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Old 06-10-2008, 03:30 PM
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DaveInDenver DaveInDenver is offline
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Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Larimer County
Posts: 6,586
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Bud's cross member just maximizes clearance in a stock set-up. There's not much to be gained beyond what he does in this configuration. When you go to a FROR configuration, you lose the transmission isolator and the transfer case takes more of the shock. It's a strong case, but it's still a cast aluminum housing and with enough impacts it will eventually fracture.

IMO I think a truck set up like ours is better served by doing a drivetrain lift and keeping the stock style rear mount, just moved 2" up into the frame rails. Just me, I'd rather have the steel taking the punishment and transmit the energy to the frame, then isolate the important stuff to reduce the shock it sees. It's not a matter of avoiding banging, rubbing and scraping, that's gonna happen no matter what. I'm assuming all these new skids and sliders are wear items and get R&R when they bend and grind up enough. Until you go SAS and run 35" tires, the frame rails are only so far from the deck and there's not much that can be done to avoid the reality.

Think you got problems at 103" of wheelbase, try 122"! Seems to me that you have to decide what direction to go with the truck. If you are hanging up and dragging a lot, then maybe a SAS and going down the more dedicated rig route makes sense. There's being that pigheaded guy who 'wheels IFS just to show 'em and there's being reasonable. I have no interest in doing an SAS for my own reasons, but I'm also not fooling myself, the Rubicon isn't gonna be done cleanly or smoothly. And it's really the major exception to the primary purpose of my truck.
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