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View Full Version : Frame Ripple on 85 FJ60


CBone
05-20-2009, 08:11 AM
I referred to it as frame ripple, as opposed to frame rust because the rust on my 60s frame is only surface stuff that comes off pretty easily. However, in the exact location on both sides, I have these ripples or waves going on with the inner channel piece. What's this all about?

subzali
05-20-2009, 08:50 AM
right behind the rear wheels? I bet it got rear ended...the fix is to attach the rear of your truck to a tree and hit the end of the strap at full force...that should stretch it out and get it all straight again :p:

Honestly I don't know, just thought that was funny. It might have gotten rear ended sometime in the past though...

MDH33
05-20-2009, 08:54 AM
I'll go look under mine and see if looks any different. Could be frame rust that is swelling and deforming it.

DaveInDenver
05-20-2009, 09:10 AM
right behind the rear wheels? I bet it got rear ended...the fix is to attach the rear of your truck to a tree and hit the end of the strap at full force...that should stretch it out and get it all straight again :p:

Honestly I don't know, just thought that was funny. It might have gotten rear ended sometime in the past though...
This is more or less my first thought, accident, overloaded payload or towing, etc. I'd guess that unless the frame is way off from spec that leaving it and adding some gussets to stabilize it is all that you can do. It's a Cruiser afterall, that's way better than the worst that they've been put though.

Man Jerk
05-20-2009, 09:22 AM
this is pretty common on 60 series. A lot of people with cut that inner section out (major PITA) and box the frame in the back.

That inner piece likes to collect moisture and junk.

nuclearlemon
05-20-2009, 09:26 AM
I've seen that on a couple..i think the rust is just causign the frame to shift and swell.

60wag
05-20-2009, 10:05 AM
x2 Its the rust pushing the metal around, not an impact. Unless you really want to replace everything, I wouldn't touch it.

Rezarf
05-20-2009, 10:25 AM
Looks like rust creating the damage like ice on a sidewalk crack.

CBone
05-20-2009, 11:55 AM
I liked Matt's approach the most, but think I'll just let it be. Seems to me to be what most of you described, some rust between the two pieces has swelled over time, because the stuff between the two rails is flaky and comes out.

Thanks

subzali
05-20-2009, 12:02 PM
yeah don't take my advice on that one...that was tongue in cheek...:o

DaveInDenver
05-20-2009, 12:12 PM
yeah don't take my advice on that one...that was tongue in cheek...:o
I actually do that on my truck to de-tweak the bed. The WilderNest puts a lot of spreading force on the bed (there are big springs that push the top up to help open it). This force causes over time the two bed sides to widen. So I put a strap across the rear cargo hooks that came through a heavy snap link in the middle and then straight back to a rope fastened to a tree. I let the truck roll slowly downhill to shock the two sides back parallel. This actually works a whole lot better than trying to use a ratcheting come-along or something...

Uncle Ben
05-20-2009, 12:13 PM
Personally, I would dig and blast the dirt and rust scale out of there and get some epoxy or Rustolium paint in there to seal it. IMHO that would buy you the most time before you either have to fix it of replace the frame/truck.

nakman
05-20-2009, 12:18 PM
Write it off... your only viable solution is lift it so you can run 40" tires, sawzall the fenders, exocage it, and wheel the crap out of it.. it's a trail truck now. Then daily drive a 100 series. :)

MDH33
05-20-2009, 12:46 PM
Carlton, I crawled under mine and it looks the same. I wouldn't worry too much about it. Like UB said, it wouldn't hurt to dig out the really flaky stuff and coat it. Easy enough to just use some old oil, or better yet, slop some POR15 and chassi-coat on it.

Rzeppa
05-21-2009, 07:54 PM
I agree with Ige, Bruce and Matt. The rust caused the swelling. I'm not a metallurgist but I R an engineer, and have spent considerable time researching ferrous corrosion.