can spend at the moment. Nor do I know what features I need? Can someone steer me toward the budget minded set up? Or recomend a site that will take my money and ship me what I need. What am I looking for? What should I stay away from. I guess I'm hopeing to swap to a single DIN stereo and install a HAM in what would have been the remaining hole? What's it really going to cost for a HAM setup? Anyone in the club ready to upgrade? My dash is almost identical to an 80.:o

I am going to start working on making a replacement sheet metal part for the factory radio mounting sheet metal that will also have tabs included to mount the FT-2800 in the opening below a single din radio. I know that everyone throws up the red flag that there might be too much heat for this setup, but there is a factory fan above the radios (at least in the 80's) that in my case still functions. Plus, not one of us will run the radio long enough to worry. It may not look pretty at first, but plans are to make it mall-rated pretty before getting them to others. If you get the FT-2800 and it will work for your 100, this might be an option.

I have the 2800 in the FJ40 and Bronco. The antenna in the FJ40 is from the antenna building party and works just fine. The radio was $112 new and the antenna building materials were maybe $10, certainly no more than $15.

My experience with the 2800 has been very good. It bounces around in the 40, gets dusty and has enough volume to be heard over the 40 noise. I picked it over the 1802 because of the additional 15 watts.



I also have leftover assemblies for the homebrew 2M antenna. You have to put it together yourself (but that's part of the fun) and it works great. I also have a stainless steel mount that attaches on the inside of the engine compartment and sticks out the hood. I'll post a picture if you want.

DaveInDenver
01-23-2009, 09:48 AM
Just a question, do you guys remember about the 50W vs 65W thing? The difference in real range? This is a legitimate tech question that will come up.

Range increases as the square root of the power increase. Doubling your power increases effective range by SQRT of 2, or 1.414 times the range. So the jump from 5W to 50W is SQRT of 10, roughly 3.2 times the range. The increase from 50 to 65 watts is 1.3 times the power, so SQRT of 1.3 is 1.14 times the range. The difference is negligible and far outweighed by the antenna selection and tuning than anything.

The point is that it's not linear and mostly a sales number and don't put much weight on it as a selection criteria. In the ~50W class of mobile, get the radio that primarily fits in your truck, price, etc. and don't worry about the transmitter power too much. At least keep as a secondary part of the choice.

nakman
01-23-2009, 09:59 AM
That's a great point Dave, also note that most of us run on 1 watt almost exclusively, particularly on trail runs. It's only when you really want to try to hit someone that you bump up the power... I've become a QRP junkie though, I always aim for the lowest power setting that still gets the job done.

And to qualify something from above, I have had QSO's with Ige from my driveway that's above Indian Hills, when she's on Yankee Hill on 5 watts. I have also monitored/spoken with her when I'm in Empire and she's running Kingston Peak.. both times there were 3-4 other trucks in her group and I couldn't hear any of them, or maybe one other occasionally, but none as consistently or as clearly as Ms. nuclearlemon ;)

That side of the hood lip mount didn't work the best for me, but you have somewhow got it right so don't change a thing, Ige. :)

wesintl
01-23-2009, 10:14 AM
life it too short for qrp. I'll run 5w on the trail next to folks but otherwise turn up the power :D

I'd still like to make an antenna Nathaniel

Groucho
01-23-2009, 10:18 AM
No problem, Wes.
I have parts that I can get to you.

Here is a picture of the part for the hood mount antenna bracket. Nothing major, probably can get something like it at the CB shop, but this one fits at the mounting location well.

MDH33
01-23-2009, 10:26 AM
Any suggestions on which antennae I should get for my 40 if I go with the 1802? I will likely mount it somewhere up front but not sure where.

wesintl
01-23-2009, 11:05 AM
Build one of Nathaniels or larsen NMO 150-B

RicardoJM
01-23-2009, 12:22 PM
Any suggestions on which antennae I should get for my 40 if I go with the 1802? I will likely mount it somewhere up front but not sure where.

I concurr with Wes. Mounting mine was as easy as drilling a hole in the bumper. While it is not in the ideal location to maximize ground plane, it works great. I've only had it out on the Spooky Night Run, but we got pretty spread out and being near the back I had no issues communicating with Nakman (and everyone in between) up at the front.

Here is the post (http://www.risingsun4x4club.org/forum2/showthread.php?t=7208&highlight=fj40+2800+antenna) on the installation of radio and antenna in my 40. There is also a link in there to the antenna building party, which has step by step description of the process, but for some reason is missing the pictures. Perhaps, Corsair23 can review the image links.

MDH33
01-23-2009, 01:30 PM
Great info guys, thanks.

More questions:

When connecting power to a radio, does it have to go directly to the battery? If so, why? Can it connect/splice into the fuse panel? If it goes directly to the battery, would you need to put in some sort of inline fuse?

When mounting the ham radio antenna, how close to the CB antenna can it be?

Uncle Ben
01-23-2009, 02:03 PM
Great info guys, thanks.

More questions:

When connecting power to a radio, does it have to go directly to the battery? If so, why? Can it connect/splice into the fuse panel? If it goes directly to the battery, would you need to put in some sort of inline fuse?

When mounting the ham radio antenna, how close to the CB antenna can it be?

The cleaner the path from battery to radio the cleaner the operation!

RicardoJM
01-23-2009, 02:05 PM
When connecting power to a radio, does it have to go directly to the battery? If so, why? Can it connect/splice into the fuse panel? If it goes directly to the battery, would you need to put in some sort of inline fuse?

I ran the power direct to the battery. The radio comes with plenty enough wire to get to the battery. I did sheath the wires in a plastic tube and used zip ties to route it so it is clean looking and doesnt fall into anything in the engine compartment.

I suppose you could tap into the fuse panel. I would recommend against this because of the risk of introducing "alternator whine" and possibly overriding the circuit that you tap into. If you go this route ideally you would want to have a dedicated slot on the fuse panel. IIRC, Rezarf even labled the slots for accessories when he installed his second fuse panel. In the future this is something that I would like to do as well.

The wiring that came with the radio has fuses inline and is almost ready to go out of the box. The only "wiring work" I had to do was crimping on connectors to attach the wires to the battery posts. I used the type of connectors that have waterproof shrink wrap built in. Once I decided where I wanted to put the radio, the rest of the install did not take long.

I only have the ham so I'm not in a position to answer the question on how far away the CB antenna needs to be.

wesintl
01-23-2009, 02:30 PM
My 2 antennas are both the the tabs on the bull bar so like 3ft. It was fine on the GTR but for the most part i'll be loosing the cb forever.

Groucho
01-23-2009, 02:33 PM
I ran the power direct to the battery.
I suppose you could tap into the fuse panel.

One of the questions for the general exam is "Where should the radio be wired from, the battery or the vehicles fuse panel?"

The correct answer is: Directly to the battery.

While the very casual user may see no problems arise from hooking their radio to the cigarette lighter/aux power outlet, in general the accepted safe practice is to wire the radio directly to the battery (or secondary fuse block, as long as said fuse block is wired for the correct current draw of all the appliances connected to it). Keep in mind that some of these radios use upwards of 30A draw when in transmit mode. Even the ARB 32Q freezer/fridge (which may connect to the cig lighter) draws 7A constant load!

Don't try and make sense of "My CB radio was alright hooking to the vehicles fuse block, so my HAM radio will be as well." The maximum legal output of a commercially sold CB radio is 5 watts. Most of our 2M radios are between 50 and 75 watts, and the all mode (HF, VHF, UHF) radios can come ready to give 100 watts power. Maybe Dave can give us the equation for current draw at 12V and 50W power. I guarantee that the vehicles fuse block does not have any spare openings rated to the numbers you will find.

The reason this is bad for us is because too many garage mechanics half-a$* our wiring, leading to a spaghetti mess under our seats and our hood. Not only does this promote problems, it also can lead to unsafe things happening like engine fires and short circuits. I had a negative battery cable fall off of a VW and it treated the battery as a fuseable link and fried it. The battery was GONE. Melted the insides like cheese in the microwave. The idea is that if general practice is to wire everything to the battery, less problems caused by wiring messes and less chance of unsafe things happening. Ultimately, it will encourage us to be btter at our "spaghetti mess" and become more professional with our installations.

Bruce Miller
01-23-2009, 02:55 PM
life is too short for qrp. ...turn up the power :D

Good for you!:thumb:

DaveInDenver
01-23-2009, 03:46 PM
Maybe Dave can give us the equation for current draw at 12V and 50W power.
This is a tech test question...

BTW, another reason to wire straight to the battery with both leads is noise immunity. If both positive and negative cables are run together and to the same power source, any EMI noise will create the same level of interference on both wires and that can be filtered easier. That's called common mode noise because it's common to both leads.

chtucker
01-23-2009, 09:30 PM
This is a tech test question...

BTW, another reason to wire straight to the battery with both leads is noise immunity. If both positive and negative cables are run together and to the same power source, any EMI noise will create the same level of interference on both wires and that can be filtered easier. That's called common mode noise because it's common to both leads.


This is a debatable decision... Theoretically it reduces noise. Some HAM manufacturers intend for you to do this, and include fuses on the negative lead.

I think with "modern (made in the last 5 years)" radios it is not needed. If your charging system is up to the task and your engine grounds are good.

There is a theory that without fusing the negative you provide a method for short to travel through the radio.

The "experts" at Motorola do not want you to take the negative lead to the battery.... and that is what I go by... I have well into the multiple hundreds of radio installs done in everything from Harleys, Crown Vics, up to Oshkosh plow trucks... and I do them all the same. Even from the factory prewires from International Truck, the negative is just to chassis.

The quality of an newer Yaesu, Icom, Kenwood matches there commercial stuff, heck they are the same radio.

The Motorola, Tait, MA/COM, BK stuff is in a different league (and price range)

I am not supplied with the proper stuff to do installs. On the radios that are not provided with ignition sense capabilities, I really should be running radios off a relay that uses a key on ignition sense.... But as a HAM you probably are not worried about ignition sense...

I have tapped the "hot" side of mini atm fuses for a lot of radios... Typically they are 35-50 watt VHF radios... I use these

http://www.bussmann.com/images/3c2dce34-cf0b-43a1-aabf-d886ccd13aad.JPG


I know it ain't right.... but they aren't my vehicles... But nothing has caught fire yet:hill:

Here is some of my work:

http://chtucker.home.bresnan.net/motocop1.jpeg

Hulk
01-24-2009, 12:35 AM
There's another reason to bypass any key switched connections -- so you can talk on your radio or monitor the local chatter while your rig is off and you're having lunch.

I installed an aux. fuse block that goes direct to the battery, and hooked my 7800 to that. You're going to be installing more stuff in the future: being in a club with Nakman virtually guarantees that. Might as well be prepared.

farnhamstj
01-29-2009, 05:54 PM
I've been researching and the yaesu 7800 looks like the way to go. I like the idea of the faceplate being mountable separatly. dual band I don't quite understand yet? but I bet I will shortly after my HAM book arrives and I attend some classes next month. Reviews seem to be better than for the 2800 and 1802. there seem to be complaints about the mic on both models and I assume the mic is different for the 7800. Looks like they can be found for $230. Anything to watch out for or venders to avoid? Now I got to learn about antennas. I don't need anything as big as Nathaniel's.

nakman
01-29-2009, 06:16 PM
... dual band I don't quite understand yet? ...

Dual band means you can listen to two channels at once. A dual band like the 8800 is almost like having two separate radios, hard wired together. So you've got the Vail repeater (Colorado Connection) on one, then the 146.460 simplex group you're running with on the other. You're in contact with the group on the trail, also listening for your friend who's running late. That's just one of the many ways to use dual band.. another is using your truck as a base station to cross band repeat, so you can be walking or sitting around with an HT yet communicate through the better rig in the truck. Or in Moab you'll have your trail run on one channel, and can monitor another trail on the other, or even scan all of them on the other channel.

When I drive around in Denver, I'll usually have 145.145 on one channel and 146.460 on the other, those being our most popular I'm bound to catch whomever else is out there. Or pop over to the weather channel on the second band for a minute or two during a run, just for grins.. lots of ways to use a dual band radio, no you don't need it but it sure is cool and I'm very glad I got one, and don't know anyone here who also has one who regrets the purchase.

Convert
01-29-2009, 07:21 PM
I've been researching and the yaesu 7800 looks like the way to go. I like the idea of the faceplate being mountable separatly. dual band I don't quite understand yet?
The 7800 is not a true dual band like the 8800. The 7800 is dual band in the sense that it can receive/transmit on two bands ( 2 meter and 70 centimeter).The 8800 is a true dual band you can listen to two different frequencies at the same time ( two radios in one right side left side) same bands as the 7800. Hope that makes sense? If you decide on the 7800 give me a shout I may have one for sale. It would include the remote mounting kit and software ( cable required)

Uncle Ben
01-29-2009, 07:26 PM
The 7800 is not a true dual band like the 8800. The 7800 is dual band in the sense that it can receive/transmit on two bands ( 2 meter and 70 centimeter).The 8800 is a true dual band you can listen to two different frequencies at the same time ( two radios in one right side left side) same bands as the 7800. Hope that makes sense? If you decide on the 7800 give me a shout I may have one for sale. It would include the remote mounting kit and software ( cable required)

2nds on the "7800 maybe." 40's gonna need some ears!

farnhamstj
01-29-2009, 07:42 PM
convert you have a pm

farnhamstj
01-29-2009, 08:01 PM
"The FT-7800R provides 50 Watts of power on the 144 Mhz band, and 40 Watts on the 430 MHz, and is designed for simplicity of operation along with high performance in the receiver section. The FT-7800R is ideal for the active Ham who has a need for simplex, repeater, or FM satellite operation on both bands, but without the complication of cross-band repeat capability, which is available on our FT-8800R and FT-8900R models."

A train leaves Chicago at 6am traveling 75mph toward Denver. Another train leaves Denver at 6:30 am traveling toward Chicago at 60mph. If the distance from Denver to Chicago is 1100miles. The trains are powered by electricity generated by an onboard flux capacitor similar to the one in Back to Future, but not identical. Each passanger paid 250 euros for the ticket. How many people are on each train and how many gigawatts will it take to get to 1984?

Convert
01-29-2009, 08:28 PM
"The FT-7800R provides 50 Watts of power on the 144 Mhz band, and 40 Watts on the 430 MHz, and is designed for simplicity of operation along with high performance in the receiver section. The FT-7800R is ideal for the active Ham who has a need for simplex, repeater, or FM satellite operation on both bands, but without the complication of cross-band repeat capability, which is available on our FT-8800R and FT-8900R models."

A train leaves Chicago at 6am traveling 75mph toward Denver. Another train leaves Denver at 6:30 am traveling toward Chicago at 60mph. If the distance from Denver to Chicago is 1100miles. The trains are powered by electricity generated by an onboard flux capacitor similar to the one in Back to Future, but not identical. Each passanger paid 250 euros for the ticket. How many people are on each train and how many gigawatts will it take to get to 1984?

Welcome to HAM SPEAK

nakman
01-29-2009, 08:29 PM
Dude, don't over think it, just get the 8800 you won't regret it. You can always sell it to someone if you decide it wasn't the right move, and recover most of your investment.

Dan, if you sell the 7800 what are you going to get?

Convert
01-29-2009, 08:35 PM
Dude, don't over think it, just get the 8800 you won't regret it. You can always sell it to someone if you decide it wasn't the right move, and recover most of your investment.

Dan, if you sell the 7800 what are you going to get?

Listening to the 8800 on the 145 right now
:thumb:

Groucho
01-29-2009, 09:24 PM
A train leaves Chicago at 6am traveling 75mph toward Denver. Another train leaves Denver at 6:30 am traveling toward Chicago at 60mph. If the distance from Denver to Chicago is 1100miles. The trains are powered by electricity generated by an onboard flux capacitor similar to the one in Back to Future, but not identical. Each passanger paid 250 euros for the ticket. How many people are on each train and how many gigawatts will it take to get to 1984?

1.21 Gigawatts, of course! I can't believe I beat Dave to the answer on this one!! :woot:

Dude, don't over think it, just get the 8800 you won't regret it. You can always sell it to someone if you decide it wasn't the right move, and recover most of your investment.

What he said.

As per the pending doom of the 3rd annual HAM class will show, the 8800 has 2 VFO's, or Variable Frequency Oscillators. A variable frequency oscillator (VFO) in electronics is a oscillator with an oscillation frequency that can be electronically changed (hence, variable). It is a necessary component in any radio receiver or transmitter that works by the superheterodyne principle, and controls the frequency to which the apparatus is tuned.

Which in laymans terms? The VFO is the "gypsies" behind the tuning dial that change the frequency just like your AM/FM radio.

The 2800 and 1802 have only one and it is limited to the 2M band.

The 7800 has only one, but it can do both 2M and 70CM bands individually.

The 8800 has two. Each one can do both the 2M and 70CM bands.

The real gain of the 8800? You can monitor two frequencies at the same time, as well as some cross-band repeating using VHF to UHF or UHF to VHF in order to gain range. We'll go into that during class.

HF--High frequency which is any frequency between 1.8MHz and 29.7MHz
VHF--Very High Frequency which is defined as any frequency between 50MHz and 225Mhz (for HAM use)
UHF--Ultra High Frequecy which is defined as any frequency between 420MHz and 1300Mhz

I'm done now...

Uncle Ben
01-29-2009, 10:15 PM
1.21 Gigawatts, of course! I can't believe I beat Dave to the answer on this one!! :woot:




Aaaaaaaa don't you mean 1.21 Gw x2?

....and assuming each tube in a case of Plutonium is 1 gram = 290 passengers on both trains combined or 145 passengers on each maybe?

Groucho
01-29-2009, 10:34 PM
1.21 gigawatts! (http://www.gotwavs.com/php/sounds/?id=gog&media=MP3S&type=Movies&movie=Back_To_The_Future&quote=121gigawatts.txt&file=121gigawatts.mp3)

Uncle Ben
01-29-2009, 10:35 PM
1.21 gigawatts! (http://www.gotwavs.com/php/sounds/?id=gog&media=MP3S&type=Movies&movie=Back_To_The_Future&quote=121gigawatts.txt&file=121gigawatts.mp3)

X 2 trains

Groucho
01-30-2009, 08:03 AM
:kevin:

The two trains are not traveling to 1984, just the people on the trains. The only person on train B is Mario Vlaspardi. His mother was a well know bass singer. His father was the first person to combine spaghetti with bicarbonate of soda, thus causing and curing indigestion at the same time. The only person on train A tells me that the clause in the contract that I'm reading is the "Sanity Clause", so I tell him that you can't fool me, there ain't no Sanity Claus.

:lmao::lmao: Te amo! :kevin:

DaveInDenver
01-30-2009, 09:02 AM
This is a debatable decision... Theoretically it reduces noise. Some HAM manufacturers intend for you to do this, and include fuses on the negative lead.
It's not a theory, matched length cables induce a more typically common mode noise than two unequal lengths of wire and CM noise is easier to filter. The reason after market manufacturers require it is that they can't know that everyone will pick wire routes that are parasitic-free and so equal length cables to the battery are more likely to result in lower noise installs for more people. If there's one thing they hate is 1,000 people complaining on the Internet about alternator noise on their 2m radios. So it's certainly not necessary if you are careful and know not to run parallel to EMI-inducing wires and do solid work.

DaveInDenver
01-30-2009, 09:04 AM
X 2 trains
Plus you assume that a train takes the same energy as a 1982 DMC-12, which I would guess isn't the case. That 1.21GW is shown to transport one person + one dog and 2,700 lbs of stainless steel and rubber. It could easily take a lot more to get a whole train back to 1984.

Uncle Ben
01-30-2009, 12:16 PM
Plus you assume that a train takes the same energy as a 1982 DMC-12, which I would guess isn't the case. That 1.21GW is shown to transport one person + one dog and 2,700 lbs of stainless steel and rubber. It could easily take a lot more to get a whole train back to 1984.

Soooooo how much does a train capable of hauling 150 passengers weigh? :rolleyes: :geek: ;)

DaveInDenver
01-30-2009, 01:28 PM
Soooooo how much does a train capable of hauling 150 passengers weigh? :rolleyes: :geek: ;)
http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20061007151346AAWdaRL

If you can believe the Internets, a freight train weighs around 10,000 tons. So if we know Doc Brown could take about 3,000 lbs back to the future with 1.21GW, then we are sure that 8.1 terrawatts would do it.

So how about some actual geeky stuff? If you combine all the power plants in the USA we have about 5,000 GW of generating capacity. That's just 5 TW, so we might not be able to send a train through time without adding a whole lot more power plants to the grid or figuring out a more efficient flux capacitor!

How about some more geekiness? An atomic explosion, like the a-bomb over Hiroshima which had about 1kg of U235 actually work (the thinking is it had about 35 kg inside and most of it didn't react), releases about 50x10^13 joules (50 TJ), so that's about 50 TW if it lasted 1 second. Or how about this, it takes about 10^13 joules (10 TJ) to put the Space Shuttle into orbit, which takes about 3 minutes. So that's about 55.6 GW for that 3 minutes. And, if that does not impress you, consider that for the 3 minutes of Shuttle launch the amount of energy our whole country uses goes up 1%. Or put another way, the energy used by the Shuttle to get into space could power around 1,000 average households for one year.

BTW, on a serious note about the Shuttle and stuff. This point of the year it's important to pause and remember the NASA astronauts who have died.
1/27/67 - Apollo 1
1/28/86 - Challenger
2/1/03 - Columbia

Corbet
02-11-2009, 09:51 PM
I installed a Kenwood TM-V71A last year and have no complaints. I mainly picked it because the buttons all have backlights, so I can see them at night. Display can be switched to green. Otherwise its similar to the 8800 in features. I'm still a nob with it. Someday someone with more knowledge will show me how to really use it.

Link to radio:

http://www.kenwoodusa.com/Communications/Amateur_Radio/Mobiles/TM-V71A

Install here: starting at post #28

http://www.risingsun4x4club.org/forum2/showthread.php?t=6219&highlight=kenwood&page=3

I did not wire directly to the battery but to an accessory fuse block.

nuclearlemon
02-17-2009, 04:53 PM
the antenna and base were picked up online, but i can't tell you where. i tried looking for their catalog that they sent, but can't find it and the website is saved on the harddrive from my crashed computer.

the company i got my mounts and antenna from are called the lakeview company. think this might be my antenna
http://www.hamstick.com/dbw.htm

DaveInDenver
02-17-2009, 06:27 PM
the company i got my mounts and antenna from are called the lakeview company. think this might be my antenna
http://www.hamstick.com/dbw.htm
This is the antenna the Red_Chili is running, too.

farnhamstj
02-17-2009, 09:27 PM
Went by HRO on the way to Mondays class. Parted way with some cash.

Yeasu FT-1802M $129 2m, small,
Diamond Antenna K400SNMO $79 clamp on trunk 13.5ft cable
Diamond Antenna NR-770HBNMO $65 1/2 wavelength 3.0 gain on 2m, 3ft long

I decided I wanted a small radio. 1802 is like 1/2 the size of 2800. And if I wasn't reaching where I wanted to at 50w, I didn't think Id make it at 65w. I considered the 7800 due to the removable face, But I decided I was going to mount the radio in the same place that I would have mounted the face. Also, I *think* an 8800 is really a better choice in the long run but.. I decided on the trunk lip mount, it included the cable and pivots to any angle, no drilling involved. The antenna is both 2m and 70cm (gives me more frequencies in the long run if I upgrade radios) Most Importantly it FOLDS. Almost as important, it has a cool swirly thing in the middle that ups the PIMP factor. I think I copied Romers antenna set up. A 2m non folding antenna was $35 and regular drill hood mount NMO about $35. So I spent a little extra. I saw the homemade antenna the RS club have been building. Cool and functional and defiantly the way to go if you are after the best value. But wife wouldn't want to look at it every time she drives.

The radio mounting I think I've got figured out.
On it's way from Crutchfield is a pioneer single din radio that will drive a behind the dash XM satellite radio. And a pocket below that fills the empty space. The plan is to mount the 1802 inside the pocket which I will cut out the bottom and back to allow some venting. I figure I'm mostly transmitting on 5w anyway.
The goal was to add the HAM and decrease the number of wires that I have to look at while driving.

nuclearlemon
02-17-2009, 09:31 PM
a behind the dash XM satellite radio..

sure you want to be looking into those with the impending bankruptcy;)

wesintl
02-17-2009, 10:21 PM
congrats Farnham. You'll like that radio.

Life is too short for qrp though.

Uncle Ben
02-18-2009, 11:29 AM
Anybody familier with the Icom V8000? (http://www.icomamerica.com/en/products/v8000/) I'm thinking it would be a great 2m rig for Wildrice...

Bruce Miller
02-20-2009, 06:28 PM
I have an IC-V8000 in one of my cruisers. At 75 watts, it's advertised to be the most powerful 2 meter rig in its class. Due to the high power, the rig must be installed in an area where the ventilation is good because of the heat it generates on transmit. Also, the high power will, over time, destroy a 2 meter mobile antenna. I tend to keep my transmissions on the short side. You can read more about IC-V8000 concerns by visiting the K0BG web site.

On a positive note, during my commute this past Sunday, I was able to make radio contact with Barbara in New Mexico, using the Sierra Grande, NM repeater, all the way up to Pueblo on I-25 before the signals began breaking up to the point where communications became very difficult. That's a distance, as the crow flies, of about 125 miles on 2 meters! By the way, Barbara was on an HT, 5 watts, using a vertical antenna about 10 feet high.

MDH33
03-03-2009, 10:31 AM
Anybody familier with the Icom V8000? (http://www.icomamerica.com/en/products/v8000/) I'm thinking it would be a great 2m rig for Wildrice...

This one's on sale at HRO right now. $20 rebate plus $10 off coupon from HRO. Should be able to get it well under the $200 mark. :thumb:

rover67
03-04-2009, 06:12 PM
I just scored a V8000 for free from a coworker. still in the original box. Only thing he did was program it I guess! Man I am stoked!!

Karst8835
03-15-2009, 10:03 AM
I just bought a FT-8800R and a Diamond NR-77OHB antenna for my FZJ80 from HRO. Where is the best place to mount the antenna? I don't mind drilling a hole in the roof.

DaveInDenver
03-15-2009, 10:49 AM
I just bought a FT-8800R and a Diamond NR-77OHB antenna for my FZJ80 from HRO.
Nice combo, I like my 8800 well enough. If only Yaesu would put the guts of the 8800 into a package more similar to the 7800 in layout I think it would be hard to beat. The 8800 is an operate-by-braille radio, 'specially at night.
Where is the best place to mount the antenna? I don't mind drilling a hole in the roof.
Yup. The main downside to the roof is that it makes the truck very tall and you have to watch drive-thrus and garages if the antenna does not flex well. But it really is the best place performance wise. But door edges and rain gutters are OK, height is key.

Karst8835
03-17-2009, 08:51 PM
Thanks, The antenna does has a joint at the bottom that enables it to be folded down.

Jack