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Old 05-05-2008, 08:23 PM
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Groucho Groucho is offline
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Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Arvada, Colorado
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Cool Repeater etiquette and the like...

Just thought since we as a group are getting more active in using the repeaters, it might be nice to post up some etiquette and usefull hints to remember when on the air.


Repeater Hint #1:
When using a repeater, wait for the repeater to un-key before trying to transmit. On the linked Colorado Connection repeaters, this means waiting for the dah-di-dah (morse code "K") after each person transmits before keying up.

If this is not done, the repeater will not completely drop the linked signal, making the linked connection lost for a part, if not all of the next transmission. What this sounds like is:
To the folks using the same repeater (for example the Denver repeater):
Everyone on the Denver repeater will still hear each others transmissions because the repeater will act the same whether doing the UHF link or not.

Anyone outside of the Denver repeater will hear dead air (but it will sound like someone is keying the repeater). This is due to the UHF link between repeaters has not been properly dropped, and therefore not working. This may cause trouble such as broken links and down repeaters if done over and over.

On other, non linked repeaters, wait till the repeater drops and then key up. This is usually when a squelch tail is heard. For those who don't know what a squelch tail sounds like, just think of the noise you make with your mouth when mimiking the end of a transmission on your make-believe walkie talkies. Roger that, podacter! Over and out! Cheeerrrccchhh!← That is the squelch tail.

On a repeater that is using the IRLP linking system, the same applies. WAIT until the repeater drops completely before making another transmission. It may not be necessary to do this to ensure the connection on the IRLP is working, but it is good etiquette.

Repeater hint #2:

Listen.

Listen.

Listen, then Listen again.

All the help one needs is there if one just listens. Repeaters all have their own lingo, their own code. If someone new to the repeater will stop and listen, all of this will become evident. We have a strong police-ourselves atmosphere. If someone new does something incorectly, regulars will help correct. If someone who is corrected keeps doing the same bad habit over and over, everyone will ignore that person. So listen. Then talk.

Repeater hint #3:
Keep your transmissions short and to the point. Worse case, you may be causing an emergency to lose critical time. Best case, you time-out the repeater, then everyone knows you're a windbag, or WRDY.
Don't try to think what you are going to say during your transmission. Take the few seconds to gather your thoughts and then go at it. It will sound more like we know what we are talking about.

Lets keep this going. Everyone here has earned the right to be able to put something in this thread. You are HAMs. Keep things going so that we all get to enjoy this facet of our wheeling hobby. Post a hint up. Read your repeater directory notes (in the front or back of the ARRL repeater directory). Tell me something I haven't heard before.
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Last edited by Groucho; 05-06-2008 at 06:40 AM.