Thread: 60 Barfing fuel
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Old 07-14-2013, 12:07 PM
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Remember your backpacking days when you discovered boiling water at high altitudes isn't hot.

Methods used at high altitudes

From pressure cooking: A pressure cooker is often used to compensate for the low atmospheric pressure at a very high elevation. Under these circumstances water boils at temperatures significantly below 100 °C (212 °F) and, without the use of a pressure cooker, may leave boiled foods undercooked, as described in Charles Darwin's The Voyage of the Beagle (chapter XV, March 21st, 1835 books.google):


There are lots of articles... get ready for when 25% makes our old iron obsolete. Conspiracy or not, it will take some getting used to. Also remember that current emissions regulation does everything in it's power to prevent your gas tank from venting into the atmosphere (non vented gas caps and charcoal canisters) that makes the problem worse.

I'll get off my soap box if you ask me to Try to buy an LED or CFL, for your oven or dryer, now that we decided incandescent light bulbs are bad...

I learned this today reading the article below... E10 fuel is not as stable as past formulas. Older formulations would stay “fresh†for about 6 months. E10 can go stale in about 2 – 3 weeks.

Here is one on boats... I found a few articles that farmers had written that their old tractors cannot run on 10% ethanol and their tanks are boiling...
http://www.stripersonline.com/t/5092...-fuel-problems

I received this article in a email from Marine Parts Express.com they sell & service marine engines and parts. Hope it helps you guys with your fuel problems.





ETHANOL PROBLEMS





By Robert Van Brunt


Chief Petty Officer U.S.G.G. ret





ETHANOL AND VAPOR LOCK





Short description:


When the engine compartment becomes hot either by climate or idling, and you use ethanol-blend gasoline it can cause excessive vapors in your fuel line and starve the engine of fuel. The engine can run poorly or stop and will not run until the fuel condenses.





THE PROBLEMS





Vapor Lock





Fuel containing 10% ethanol is called E10. If you have ethanol in your gas, you run the risk of creating vapor lock because of excess vapors.





Ethanol “boils†at 87ÂşF (at normal atmospheric pressure) and turns from a liquid to a gaseous state. By comparison, most automobiles have their fuel pump in the gas tank, so the whole system remains under pressure unlike boats whose fuel tanks are vented. In a closed system, the higher pressure raises the flash point of the ethanol reducing the amount of vapor that is produced. In addition, most automobile fuel lines are outside of the vehicle allowing them to stay cooler.





Since most boat fuel lines are in the enclosed space (sometimes even insulated) of the engine compartment, normal ventilation will not cool the fuel significantly enough to avoid the potential problems of vapor lock. Furthermore, since the fuel pump in a boat is mounted on the engine (versus a car where the pump resides in the tank) the action of the pump can reduce pressure in the tank to below atmospheric pressure and further reduce the flash point.





Boat engineers are aware of this problem and are reducing the likelihood of this occurring by reducing the suction required by the fuel pump, minimizing hose fittings and bends, and including a quality anti-siphon valve. In existing boats, fuel lines and filters should be kept as low in the boat as possible and tank vents should be cleaned and open.





Heat Soak





Most boats have “forced†ventilation. Air moves through the engine compartment when the boat moves forward. Heat soak happens after you have been at high RPM and then stop or drift on idle for a while. Because of heat soak the engine compartment will rise to a point where the ethanol will boil





THE CURE





To prevent vapor lock (i.e. boiling ethanol):





1. Make sure the engine compartment has adequate ventilation.


2. Relocate fuel lines to be low in the bilge. (The bilge is cooler because it is in direct contact with the water.)


3. Monitor the engine compartment temperature.


4. Add (or turn on) engine room blowers.


5. Keep the tank vent clean and unobstructed.
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Last edited by treerootCO; 07-14-2013 at 03:15 PM.
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