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rover67
02-16-2009, 09:23 AM
Ok... so yesterday marked the second time in a year I have had a portable hard drive fail... which is SUPER frustrating since I keep ALL of my stuff on it.

Anyways, I was thinking the best solution would be to get a dual drive setup where each is mirrored.. so if one fails, I just go out and buy another and I am good to go.

I did a little searching but just got more confused..

I think i want a raid 1 setup that has a controller that runs the drives independent of the computer.. that way i can take the drive (or i guess pair) anywhere and just plug it into a computer just like the cheap storage drives you can get.

So I looked and I found more stuff about "fake" raid or raid setups that are built to maximize speed, not be redundant.

So does anybody have any recomendations? I am ok buying an enclosure and seperate drives, but is that the solution?

check it out:

http://cgi.ebay.com/USB-2-0-Dual-Bay-Aluminum-SATA-External-HDD-Enclosure_W0QQitemZ160314909651QQihZ006QQcategoryZ3757QQssPageNameZWDVWQQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem

Is something like this what I need? seems pretty cheap. and I can just ebay some 3.5" drives and be done.

Also, I am not worried about speed as much as i am just having a system that is redundant. Also I work between 3 different computers so interchangability is key. Finally.. I have about 150GB of data now and don't see it growing more any time soon so I'd guess 300Gb is plenty of storage.


So is there an off the shelf solution? Should I look for the right enclosure and built it myself?

nakman
02-16-2009, 09:49 AM
If you run external SATA drives in that little box, would you be able switch between computers easily? Do you need to have drivers for the drives installed in each of the boxes, or would the USB interface resolve that for you? What if you switched between OS's, like XP on one and Vista on another? these questions are by no means rhetorical, as I'm considering running into a similar issue myself.. ;)

nuclearlemon
02-16-2009, 10:13 AM
what brand drives are you using? i've been very pleased with my lacie brick, especially now that i found out my "new" computer only has a 40gb hard drive:rolleyes:

rover67
02-16-2009, 11:50 AM
I tried Western Digital and now Seagate. Maybe I am too rough on them (they are transported quite a bit) maybe it's just me. I don't know.

I was wondering the same thing Tim, If that little box has the "raid controller" built in and would run independently of the computer...wondering if the USB interface would keep it "driverless"

there are some pretty pricy ones on fleabay tht hold like 1.5 terrabites and are ready to go.. but it just seems like buying an enclosure and a few cheaper drives might be the ticket.

I think your questions added to mine...

RockRunner
02-16-2009, 01:18 PM
but it just seems like buying an enclosure and a few cheaper drives might be the ticket.

I think your questions added to mine...

Just remember the saying "Remember the bitterness of poor quality is long remembered after the sweetness of low cost is forgotten."

I have several questions for you,


How much data do you NEED to travel with?
Do you back up your drives on DVDs pictures and movies etc?
How much money can you spend?
How are you transporting the drives?
What type of cases are you using?
Are you using 3.5" drives only or 2.5" drives?


If this data is super important to you than money should not be a concern. If this is the case I would suggest a Solid State Drive (SSD). They are available to the public now up to 256 GB. Check out his linkhttp://tiny.cc/SSD You can do just about anything to these drives and they won't break.

If money is an object to a certain degree I would get two of these http://tiny.cc/Externaldrive and use a Raid 1 type configuration or use a backup software to back up the number one external drive.

If that is still to much I would still stay with laptop drives as they are generally stronger than desktop drives. Also since they are smaller you can carry them in your pocket. I bet you could do it for about $200.

What ever you do, I would still back up the very important stuff to a DVD and make two copies. Give one to a friend/family member for safekeeping in case the inevitable happens, fire. Also a 1 terabyte drive that backs up everything, basically redundant but then again that is what I have to deal with all day long.

PS You can also sign up for auto back up services, you can access them from any computer but I not sure if you can add to them or get a storage site on the net, and you never have to carry a drive unless you are somewhere with no Internet service.

My 2 cents.

Hulk
02-16-2009, 05:55 PM
Here is what I use:
D-Link - DNS-323 - 2-Bay Network Attached Storage (NAS) Enclosure (http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/SearchTools/item-details.asp?EdpNo=2443662&CatId=207)

Works great. I have 2 500 GB Seagate drives, mirrored. I would not buy Western Digital -- too many failures for me to trust them.

The benefit of the NAS is that you can attach it via Ethernet and access it from all the computers on your network. Plus, it has a web server and an iTunes server.

Shark Bait
02-16-2009, 06:20 PM
HDS SMS100

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wrM6vWFXUAs

http://www.hds.com/products/storage-systems/simple-modular-storage.html

I guess it's not really "portable". :D

nakman
02-17-2009, 09:33 AM
Here is what I use:
D-Link - DNS-323 - 2-Bay Network Attached Storage (NAS) Enclosure (http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/SearchTools/item-details.asp?EdpNo=2443662&CatId=207)

Works great. I have 2 500 GB Seagate drives, mirrored. I would not buy Western Digital -- too many failures for me to trust them.

The benefit of the NAS is that you can attach it via Ethernet and access it from all the computers on your network. Plus, it has a web server and an iTunes server.

So Matt that's essentially the same thing that Marco posted, right? Any issues with drivers, with XP on one machine and Vista on another?

Hulk
02-17-2009, 11:05 AM
So Matt that's essentially the same thing that Marco posted, right?

The one that Marco posted hooks up via USB. You can use it on one computer at a time. For backup, that will work fine. You can use it on more than one computer, just not at the same time.

A NAS (network attached storage) connects to your network via Ethernet. It's kind of like a poor man's server. Multiple people can be attached to the device at the same time. At our house, we store our master Quickbooks files on the NAS, so both Karie and I can do bookkeeping chores from different computers, working off the same data file. We also store all our family photos there, for redundancy protection and so we can both access the files.

A NAS is nowhere near as fast as a real server, but it does work fine for what we use it for.

USB2 backups will be quicker than over Ethernet, but it's not a deal killer. Apple's Time Machine backs up over Ethernet too (but doesn't have a second mirrored drive).

Before you buy anything, I highly recommend doing some reading over at Small Network Builder (http://www.smallnetbuilder.com/content/view/85/93/). Their reviews (http://www.smallnetbuilder.com/content/blogcategory/50/75/) are great.

The demand for NAS seems to be growing. When I bought the DLink a few years back, it was the only game in town other than the Buffalo LinkStation. I liked the DLink because I could purchase my own hard drives and configure it how I wanted.

Now there are lots of NAS devices to choose from.

Hulk
02-17-2009, 11:15 AM
Any issues with drivers, with XP on one machine and Vista on another?

There probably won't be any issue with drivers for either the one that I posted or the one that Marco posted. USB2 devices are plug and play these days.

If you're going to use it with both PCs and Macs, you'll need to make sure that you format the hard drives to Fat32 or EXT2 rather than NTFS -- Macs can read NTFS but cannot write to it (without doing some work (http://www.insanelymac.com/forum/index.php?showtopic=38920&st=0)). I'm not sure if you can format drives to FAT32 under Vista anymore, but I'm sure you can read it, so you might want to set up the hard drives from an XP computer. If you're not going to use it for Macs, you should format it to NTFS, which is a better file system.

OTOH, a NAS becomes part of your network. The nice thing is that you can use it from both PCs and Macs with no problems at all. IIRC, you must set it up from a Windows computer, but once set up, you can access it from any computer on your local area network.

Hulk
02-17-2009, 11:59 AM
So Matt that's essentially the same thing that Marco posted, right?

I just looked more closely at the one that Marco posted.

Access to two SATA hard drive within one power adapter and single USB cable connection. Two hard drives operate individually.
So this allows you to set up 2 HDDs in one enclosure, but there is no RAID controller. So you cannot set these up as mirrored drives (RAID 1).

The DLink that I posted allows you to set it up as mirrored drives. So you put in two 500 GB drives, and you get 500 GB capacity. When you write to one drive, it automatically creates the exact same file on the other drive. The theory is that both hard drives won't fail on the same day. When one does go bad, you pop it out and insert a new one in that bay. The new drive is then automatically mirrored to the old good drive, and you're quickly back to having redundancy.

It doesn't need to be a NAS to have the RAID 1 mirrored drives. For example, this unit from LaCie (http://www.lacie.com/us/products/product.htm?pid=11140) has mirrored drives but does not attach via Ethernet.

Back to the original question. Make sure to buy a device that is set up for RAID 1 (http://www.bestpricecomputers.co.uk/glossary/raid-1.htm) (mirrored drives). Can you build your own? Probably, but the enclosures are fairly inexpensive these days. Looks like Western Digital has a cheap enclosure that comes with the drives (http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/SearchTools/item-details.asp?EdpNo=4082295&CatId=2422) and is RAID capable right out of the box.

rover67
02-17-2009, 12:27 PM
Wow, lots of great info here. Thansk Guys!

I think I know where my system is breaking down after reading what Tom posted... I am using a single drive as my *everything* storage, and moving it around from computer to computer. Moving it around I think is eventually what kills it.. so maybe that's what I need to avoid.

I get lazy and end up with files everywhere if i leave it at home though.

So.. I think this is the plan. Get either that LaCie drive that Matt posted which is truly a RAID 1 setup and is pretty portable if i need it to be, or buy one of the NAS storage "boxes" and leave it at the house. I am also going to get a solid state memory stick drive that has enough space on it to move big stuff around, and when it fills up have the disciplin to take it home and upload the info to the permanent safe storage.

After reading and thinking.. I think keeping the drives portable and keeping them safe is impossible to truly do at the same time...

I really dig the NAS storage solutions... especially if I can set it up to be accessed over the internet. The D-link one you have Matt looks pretty sweet..

Shark Bait
02-17-2009, 10:45 PM
A NAS is nowhere near as fast as a real server, but it does work fine for what we use it for.

USB2 backups will be quicker than over Ethernet, but it's not a deal killer. Apple's Time Machine backs up over Ethernet too (but doesn't have a second mirrored drive).


Sounds like you've done a lot of research, Matt. So, the access time is OK? That seems like a great price.

nakman
02-17-2009, 11:09 PM
Alright, I'm liking the idea of that Western Digital (http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/SearchTools/item-details.asp?EdpNo=4082295&CatId=2422)jobbie that Matt posted up.

So next silly question: would I want to hook that up to a desktop computer via USB and just know that I had to leave that computer on all the time to access it? Or could I just buy a USB-Cat5 cable adapter (http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/SearchTools/item-details.asp?EdpNo=3246389&CatId=444) and plug the thing directly into the back of my wireless router?

We tend to just turn the computers on when we need them, and not leave them on the whole time. Come to think of it, I'd like to hook our printer up this same way, does anyone do that? sorry for the digression Marco.. :o

Hulk
02-18-2009, 12:47 AM
So next silly question: would I want to hook that up to a desktop computer via USB and just know that I had to leave that computer on all the time to access it? Or could I just buy a USB-Cat5 cable adapter (http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/SearchTools/item-details.asp?EdpNo=3246389&CatId=444) and plug the thing directly into the back of my wireless router?

That's a USB extension cord. It won't turn your USB port into an ethernet port.

That's the joy of the NAS -- all your computers can be off, and you can still access your files from a remote location. Or you can access your secure redundant storage from any computer in the house without having to move the hard drive.

Hulk
02-18-2009, 12:49 AM
Sounds like you've done a lot of research, Matt. So, the access time is OK? That seems like a great price.

NAS is kind of slow compared to a real server. I don't store working files for Photoshop or Illustrator on it. It's fine for working on html or Word docs.

nakman
02-18-2009, 10:07 AM
Ok, so the NAS allows you to connect via ethernet, while the Western Digital thing is just USB, so it requires a computer? I think I got it..

FJBen
02-18-2009, 11:02 AM
Here's what I set all of our smaller jobsites up with.

Buffalo Servers
Buffalo LinkStation Mini LS-WS500GL/R1 - NAS server

WS500GL/R1 - NAS - 500 GB - Serial ATA-150 - HD 250 GB x 2 - RAID 0, 1 - Gigabit Ethernet

Ultra Compact. Ultra Silent. Ultra Reliable.
Buffalo’s LinkStation Mini™ is an ultra compact, fan-less, network attached, dual-drive data storage device. Its palm sized form factor and very silent operation make this NAS unit an ideal addition to your entertainment center. Its low power consumption is attractive for those leaving the unit powered on 24/7.

The built-in Web Access feature lets you access your files anytime via a Web browser from anywhere! A built-in DLNA CERTIFIED™ media server makes streaming audio and visual content to any DLNA player or PC a snap.

Business class features like Active Directory support make this portable NAS a good solution for IT personnel that has to serve remote office locations.

The 500Gb one is $219 at CDW, probably cheaper elsewhere.

Hulk
02-18-2009, 01:12 PM
Here's what I set all of our smaller jobsites up with.
Buffalo LinkStation Mini LS-WS500GL/R1 - NAS server

That's a good deal. The Buffalo units were a lot more money a few years ago, which is why I used the D-Link unit to build my own.

Here's what I would buy today (if I didn't buy the Buffalo):

D-Link - DNS-323 - 2-Bay Network Attached Storage (NAS) Enclosure (http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/SearchTools/item-details.asp?EdpNo=2443662&CatId=207)

Hitachi Hard Drive - 1TB, 7200RPM, 16MB, SATA-300 (http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/SearchTools/item-details.asp?EdpNo=4306125&Sku=TSD-1000H4) (2 of these)

Total spent: $335. Free shipping, no tax.

It will take you 5 minutes to assemble, and you'll end up with almost 1000 GB of mirrored storage.

Hulk
02-18-2009, 01:24 PM
The comparable Buffalo unit to the D-Link + (2) Hitachi HDDs would be this:

Buffalo LinkStation Pro Duo LS-W2.0TGL/R1 - NAS server (http://www.cdw.com/shop/products/default.aspx?EDC=1435923)

$360.

A little misleading, because they list capacity as 2 TB (RAID 0) rather the 1 TB (RAID 1).

So it's still $25 more, but you don't have to assemble it.

Hulk
02-18-2009, 01:26 PM
Ok, so the NAS allows you to connect via ethernet, while the Western Digital thing is just USB, so it requires a computer? I think I got it.

Yep. If you're only backing up one computer, the Western Digital is a fine solution. The NAS provides networking options for those with multiple computers.

Shark Bait
02-26-2009, 09:01 AM
Not sure if it's mirrored. 1TB Western Digital MyBook World Edition (http://www.nytimes.com/2009/02/26/technology/personaltech/26mybook.html?src=linkedin), $229.

Hulk
03-03-2009, 02:04 PM
This is not mirrored, but it's a good deal: 1 TB of storage in an enclosure.

http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/searchtools/item-Details.asp?EdpNo=4140385&sku=H452-1006&SRCCODE=WEM1864BY&cm_mmc=Email-_-Main-_-WEM1864-_-Email

rover67
03-03-2009, 02:11 PM
This is what I am going to do... I have noodled on it for a while and think it is the best option for me. Maybe get a solid state USB drive with decent capacity to actually cart around like Tom said. Is this kind of setup easy to get going and secure if i try to do the remote access trick?



That's a good deal. The Buffalo units were a lot more money a few years ago, which is why I used the D-Link unit to build my own.

Here's what I would buy today (if I didn't buy the Buffalo):

D-Link - DNS-323 - 2-Bay Network Attached Storage (NAS) Enclosure (http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/SearchTools/item-details.asp?EdpNo=2443662&CatId=207)

Hitachi Hard Drive - 1TB, 7200RPM, 16MB, SATA-300 (http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/SearchTools/item-details.asp?EdpNo=4306125&Sku=TSD-1000H4) (2 of these)

Total spent: $335. Free shipping, no tax.

It will take you 5 minutes to assemble, and you'll end up with almost 1000 GB of mirrored storage.

Hulk
03-03-2009, 03:34 PM
Is this kind of setup easy to get going and secure if i try to do the remote access trick?

It's easy to set up, although it takes some time because you have to reformat the HDDs. I haven't used the remote access yet, but it shouldn't be hard to do.

corsair23
03-04-2009, 01:48 AM
Here is what I use:
D-Link - DNS-323 - 2-Bay Network Attached Storage (NAS) Enclosure (http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/SearchTools/item-details.asp?EdpNo=2443662&CatId=207)

Works great. I have 2 500 GB Seagate drives, mirrored. I would not buy Western Digital -- too many failures for me to trust them.

The benefit of the NAS is that you can attach it via Ethernet and access it from all the computers on your network. Plus, it has a web server and an iTunes server.


Considering going with the D-Link dealyo...My WD My Book is starting to die at just 2 years old :mad: - I'm with Matt on lack of confidence with WD drives lately. Most people I talk to think WD drives are the best but the new internal WD drive I installed in my computer when I completely rebuilt my computer has made disconcerting noises since day 1 (still hasn't failed thankfully) and the WD My Book that is just now 2 years old has started making some serious thunking noises when it starts up (seems to be a common problem out there) and it will now lock up at times or refuse to start up :(

I'm considering the D-Link with some 500GB drives (my My Book is only 250GB and not even 1/4 full) but not in the RAID1 (mirrored) configuration. I need to read up on it some more but apparently there is an issue if one HD fails you can't just pop in a replacement drive and be back up to speed as both drives would have to be formatted...Seems wrong because what is the point then of having the mirrored drive for the extra security?

My other though would be to just get 2 external HDs and do a weekly backup from one to the other...External HD are getting dirt cheap.

Anyway, found some decent pricing on the D-Link for those interested:

Amazon.com (http://www.amazon.com/D-Link-DNS-323-Network-Storage-Enclosure/dp/B000GK8LVE) - $147 after rebate w/ free shipping

Buydig.com (http://www.buydig.com/shop/product.aspx?omid=108&ref=cnet&utm_source=Cnet&utm_medium=cpc&utm_campaign=DLIDNS323&sku=DLIDNS323) - $144 after rebate w/ free shipping

Hulk
03-04-2009, 01:44 PM
...but not in the RAID1 (mirrored) configuration. I need to read up on it some more but apparently there is an issue if one HD fails you can't just pop in a replacement drive and be back up to speed as both drives would have to be formatted...Seems wrong because what is the point then of having the mirrored drive for the extra security?

Anyway, found some decent pricing on the D-Link for those interested:

Amazon.com (http://www.amazon.com/D-Link-DNS-323-Network-Storage-Enclosure/dp/B000GK8LVE) - $147 after rebate w/ free shipping

Buydig.com (http://www.buydig.com/shop/product.aspx?omid=108&ref=cnet&utm_source=Cnet&utm_medium=cpc&utm_campaign=DLIDNS323&sku=DLIDNS323) - $144 after rebate w/ free shipping

Those are good prices. Tiger Direct has it for $154, and usually they are the lowest.

The whole point of running mirrored drives in these units is to be able to pop out a failed drive, replace it with a new one, which then will be automatically written with the data from the good drive. Have you read somewhere that the D-Link has a problem performing as advertised? I haven't had a HDD die on me yet to test this functionality myself.

corsair23
03-04-2009, 02:48 PM
The whole point of running mirrored drives in these units is to be able to pop out a failed drive, replace it with a new one, which then will be automatically written with the data from the good drive. Have you read somewhere that the D-Link has a problem performing as advertised? I haven't had a HDD die on me yet to test this functionality myself.

Agreed on the point of running mirrored drives and one of the reasons I am considering going the D-Link route.

However, it was in some of the reviews (probably either on Amazon or CNet) that I read about the issue with the mirrored drives and that when one of the drives failed, both drives would need to be formatted to get back up and running. I need to do more digging/investigation to see if the review was merely user error/misunderstanding or true.

CardinalFJ60
03-04-2009, 03:26 PM
also check out drobo...it's somewhat popular in the photography world. I honestly don't know much about it...but does what I think you're asking about.

Hulk
03-04-2009, 05:24 PM
They are sweet, but you can set up something similar for cheaper.

rover67
03-13-2009, 09:35 AM
Just got my DNS-323 and hitachi drives in the mail yesterday.

Got it all set up and running last night.

It's a sweet setup.

With remote access I think all of my problems will be solved, thanks for all the help guys!

Hulk
03-13-2009, 01:48 PM
Good deal. Did you set it up for remote access? I need to do that.

Shark Bait
03-13-2009, 01:50 PM
I bought a Linksys N router recently which allows you to set up a network drive. I just haven't set it up yet.

I'm about ready to set up my Ooma hub, though. :D

rover67
03-13-2009, 02:28 PM
Haven't set it up for remote access yet.. our internet is down at the moment awaiting a new modem.

I'll let you know how that goes when i get it going.

corsair23
03-17-2009, 04:31 PM
Doing some more research on the D-Link and I came across the fact that they also make a DNS-321. Then I found a helpful review of the DNS-321:

http://www.smallnetbuilder.com/content/view/30520/79/

The DNS-321 is less expensive than the DNS-323, mainly because it does not have the print server support nor does it support BitTorrent downloads in the NAS. Not sure I really need either of that? What caught my eye is that in the tests, the DNS-321 is actually faster (read/write) on files 64MB and larger. Guess it depends upon what your average file size is that you are working with whether this fact is good, or bad.

What still has me concerned is this:

"While this test doesn't simulate what happens in an actual failure (since you wouldn't be reinserting the same drive), we run the same test on all RAID products. And the 321 is the only product we've encountered that requires a fresh drive in order to correctly resync the RAID 1 array (at least for one of the drives!). I'll leave it up to you to decide whether this is a reasonable requirement."

Unfortunately it doesn't appear that disk failure was tested originally on the DNS-323 as it was on the DNS-321 (after people complained on the blogs about the 323). Disk failure was tested on the 4 drive DNS-343 and the results were the same as above. My concern remains about whether the good drive must be reformatted as well or just the new drive...


Here is the review of the DNS-323 if you are interested:

http://www.smallnetbuilder.com/content/view/29671/75/


Oh, and the DNS-323 is running under $130 right now on Amazon (and elsewhere I'm sure) after a $30 D-Link rebate. The DNS-321 is running under $100 after the same $30 rebate.

Hulk
03-17-2009, 05:06 PM
"While this test doesn't simulate what happens in an actual failure (since you wouldn't be reinserting the same drive), we run the same test on all RAID products. And the 321 is the only product we've encountered that requires a fresh drive in order to correctly resync the RAID 1 array (at least for one of the drives!). I'll leave it up to you to decide whether this is a reasonable requirement."

Oh, and the DNS-323 is running under $130 right now on Amazon (and elsewhere I'm sure) after a $30 D-Link rebate. The DNS-321 is running under $100 after the same $30 rebate.

It's a reasonable requirement (for me) to insert a fresh drive. I'm not sure why I would want to tempt fate by inserting a drive with some pre-existing hours on it.

All drives will be formatted because the DNS-323 uses the Ext2 file system (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ext2) rather than a Microsoft or Apple file system. Is that what you are saying?

Or are you saying that if one mirrored drive fails, the other one cannot serve as a stand-alone drive, to be mirrored again when a fresh drive is added? That's the whole point of the device, so I hope this is not true.

As for the 323 vs. the 321, I don't know. I have the 323, so that is what I have recommended to others in the past. The 321 is probably fine too.

Hulk
03-17-2009, 05:08 PM
Wow, the 323 has its own web site:
http://wiki.dns323.info/

corsair23
03-17-2009, 06:40 PM
It's a reasonable requirement (for me) to insert a fresh drive. I'm not sure why I would want to tempt fate by inserting a drive with some pre-existing hours on it.

Agreed :thumb: - Figure the reason you are replacing the drive is that it has failed.

Or are you saying that if one mirrored drive fails, the other one cannot serve as a stand-alone drive, to be mirrored again when a fresh drive is added? That's the whole point of the device, so I hope this is not true..

Not saying that, but I have read of issues with the "mirroring" setup which is why I am doing the digging. Unfortunately I have not yet found a post or thread of where a user has had a drive fail, popped in a replacement, and was back up and running in short order with a mirrored setup. I've read a lot about syncing errors and problems and at least one post where a user stated that when one of his drives failed the DNS-323 wanted to reformat both drives (the old good one and the new one) when he tried to recover the system.

I'm with you...The whole purpose of this for me is to insure that all of my pictures and files etc. that I cannot replace are backed up to a reasonable level. After my My Book failed I decided that having the files only backed up in one location is bad ju-ju. CD/DVD backups are too much of a hassle so I was looking into either going with two external hard drives or this NAS solution. The NAS solution is nice because it does the mirroring for you. Maybe I could do the same thing via Raid 1 setup with just two external drives and leave out the NAS part.

corsair23
03-18-2009, 03:16 PM
CD/DVD backups are too much of a hassle so I was looking into either going with two external hard drives or this NAS solution. The NAS solution is nice because it does the mirroring for you. Maybe I could do the same thing via Raid 1 setup with just two external drives and leave out the NAS part.

Guess I am behind the times...

WD My Book Mirror Edition - Dual external HDs w/ Raid 1 (http://accessories.us.dell.com/sna/productdetail.aspx?sku=A1763396&cs=19&c=us&l=en&dgc=SS&cid=27530&lid=627063)

1 TB of storage (2 1-TBs mirrored drives) for $200-$300? Pretty attractive

Not a NAS so no remote access but if you really don't need that, this is an alternative. Based on my experience with WD drives I'm not sure I'd trust them but then again there are 2 drives, mirrored, with a 3-yr warranty...