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-   -   Et lux in tenebris lucet, et tenebrae eam nom comprehenderunt, (http://www.risingsun4x4club.org/forum2/showthread.php?t=13610)

Tranny Frank 07-24-2010 12:07 PM

Et lux in tenebris lucet, et tenebrae eam nom comprehenderunt,
 
Howdy Colorado Cruisers,

http://www.jeepforum.com/forum/f8/cl...ml#post9842993

If the light hurts, dont ban me or close the thread, when you get used to it, things are much better,
I am the messenger, please do not kill me.

Dr. Schlegs 07-24-2010 01:45 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Tranny Frank (Post 156399)
Howdy Colorado Cruisers,

http://www.jeepforum.com/forum/f8/cl...ml#post9842993

If the light hurts, dont ban me or close the thread, when you get used to it, things are much better,
I am the messenger, please do not kill me.


Looks like they are tired of you too. That is all I get from it.

Tranny Frank 07-24-2010 02:14 PM

very thick oil, inboard CV joint
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Dr. Schlegs (Post 156401)
Looks like they are tired of you too. That is all I get from it.

Understandable, when you are in the darkness, you only read and see what you want to,

perhaps you would like to explain to me what lubrication differences are needed between a "Birfield" and a inboard CV joint on a Toyota 4 runners,

I will help there are none,
If I rebuilt a automatic transmission and poured 140w oil into it, it would work,
It would work and move the vehicle if I poured water in it,

Would it last as long??

Nope

There is no difference between these examples than what happens when you use a #2 grease in a component that is designed for a semi fluid grease..

It is a simple as that, as soon as some one in the Toyota circles, that has a background in mechanical engineering , stops and looks at the spindle bushing in the steering knuckle then they will realize the need for a semi fluid grease, and all of this will make sense,

So far I havent found him, he is out there, I have contacted everybody in the Toyota aftermarket, everyone is quite happy pouring 140w in the auto tranny and wondering why is doesnt last as long,

Tranny Frank 07-24-2010 03:56 PM

Mechanic A and Mechanic B
 
Mechanic A says this is the correct position for one of the lube grooves in the spindle hub bushing


http://i739.photobucket.com/albums/x...CoreComp_2.jpg

Tranny Frank 07-24-2010 04:06 PM

Mechanic A and Mechanic B
 
Mechanic B says this is the correct position of lube entry point
http://i739.photobucket.com/albums/x...CoreComp_1.jpg

Tranny Frank 07-24-2010 04:15 PM

Toyota
 
Is it Mechanic A?
Is it Mechanic B?

Lots of Toyota clowns have told me there is a seal here,

Lots of Toyota clowns have told me that lube flow was entirely impossible thru the Spindle,
Called me a liar, moron and a idiot, for being mechanic B

These Toyota clowns sell parts, and use these forums to pump in BS to harvest more mushrooms,

IT is a bright light, and it hurts, ban me if you will, dont care,

AxleIke 07-24-2010 04:29 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Tranny Frank (Post 156402)
perhaps you would like to explain to me what lubrication differences are needed between a "Birfield" and a inboard CV joint on a Toyota 4 runners,

Can't help you there. I do know that my inboard CV joints are fully sealed and filled with #2 axle grease. Same with my outter joints. Fully sealed, #2 axle grease.

I don't know much about birfields, so I have no idea on how they compare.

Each axle has 150k on it. I rebuilt them.

FJBRADY 07-24-2010 04:50 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Tranny Frank (Post 156405)
Lots of Toyota clowns

Yeah and I am Homey D. Clown

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_QhuBIkPXn0

Tranny Frank 07-24-2010 06:17 PM

oh #2 axle grease??
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by AxleIke (Post 156406)
Can't help you there. I do know that my inboard CV joints are fully sealed and filled with #2 axle grease. Same with my outter joints. Fully sealed, #2 axle grease.

I don't know much about birfields, so I have no idea on how they compare.

Each axle has 150k on it. I rebuilt them.

,

You didnt use the thinner grease packets that come with the rebuild kits??
they tell me thats bad news,
what is axle grease any way? been reading and researching grease for over a year now and thats a new term, for me. heres one of many warnings not to use exactly what the FSM for Toyota indicates to use in a CV joint,
#2 molybedamed lithium chasis grease is a regular old grease, nothing special,

CV JOINT LUBRICATION

CV joints require a special type of high temperature, high pressure grease. Ordinary chassis grease or multipurpose grease should never be used in a CV joint.

The condition of the grease as well as the amount of grease in the joint will determine how long the joint lasts. One of the purposes of the boot that surrounds the CV joint is to keep dirt and moisture out. The other is to keep the grease in. If a boot is torn, cracked, punctured or comes loose, dirt and water can contaminate the grease in the joint causing accelerated wear which will eventually lead to joint failure. Loss of grease can also occur which will further shorten the life of the joint. So the boots must be in good condition to protect the joint.

Tranny Frank 07-24-2010 06:23 PM

Your not a clown, your a mushroom sucking up bull ****, heres the clown leader
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by FJBRADY (Post 156407)
Yeah and I am Homey D. Clown

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_QhuBIkPXn0

Having said all that, here's a primer on what I think is happening with your front axle. Looking under your front end from the front bumper, the front axle housing terminates at each end in spherical steel structure. In this sphere (STEERING KNUCKLE) are your birfield joints. The sphere is supposed to be full of thick grease. The axle housing (including diff) is supposed to be full of thin gear oil. Right as the axle housing flares into that sphere there is a seal through which the actual axle shaft pierces. The seal (AXLE SEAL) keeps the two types of fluids (thick grease/thin oil) apart. Another seal (STEERING KNUCKLE SEAL) keeps the thick grease from leaking out of the sphere onto the outside of the spherical surface you can see. It is normal for there to be some weeping here, and these seals slide directly against the outside of the sphere, leaving "edges" of thick grease built up at the limits of the wheel's turning ability. Normal.

Over time, the AXLE seal wears and allows the thin grease into the steering knuckle. Here, it thins the grease out, and the grease runs out of the steering knuckle through the STEERING KNUCKLE SEALS, and also sometimes even onto the wheels via the drive plates. After awhile, the differential oil is low, and the steering knuckle is low - endangering both expensive components.

Here is where things typically go horribly awry on a LandCruiser - owing to its uniqueness and the typical ignorance of many mechanics on these somewhat rare aspects.

The lowest form of this mechanic ignorance takes this form: On the upper forward part of the steering knuckle is a square plug. This plug is only to be used to CHECK the grease level in the steering knuckle. But mechanics think this is to FILL the knuckle. It should only be used as an indicator of the grease level since the last disassembly and repack. Not for adding. Putting grease in here does not get it to the actual birfield joint - which is the place where it needs to be. So, many mechanics simply stuff grease in here and send the LandCruiser owner on his merry way thinking he's properly serviced the knuckle/joint. Unfortunately, the birfield resides in a separate chamber inside of the steering knuckle and it's still devoid of grease no matter how much you jam in that plug hole. This is the lowest form of maintenance and the cheapest.

The second form of error costs a lot of money. The mechanic properly strips down the steering knuckle and repacks the birfield/steering knuckle by pulling the axle partway (but not all the way) out. Pulling it all the way out is simply a matter of pulling it another 3 feet and laying it on the bench, BTW. Upon reassembly, they replace the seals that seem to be allowing the grease to run out of the sphere where you can see it built up as mentioned earlier. They think this seal is the problem, after all (its actually a triple seal of rubber, felt and steel designed to contain thick grease, NOT thin oil) as that's where the leak is. Honest mistake, but it's the AXLE SEAL that is causing the grease to thin and leak. The axle is reassembled, the customer pays the bill (usually around $600 per side) and they drive off with that aforementioned axle seal not replaced. Anywhere from a month to 6 months later, the continued contamination of thin gear oil causes the thinned grease/oil mix to run out that new fancy triple seal again and causes a mess and lack of lube AGAIN. Sound familiar?

So, what needs to be done is a PROPER axle service that will again last 60,000 miles before the axle seal starts to wear and leak. I doubt your birfield is toast, but will wait to hear about the "click" test to help you make a judgement. If your front diff has not been allowed to get low, the birfield is still running in oil and that's completely OK.

Back to your front shaft. There are no less than THREE grease fittings on it and most mechanics are used to zero, or one. So, it may be that you simply need someone to grease the three zirc fittings. The more I think about it, this should be done before anything else and takes someone with a grease gun about 3 minutes if they take the time to properly wipe off each fitting before filling it with grease.

IdahoDoug

Unquote


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