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View Full Version : What oil are you guys running in your 2F or 3FE?


cbmontgo
04-29-2009, 08:57 PM
15W, 10W or 5W? Conventional/synthetic? Any other seasonal suggestions for this climate here in Colorado?

nuclearlemon
04-29-2009, 10:20 PM
20w50

subzali
04-29-2009, 10:25 PM
10W30 or 10W40 mostly. I could try 20W50 in the summer maybe. I wouldn't bother with synthetic, these engines weren't designed with that fancy stuff in mind :p: I do run Valvoline though.

MDH33
04-30-2009, 07:15 AM
15W40 Rotella. :thumb:

cbmontgo
04-30-2009, 08:03 AM
Wow. Those are some heavy weight oils. I have usually run 10W 30 like Matt.

What is the advantage of a heavier weight like that?

MDH33
04-30-2009, 08:13 AM
Wow. Those are some heavy weight oils. I have usually run 10W 30 like Matt.

What is the advantage of a heavier weight like that?

Doesn't seep past old seals or blow by worn out rings as easily. :hill:

subzali
04-30-2009, 08:13 AM
keeps it from blowing by the rings and burning :p:

Or leaking out of the leaky seals :D

EDIT: Martin beat me to it.

DaveInDenver
04-30-2009, 08:41 AM
Wow. Those are some heavy weight oils. I have usually run 10W 30 like Matt.

What is the advantage of a heavier weight like that?
What is your reasoning behind /not/ using heavy oil? Probably not 'cause of the gas mileage... :-) But no, really, what are you thinking? I could see using 10W30 in a brand newly rebuilt 2F pretty easily, everything is tight, freshly machined and current production internal parts (which are likely better made than the original parts). Even the cheap rings made now are probably going to more precise than what was made 30 years ago. It has to be with CNC and better process control. That said, I would still stick to the owner's manual recommendations on a rebuilt 2F.

Like the guys said, it's what works in the F engines. What does the owner's manual for a F/2F/3F say to use? Probably straight weight 20 & 30 or maybe a 10W40 & 20W50 right? Well, unless you are operating your FJ40 in 'extreme' environs like at the equator, Gobi Desert or Antarctica and then you might have to use something different. Anyway, the engine was designed in the 1950 (or if you believe stolen from a Chevy 261 which itself morphed from engines designed in the 1930s). Tolerances are not tight, oil pump design is optimized for the thicker lube they had back then, the volume of the sump, etc. It all indicates that 10W40 is probably OK, but motor lube that's more like honey than water (i.e. SAE30W or 20W50, etc.) are probably more like what the design is made to use. Even my relatively modern (compared to a F) 22R doesn't much care for the 0W30 and 5W30 stuff, oil consumption goes up and the interstate oil pressure is lower than I like to see, 'specially in the summer. I use 10W30 in the mighty 22R-E, although I do splurge for Syntec since all the seals are nice and new, so it doesn't leak.

Uncle Ben
04-30-2009, 09:04 AM
15W40 Rotella. :thumb:

x2!!! :thumb::thumb:

cbmontgo
04-30-2009, 09:13 AM
Using 10W 30 has been out of habit for many years, but this is why I am asking the question. Heavier oils also circulate more slowly and cause greater engine wear during cold starts in the winter, or so I hear.

cbmontgo
04-30-2009, 09:14 AM
x2!!! :thumb::thumb:

Is this Rotella synthetic?

DaveInDenver
04-30-2009, 09:25 AM
Using 10W 30 has been out of habit for many years, but this is why I am asking the question. Heavier oils also circulate more slowly and cause greater engine wear during cold starts in the winter, or so I hear.
But oil that is not viscous enough may not build pressure through the pump. All pumps have an optimal viscosity to hit their best pressure & flow. Ideally you want just enough pressure to force enough volume to have just above zero pressure at the end of the line. If the oil is too thin the pump can't push enough oil through the bearings, up the journals and across the valve train to effectively reduce wear and friction.

It's not the same for all engines and all conditions for all engines. So what you run will depend on what works.

My old engine with 187K on it had lower pressure than my new engine because it was more worn out inside and the clearance between the crank and bearings was larger, so more pressure drop at the bottom before ever even flowing to the top. It preferred 10W40 in the summer to get the same pressure my 20K old engine does now with 10W30. Dean runs 20W50 in his 20R in the summer to get the same pressure as my fresh 22R block does on 10W30. Also heavier oil flowing slower might be exactly what you want, since the F has like 2 gallons of oil it does not need to be filtered as much to stay fresh and acts more like a cushion between the cam/push rods/lifters interfaces.

The point is that thinner is not always preferred. You want the /right/ viscosity.

cbmontgo
04-30-2009, 09:47 AM
But oil that is not viscous enough may not build pressure through the pump. All pumps have an optimal viscosity to hit their best pressure & flow. Ideally you want just enough pressure to force enough volume to have just above zero pressure at the end of the line. If the oil is too thin the pump can't push enough oil through the bearings, up the journals and across the valve train to effectively reduce wear and friction.

It's not the same for all engines and all conditions for all engines. So what you run will depend on what works.

My old engine with 187K on it had lower pressure than my new engine because it was more worn out inside and the clearance between the crank and bearings was larger, so more pressure drop at the bottom before ever even flowing to the top. It preferred 10W40 in the summer to get the same pressure my 20K old engine does now with 10W30. Dean runs 20W50 in his 20R in the summer to get the same pressure as my fresh 22R block does on 10W30. Also heavier oil flowing slower might be exactly what you want, since the F has like 2 gallons of oil it does not need to be filtered as much to stay fresh and acts more like a cushion between the cam/push rods/lifters interfaces.

The point is that thinner is not always preferred. You want the /right/ viscosity.

This is great stuff...thanks, Dave. I may go with a heavier weight and try it out when I change the oil this weekend. I really appreciate your help here.

Rezarf
04-30-2009, 11:58 AM
I just pump my crankcase full of grease like my steering box.

;)

10w40 here, usually Valvoline, but if something else is one sale... at 2 gallons per change, I will jump on any of the big name brands.

Drew

SteveH
04-30-2009, 03:49 PM
I ran 20w-50 years ago, and it cost me 1 mpg on the highway.

I now run 10w-30 or 40, whatever's on sale or with a rebate. It's all a lot better than the SF-rated oil sold in 1978, regardless of brand. For the summer, I'd run 10w-40.

cbmontgo
05-01-2009, 08:46 AM
Thanks for the input, guys.

Uncle Ben
05-01-2009, 11:25 AM
Is this Rotella synthetic?

NO! :zilla: rules! Unless you have allowed the marketing brainwashing of the "high mileage -0 maintenance for a bazillion miles" domestic auto manufactures have piped into the media trying to convice folks to buy "high quality" "American" made cars (most of which use assembled components from Mexico). Then stick to name brand petrolium based oil in the low tech engines. (hows that for a long run on sentence? :rolleyes:) and change it at normal intervals regulated buy how you use the vehicle. Dino clings better thus journals remained lubed over night. Liquid is not compressible and oil pumps are positive displacement type so there is no more oil starvation at cold start than there is on a hot start.

Uncle Ben
05-01-2009, 11:29 AM
I ran 20w-50 years ago, and it cost me 1 mpg on the highway.

I now run 10w-30 or 40, whatever's on sale or with a rebate. It's all a lot better than the SF-rated oil sold in 1978, regardless of brand. For the summer, I'd run 10w-40.

1 mpg? You mean less than the amount of inconsistent tire pressure caused by CO2 filling? WOW! ;)

Rezarf
05-01-2009, 02:10 PM
1 mpg? You mean less than the amount of inconsistent tire pressure caused by CO2 filling? WOW! ;)

What C02 can do that?:bowdown::eek:

CardinalFJ60
05-01-2009, 03:19 PM
I've found that my tire pressure can fluctuate alot from ambient temps and/or just from rolling resistance heating the tires up. I try to 'bleed' and re-fill with actual air when I have filled with CO2 a few times.

Also...when I went to 20/50 last summer I lost about 3mpgs. Methinks I'll be going with the 15/40 this time around.

Rzeppa
05-03-2009, 09:13 AM
10W40 Valvoline dino, changed every 2500 miles (4000 kms on the truck), OEM oil filters.

wesintl
05-03-2009, 05:58 PM
my F's and 2F's always like 20w-50 the best.

leiniesred
05-04-2009, 11:04 AM
3VZ-E with 270,000 miles works well on 20W/50.
I got 18 MPG on the way home yesterday with a total average speed of 61 MPH.
My rod bearings are all too loose too.


I change it every year. (maybe 5,000 miles)
I have run 20W-50 for over 100,000 miles.